vest

noun
\ ˈvest How to pronounce vest (audio) \

Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a sleeveless garment for the upper body usually worn over a shirt
b : a protective usually sleeveless garment (such as a life preserver) that extends to the waist
c : an insulated sleeveless waist-length garment often worn under or in place of a coat
2a chiefly British : a man's sleeveless undershirt
b : a knitted undershirt for women
3 : a plain or decorative piece used to fill in the front neckline of a woman's outer garment (such as a blouse or dress)
4 archaic
a : a loose outer garment : robe

vest

verb
vested; vesting; vests

Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to grant or endow with a particular authority, right, or property the plan vests workers with pension benefits after 10 years of service
b : to place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority especially : to give to a person a legally fixed immediate right of present or future enjoyment of (such as an estate)
2 : to clothe with or as if with a garment especially : to robe in ecclesiastical vestments

intransitive verb

1 : to become legally vested
2 : to put on garments or vestments

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Other Words from vest

Noun

vestlike \ ˈvest-​ˌlīk How to pronounce vest (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for vest

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of vest in a Sentence

Verb “By the power vested in me by the state,” intoned the minister, “I now pronounce that you are married” vested the power to access their retirement accounts with their attorney
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Other charges made public Tuesday included ones against Aaron Mostofsky, 34, the son of a Brooklyn judge, who was photographed inside the Capitol wearing what appear to be several fur pelts, a U.S. Capitol Police bulletproof vest and a riot shield. Anchorage Daily News, "Justice Department investigating potential sedition, conspiracy, terror charges against rioters," 12 Jan. 2021 State Senator Erika Geiss, a Democrat from Taylor, Mich., who now keeps a bulletproof vest at her desk, watched the events in Washington with the same sense of recognition and dread. New York Times, "In Michigan, a Dress Rehearsal for the Chaos at the Capitol on Wednesday," 9 Jan. 2021 Officers stopped a man wearing a bulletproof vest and carrying a gun. Adam Ferrise, cleveland, "9 hours of violence: Peaceful protest on May 30 turned to chaos as police tried to keep up," 3 Dec. 2020 The state public health officer, Dr. Scott Harris, has to wear a bulletproof vest in public because of threats to his life. Kyle Whitmire, al, "Wait-n-see is over. Do something now, Kay Ivey.," 2 Dec. 2020 Hundreds of complaints have been filed against officers during the yellow vest movement against social injustice, which erupted in 2018 and saw weekends of violent clashes. Sylvie Corbet, The Christian Science Monitor, "French protesters denounce bill outlawing use of police images," 30 Nov. 2020 Lululemon has activewear for women and men, like soft, barely-there Align Pant leggings in a variety of lengths, stretchy joggers, fast-drying Everlux fabric tights and wind- and water-resistant vest fabric. oregonlive, "Black Friday fit gifts: Burn calories, get healthy with big deals on home gym gear, workout clothing, fitness trackers," 27 Nov. 2020 An older man wearing a bulletproof vest tried to push open the bus door. Lauren Smiley, Wired, "The True Story of the Antifa Invasion of Forks, Washington," 8 Oct. 2020 According to the National Guard: Chief Crist then went to the left side of the aircraft and ran a tether to the aircraft and hooked it on his air warrior vest. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "Here's What's in an Apache Helicopter Survival Kit," 30 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The stock will vest in three years, on Dec. 14, 2023, provided the employee doesn’t leave the company through that date. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Seaweed surplus, vaccine dose reductions, DC gets help: News from around our 50 states," 21 Dec. 2020 In part this happens because the fundamental variability of nature will always produce outliers, and the human impulse to identify patterns in the world around us can vest anomalies with exaggerated significance. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, "Column: Why I never ‘agree to disagree’ — I just tell you you’re wrong," 22 Dec. 2020 The stock will vest in three years, on Dec. 14, 2023, provided the employee doesn’t leave the company through that date. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, "Seaweed surplus, vaccine dose reductions, DC gets help: News from around our 50 states," 21 Dec. 2020 Your payments, on the other hand, vest immediately. Deborah Acosta, WSJ, "How to Negotiate a Better Severance Package If You Are Being Laid Off," 16 Dec. 2020 The stock will vest in three years, on Dec. 14, 2023, provided the employee doesn’t leave the company through that date. Dominic Gates, chicagotribune.com, "Boeing saves cash by giving 82,000 workers stock, not pay raises," 17 Dec. 2020 The warrants will vest in three annual installments of 315,200 on the anniversary of the issue date. Patrick Danner, ExpressNews.com, "San Antonio’s Usio acquires Information Management Solutions’ assets," 16 Dec. 2020 The Framers had rejected proposals to vest pardons in the courts or even the Senate in cases where the president might have a conflict of interest. John Yoo, National Review, "Implications of the Flynn Pardon," 25 Nov. 2020 The restricted stock won't fully vest until January 2023. Michael Liedtke, Star Tribune, "Northern California utility finds latest CEO in Michigan," 18 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vest

Noun

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

History and Etymology for vest

Noun

French veste, from It, from Latin vestis garment

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French vestir to clothe, invest, vest, from Latin vestire to clothe, from vestis clothing, garment — more at wear

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Time Traveler for vest

Time Traveler

The first known use of vest was in the 15th century

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Statistics for vest

Last Updated

18 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Vest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vest. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for vest

vest

noun
How to pronounce vest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sleeveless piece of clothing with buttons down the front that is worn over a shirt and under a suit jacket
: a special piece of clothing that you wear on your upper body for protection or safety
British : a man's sleeveless undershirt

vest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to give (someone) the legal right or power to do something or to own land or property

vest

noun
\ ˈvest How to pronounce vest (audio) \

Kids Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sleeveless garment usually worn under a suit coat

vest

verb
vested; vesting

Kids Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to place or give into the possession or control of some person or authority The Constitution vests the Congress with certain powers.
2 : to clothe in vestments

vest

verb

Legal Definition of vest

transitive verb

1 : to place in the possession, discretion, or province of some person or authority all legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United StatesU.S. Constitution art. I a timely notice of appeal vests jurisdiction in the appeals court specifically : to give to a person a fixed and immediate right of present or future enjoyment of (as an estate) an interest vested in the beneficiary
2 : to grant or endow with a particular authority, right, or property vest a judge with discretion

intransitive verb

: to become vested specifically : to entitle one unconditionally to the payment of pension benefits upon termination or retirement his pension interest will vest after ten years with the company — compare mature

History and Etymology for vest

Anglo-French vestir, literally, to clothe, from Old French, from Latin vestire

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