vest

noun
\ ˈvest How to pronounce vest (audio) \

Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a sleeveless garment for the upper body usually worn over a shirt
b : a protective usually sleeveless garment (such as a life preserver) that extends to the waist
c : an insulated sleeveless waist-length garment often worn under or in place of a coat
2a chiefly British : a man's sleeveless undershirt
b : a knitted undershirt for women
3 : a plain or decorative piece used to fill in the front neckline of a woman's outer garment (such as a blouse or dress)

4 archaic

a : a loose outer garment : robe
b : clothing, garb

vest

verb
vested; vesting; vests

Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to grant or endow with a particular authority, right, or property the plan vests workers with pension benefits after 10 years of service
b : to place or give into the possession or discretion of some person or authority especially : to give to a person a legally fixed immediate right of present or future enjoyment of (such as an estate)
2 : to clothe with or as if with a garment especially : to robe in ecclesiastical vestments

intransitive verb

1 : to become legally vested
2 : to put on garments or vestments

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Other Words from vest

Noun

vestlike \ ˈvest-​ˌlīk How to pronounce vestlike (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for vest

Synonyms: Verb

accredit, authorize, certify, charter [British], commission, empower, enable, invest, license (also licence), qualify, warrant

Antonyms: Verb

disqualify

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Examples of vest in a Sentence

Verb

“By the power vested in me by the state,” intoned the minister, “I now pronounce that you are married” vested the power to access their retirement accounts with their attorney

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Round preferred to wander outdoors, where passengers bundled up in jackets and sweater vests, an odd contrast to the palm trees, pools, and lounge chairs on deck. Laura Mallonee, WIRED, "Forget the Bahamas. China's Cruises Are Where It's At," 10 June 2019 Its once-sleepy downtown is now a strip of luxe hotels and high-heeled tourists clad in fur vests, who’ve become more visible as Napa’s working- and middle-class residents trickle out to more affordable towns. Kira Garcia, Bon Appetit, "Napa Has Changed, Butter Cream Bakery Has Not," 6 June 2018 Jason Nez studies something that's too often forgotten amid the awe-inspiring views and canyon walls: those who live there Jason Nez wears a wool vest, scuffed boots, and a look of total concentration. Zak Podmore, Outside Online, "The Native Americans Who Call the Grand Canyon Home," 24 May 2018 He is decked out in his Nevada best — tan cowboy hat, black leather boots and vest, a silver bolo tie in the angular shape of the state of Nevada. Leah Sottile, Longreads, "Bundyville Chapter Four: The Gospel of Bundy," 18 May 2018 Working the bar was a 19-year-old Russian in a black bowtie and vest, whom Ivan warmly referred to as Tom Cruise. Nimrod Nir, Newsweek, "Welcome to Pyramiden, a Mysterious Soviet Ghost Town, Where I Was Imprisoned by Nature—and My Poor Judgment," 14 Feb. 2018 Cole went with an earthy palette, rocking a red vest, pants, and nude top, bedazzled by his own assortment of flowers and tied together with a decorative knot. Gabe Bergado, Teen Vogue, "Lili Reinhart and Cole Sprouse Were a Walking Fairytale at the Met Gala 2019," 7 May 2019 Tensions among yellow vests and growing public fatigue with the protests have weakened the movement in recent weeks. Noemie Bisserbe, WSJ, "France’s Yellow Vests Are Unappeased and Back to Demanding Change," 27 Apr. 2019 After strapping on one of The Void’s VR headsets and haptic vests, players appear to each other as one of several different colorful cartoon characters. Bryan Bishop, The Verge, "The Void’s Ralph Breaks VR puts players inside a giant interactive Disney movie," 21 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The Electoral College was about deliberately vesting the power to elect the nation’s chief executive solely in the hands of slave-owning, land-owning, white men. Ian Silverii, The Denver Post, "Silverii: Ditch the Electoral College and the inequality it perpetuates," 14 June 2019 She's dragged the whole country into this and short-circuited a process the rest of us are vested in and not bothered to explain herself? Fox News, "New evidence of political bias at Google; gender politics at play in Michigan Senate race," 21 Sep. 2018 Historically, making the case for a violation of the take care clause has been a tall order because the executive is often vested with broad discretion to implement the law. Abbe Gluck, Vox, "The fate of the ACA could turn on Judge Kavanaugh’s appointment," 23 July 2018 Leaderfull movements, on the other hand, purposely push power out to the grassroots, vesting authority in local chapters rather than controlling from the top. Leslie Crutchfield, Fortune, "Why the Best Leaders Give Their Power Away," 12 May 2018 The king’s duties, similar to those of the British monarch, are largely ceremonial since administrative power is vested in the prime minister and parliament. Eileen Ng, The Seattle Times, "A look at Malaysia’s monarchy before sultans pick next king," 23 Jan. 2019 Newsletter Sign-up The restricted-stock program, which vests over two years, is being replaced with a direct stock-purchase plan. Laura Stevens, WSJ, "Amazon to Raise Its Minimum U.S. Wage to $15 an Hour," 2 Oct. 2018 That’s not to say they aren’t vested in Bacon’s development, but the situations aren’t parallel. Rick Bonnell, charlotteobserver, "Your Charlotte Hornets questions on salary cap, Cody Zeller, Tony Parker and more," 12 July 2018 Jurich will receive the annuity payments already vested, totaling $1.76 million ($220,000 per year through 2025). Jake Lourim, The Courier-Journal, "$4.5 million check and game tickets among Tom Jurich's settlement haul," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vest

Noun

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 4

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

History and Etymology for vest

Noun

French veste, from It, from Latin vestis garment

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French vestir to clothe, invest, vest, from Latin vestire to clothe, from vestis clothing, garment — more at wear

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Statistics for vest

Last Updated

17 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for vest

The first known use of vest was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for vest

vest

noun

English Language Learners Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sleeveless piece of clothing with buttons down the front that is worn over a shirt and under a suit jacket
: a special piece of clothing that you wear on your upper body for protection or safety
British : a man's sleeveless undershirt

vest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to give (someone) the legal right or power to do something or to own land or property

vest

noun
\ ˈvest How to pronounce vest (audio) \

Kids Definition of vest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sleeveless garment usually worn under a suit coat

vest

verb
vested; vesting

Kids Definition of vest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to place or give into the possession or control of some person or authority The Constitution vests the Congress with certain powers.
2 : to clothe in vestments

vest

verb

Legal Definition of vest

transitive verb

1 : to place in the possession, discretion, or province of some person or authority all legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United StatesU.S. Constitution art. I a timely notice of appeal vests jurisdiction in the appeals court specifically : to give to a person a fixed and immediate right of present or future enjoyment of (as an estate) an interest vested in the beneficiary
2 : to grant or endow with a particular authority, right, or property vest a judge with discretion

intransitive verb

: to become vested specifically : to entitle one unconditionally to the payment of pension benefits upon termination or retirement his pension interest will vest after ten years with the company — compare mature

History and Etymology for vest

Anglo-French vestir, literally, to clothe, from Old French, from Latin vestire

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More from Merriam-Webster on vest

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with vest

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for vest

Spanish Central: Translation of vest

Nglish: Translation of vest for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of vest for Arabic Speakers

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