trust

noun
\ˈtrəst \

Definition of trust 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something

b : one in which confidence is placed

2a : dependence on something future or contingent : hope

b : reliance on future payment for property (such as merchandise) delivered : credit bought furniture on trust

3a : a property interest held by one person for the benefit of another

b : a combination of firms or corporations formed by a legal agreement especially : one that reduces or threatens to reduce competition

4a : care, custody the child committed to her trust

b(1) : a charge or duty imposed in faith or confidence or as a condition of some relationship

(2) : something committed or entrusted to one to be used or cared for in the interest of another

c : responsible charge or office

5 archaic : trustworthiness

in trust

: in the care or possession of a trustee

trust

verb
trusted; trusting; trusts

Definition of trust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to rely on the truthfulness or accuracy of : believe trust a rumor

b : to place confidence in : rely on a friend you can trust

c : to hope or expect confidently trusts that the problem will be resolved soon

2a : to commit or place in one's care or keeping : entrust

b : to permit to stay or go or to do something without fear or misgiving

3 : to extend credit to

intransitive verb

1a : to place confidence : depend trust in God trust to luck

b : to be confident : hope

2 : to sell or deliver on credit

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from trust

Verb

trustability \ˌtrə-​stə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē \ noun
trustable \ˈtrə-​stə-​bəl \ adjective
truster noun
trustingly \ˈtrə-​stiŋ-​lē \ adverb
trustingness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for trust

Synonyms: Noun

confidence, credence, faith, stock

Synonyms: Verb

assign, charge, commission, entrust (also intrust), task

Antonyms: Noun

distrust, mistrust

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of trust in a Sentence

Noun

A hope is more than resolve, and it is based on trust in a divine faithfulness that operates not only within history, but also beyond history. — John Polkinghorne, Times Literary Supplement, 3 May 2002 Put not your trust in money, but put your money in trust. — Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table, 1858 Our relationship is founded on mutual love and trust. His lies and deception shattered my trust in him. She has no trust in the security of online banking. He created a trust for his children. The property will be held in trust until her 18th birthday. laws limiting the formation of trusts

Verb

It is these questions which define the crisis confronting the CIA—an increasingly clear-eyed skepticism among legislators, commentators, the broad general public, and the rest of the world that American intelligence officials, when they are under pressure, can be trusted to call them as they see them. — Thomas Powers, New York Review of Books, 29 Apr. 2004 Perhaps Hollywood can't be trusted to make Hollywood-style movies anymore. — Richard Corliss, Time, 13 Dec. 2004 Whenever Eugenides presses on his themes this way, he bruises them; he stops trusting in his tale, apparently unaware that its very form incarnates its theme better than can any commentary. — James Wood, New Republic, 7 Oct. 2002 The strong man, or the junta or the plutocracy could no more be trusted with a monopoly on power than the commissariat. — Kevin Baker, Harper's, May 2001 Nagumo also trusted in the complicated battle plan for the Midway operation, which called for a diversionary raid on Alaska's Aleutian Island chain, to draw off American naval strength. — David M. Kennedy, Atlantic, March 1999 Working together is going to be difficult if you don't trust each other. “Are you sure this will work?” “Trust me. I know what I'm doing.” If you have a problem, tell your parent, teacher, or someone else you trust. I should never have trusted him. Their company is a trusted name in quality appliances. Don't trust everything you read. You can't trust the rumors. You should trust your instincts and do what you think is right.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The system places too much trust in employers to make sure their workers are earning enough in tips to meet the federal minimum wage, according to the 2014 report from Obama’s economic advisers. Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox, "DC repealed a ballot measure giving restaurant workers a raise. But it might be back.," 12 Dec. 2018 In response, Sidewalk Labs proposed a civic data trust that would create an independent oversight group and open standards for sharing information. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Sidewalk Labs’s updated smart city plan aims for ‘people-first public realm’," 30 Nov. 2018 My colleague here at NYU, Arun Soundarajan, talks a lot about trust and identity. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Microsoft is more valuable than Apple again. Why?," 30 Nov. 2018 And Lizzie [Moss] and I are very close and trust and respect each other. Mehera Bonner, Marie Claire, "The 20 Most Graphic and Gorgeous Sex Scenes on TV," 16 Nov. 2018 The Past: Election hackers are usually trying to sow confusion and undermine trust in the institutions of democracy. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "If the 2018 Election Is Hacked, This Is How It Will Happen," 5 Nov. 2018 Regardless, the breach could do further damage to Facebook's reputation as the company continues to attempt to regain public trust after a recent string of security and privacy issues. Sean Gallagher, Ars Technica, "50 million Facebook accounts breached by access-token-harvesting attack," 28 Sep. 2018 Ranelletti said in the letter that Espinosa jeopardized public trust with a series of inconsistent statements and questionable behavior. Kimberly Veklerov, SFChronicle.com, "Oakland finds likely collusion between inspector, property owner in eviction," 1 July 2018 Both sides have degraded the public trust with petty payback and childish behavior. kansascity, "Jean Paul Bradshaw," 30 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But one trusted name in the camper van business has been around since 2002, providing adventurers with both fully built out vans and the parts to do it themselves. Megan Barber, Curbed, "Camper van sleeps four and hides a clever bathroom," 21 Sep. 2018 The hardest part of getting injured was not being able to trust in the same things afterward. Molly Mirhashem, Outside Online, "The pro runner suffered an injury in the middle of the Olympics. Here's how she plotted her comeback.," 26 June 2018 Only Heist, who has ties to both gangs and as such belongs to neither, can be trusted to behave with humanity. Constance Grady, Vox, "Jonathan Lethem’s Feral Detective is a mess. But it’s a fun mess.," 27 Nov. 2018 These included the number of comments on a Facebook post, the kinds of images on the posts, or the sender, with people assuming WhatsApp messages from family and friends could be trusted and sent on without checking. Casey Newton, The Verge, "How Mark Zuckerberg became a wartime CEO," 20 Nov. 2018 White t-shirts, gauzy fabrics, and flowy caftans feel breezy, but can’t be trusted to offer much sun protection. Laurel Naversen Geraghty, SELF, "7 Things You Shouldn’t Rely on for Sun Protection," 12 Aug. 2018 Those teams are legit contenders, and Washington, with a rookie manager and postseason flops, is a team with a culture that can’t be trusted much. Tom Verducci, SI.com, "Nine Innings: How Bryce Harper Is Trying to Revive His Season, What We Learned in the First Half and More," 9 July 2018 If the administration decides to return to a campaign of maximum pressure, officials have privately acknowledged, the administration may not again be able to persuade the world that Kim is out of control and cannot be trusted with nuclear weapons. Gardiner Harris, BostonGlobe.com, "Pompeo arrives in North Korea to try to curb its nuclear program," 6 July 2018 Finally, is Celia’s new lover (who also happens to be an old boyfriend) part of the good gang or the bad gang, to be trusted or to be denied? Beth Kephart, Philly.com, "Frances Metzman's 'Cha-Cha Babes of Pelican Bay': The rules of dancing, life, and rocking thongs in a retirement village," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of trust

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for trust

Noun

Middle English, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse traust trust; akin to Old English trēowe faithful — more at true entry 1

Verb

see trust entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about trust

Statistics for trust

Last Updated

16 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for trust

The first known use of trust was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for trust

bypass trust

noun

Financial Definition of bypass trust

What It Is

Also called a credit-shelter trust, a bypass trust is a method of passing assets to beneficiaries without subjecting those assets to estate taxes.

How It Works

Let's say John Doe owns a horse farm worth $11 million. He wants to pass the farm down to his son, James, when he dies. He does not have much in the way of cash -- all of his assets are in the farm.

John puts the farm in a bypass trust. Then he dies and James inherits the farm. James works the farm for 40 years, and then he dies and leaves the farm to his son, Jake.

Because the farm is in a bypass trust, James has to pay estate taxes on the farm when he inherits it from John, but Jake does not have to pay estate taxes on the farm when he inherits it from James. This is a good thing, because James has already paid estate taxes on the farm. Making Jake pay estate taxes again on the farm would amount to double taxation.

A bypass trust is irrevocable, meaning that once John puts the farm into a trust for James, he can't undo it. They also come with certain limits. For example, James must have restricted rights to liquidate the farm's assets, and John must specify in the trust what James can do financially in that regard. John can also control who James may leave the farm to.

Why It Matters

Bypass trusts help parents pass assets to children or other beneficiaries (or spouses pass assets to each other) in a manner that prevents the assets from being subjected to estate tax multiple times. However, because they are irrevocable, the decision to put assets in a bypass trust is one that must be made carefully. Also, the IRS sets forth specific wording that must be used in bypass trusts in order for them to "count," so it is important to use an experienced estate attorney when creating a bypass trust.

Source: Investing Answers

dry trust

noun

Financial Definition of dry trust

What It Is

Also called a naked trust or a passive trust, with a dry trust, a person transfers assets into a trust in order to pass them on to heirs or beneficiaries.

How It Works

Let's say John Doe is in a shaky marriage and wants to make sure $1 million of his money goes to his children rather than his second wife, whom he may divorce. He puts the money in a dry trust for his children.

The children are only 10 and 8 years old, but when they turn 18, they will have access to and control over the assets. In the meantime, John's wife cannot touch the assets, and a trustee manages the money on behalf of the children rather than on behalf of John Doe.

Why It Matters

Dry trusts are a way to ensure that beneficiaries receive assets as intended, but they also mean the benefactor gives up control over the assets. Additionally, age is typically the only condition of a dry trust, meaning that the trustee can't withhold funds from the trust if, say, John's children drop out of college, become addicted to drugs, or marry someone John doesn't like. The children simply must be at least 18 years old to obtain full control over the money.

Source: Investing Answers

land trust

noun

Financial Definition of land trust

What It Is

A land trust is a trust comprised exclusively of real estate assets.

How It Works

A land trust holds one or more properties for the benefit of a designated group or organization (beneficiary). The trust is managed by a trustee or board of trustees responsible for overseeing the property or properties on behalf of the beneficiary. Land trust beneficiaries can be for-profit or not-for-profit organizations trying to privately accumulate property holdings for purposes such as expansion or conservation. For example, a community with endangered wildlife may have a land trust for pieces of land that qualify as wildlife sanctuaries.

Why It Matters

The activities of a land trust, as with any manner of trust, are private in nature. For this reason, organizations acquire property by way of a land trust so not to effect a sudden change in the value of the property.

Source: Investing Answers

naked trust

noun

Financial Definition of naked trust

What It Is

Also called a dry trust or a passive trust, with a naked trust, a person transfers assets into a trust in order to pass them on to heirs or beneficiaries.

How It Works

Let's say John Doe is in a shaky marriage and wants to make sure $1 million of his money goes to his children rather than his second wife, whom he may divorce. He puts the money in a naked trust for his children.

The children are only 10 and 8 years old, but when they turn 18, they will have control over the assets. In the meantime, John's wife cannot touch the assets, and a trustee manages the money on behalf of the children rather than on behalf of John Doe.

Why It Matters

Naked trusts are a way to ensure that beneficiaries receive assets as intended, but they also mean the benefactor gives up control over the assets. Additionally, age is typically the only condition of a naked trust, meaning that the trustee can't withhold funds from the trust if, say, John's children drop out of college, become addicted to drugs, or marry someone John doesn't like. The children simply must be at least 18 years old to obtain full control over the money.

Source: Investing Answers

passive trust

noun

Financial Definition of passive trust

What It Is

Also called a dry trust or a naked trust, a passive trust is a trust into which a person transfers assets in order to pass them on to heirs or beneficiaries.

How It Works

For example, let's say John Doe is in a shaky marriage and wants to make sure $1 million of his money goes to his children rather than his second wife, whom he many divorce. He puts the money in a passive trust for his children.

The children are only 10 and 8 years old, but when they turn 18, they will have access to and control over the assets. In the meantime, John's wife cannot touch the assets, and a trustee manages the money on behalf of the children rather than on behalf of John Doe.

Why It Matters

Passive trusts are a way to ensure that beneficiaries receive assets as intended, but they also mean that the benefactor gives up control over the assets. Additionally, age is typically the only condition of a passive trust, meaning that the trustee can't withhold funds from the trust if, say, John's children do something of which he disapproves, such as dropping out of college. The children simply must be at least 18 years old to obtain full control over the money.

Source: Investing Answers

revocable trust

noun

Financial Definition of revocable trust

What It Is

A revocable trust is a trust with provisions that can be altered by the grantor. Sometimes a revocable trust is referred to as a "living revocable trust."

How It Works

A trust is a legal instrument that allows property to be passed to heirs and beneficiaries without going through probate (i.e., state directed distributions of assets upon death). A revocable trust gives the full control of the assets held in the trust to the grantor (i.e., the person setting up the trust). In addition, all incomes and distributions from the assets in the revocable trust are given to the grantor during their lifetime.

Why It Matters

Revocable trusts are an important way to ensure that assets will be passed along to heirs, especially in cases of sudden incapacity or death by the grantor. However, there is no tax savings to the grantor or the beneficiaries by having their assets in a revocable trust.

Source: Investing Answers

trust

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: belief that someone or something is reliable, good, honest, effective, etc.

: an arrangement in which someone's property or money is legally held or managed by someone else or by an organization (such as a bank) for usually a set period of time

: an organization that results from the creation of a trust

trust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to believe that someone or something is reliable, good, honest, effective, etc. : to have confidence in (someone or something)

: to believe that something is true or correct

: to hope or expect that something is true or will happen

trust

verb
\ˈtrəst \
trusted; trusting

Kids Definition of trust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to rely on or on the truth of : believe I wouldn't trust anything he says.

2 : to place confidence in someone or something She doesn't trust the car to get us home.

3 : to be confident : hope “I trust you will not damage your gown this time.”— Gail Carson Levine, Ella Enchanted

trust

noun

Kids Definition of trust (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : firm belief in the character, strength, or truth of someone or something He placed his trust in me.

2 : a person or thing in which confidence is placed

3 : confident hope I waited in trust of their return.

4 : a property interest held by one person or organization (as a bank) for the benefit of another

5 : a combination of firms or corporations formed by a legal agreement and often held to reduce competition

6 : an organization in which money is held or managed by someone for the benefit of another or others

7 : responsibility for safety and well-being I left my cat in the trust of neighbors.

Keep scrolling for more

trust

noun

Legal Definition of trust 

1a : a fiduciary relationship in which one party holds legal title to another's property for the benefit of a party who holds equitable title to the property

b : an entity resulting from the establishment of such a relationship — see also beneficiary, cestui que trust, corpus, declaration of trust at declaration sense 4, principal, settlor

Note: Trusts developed out of the old English use. The traditional requirements of a trust are a named beneficiary and trustee (who may be the settlor), an identified res, or property, to be transferred to the trustee and constitute the principal of the trust, and delivery of the res to the trustee with the intent to create a trust. Not all relationships labeled as trusts have all of these characteristics, however. Trusts are often created for their advantageous tax treatment.

accumulation trust

: a trust in which principal and income are allowed to accumulate rather than being paid out

Note: Accumulation trusts are disfavored and often restricted in the law.

active trust

: a trust in which legal title remains in the trustee who has a duty to act affirmatively (as in exercising control, discretion, and judgment) with regard to the property — compare passive trust in this entry

alimony trust

: a trust created often in accordance with a separation agreement in which property is transferred to the trust as a source of support for a divorced spouse with a remainder to someone else

bank account trust

: totten trust in this entry

business trust

: a trust that is created for the purpose of making profit and that is usually characterized by some kind of commercial activity, transferable certificates of interest, existence continuing after the death of beneficiaries, limited liability, legal title in the hands of trustees, and officers having duties of management

called also common-law trust, Massachusetts trust

Note: A trust that qualifies as a business trust is eligible for bankruptcy protection under chapter 13 of the Bankruptcy Code.

bypass trust

: a trust in which a spouse leaves his or her estate upon death to a trust naming the surviving spouse as beneficiary usually with remainders to children or other descendants

called also bypass shelter trust, credit shelter trust, shelter trust

Note: The purpose of a bypass trust is to reduce the surviving spouse's taxable estate. Such trusts do not qualify for the marital deduction.

charitable lead trust \-​ˈlēd-​ \

: a trust in which a charity is named as the beneficiary for a period of time after which named individuals succeed as beneficiaries

charitable remainder annuity trust

: a charitable remainder trust in which the named beneficiaries receive a fixed payment of not less than five percent of the fair market value of the original principal over the course of a specified period after which the remaining principal passes to charity

charitable remainder trust

: a trust in which individuals are named as beneficiaries to receive income for a period of time (as the lifetimes of the beneficiaries) after which the principal passes to charity

Note: Charitable remainder trusts qualify for tax exemptions under section 664 of the Internal Revenue Code.

charitable remainder unitrust \-​ˈyü-​nə-​ˌtrəst \

: a charitable remainder trust in which the named beneficiaries receive payments of a fixed percentage and not less than five percent of the value of the trust assets as determined annually for a specified period after which the remainder passes to charity

charitable trust

: a trust created for the purpose of performing charity or providing social benefits

Note: Unlike most trusts, a charitable trust does not require definite beneficiaries and may exist in perpetuity.

Clifford trust \ˈkli-​fərd-​ \

: a grantor trust lasting at least ten years with income payable to a beneficiary and principal reverting to the settlor upon termination

Note: Prior to the Tax Reform Act of 1986, a Clifford trust could be used to divert income from the settlor, who was in a higher tax bracket, to a beneficiary, often a child, who was in a lower tax bracket. A settlor is currently treated as the owner of any portion of a trust in which he or she has a reversionary interest, and taxes are calculated at the settlor's rate.

common-law trust

: business trust in this entry

complex trust

: a trust under which any or all income does not have to be distributed and principal may be distributed — compare simple trust in this entry

constructive trust

1 : an implied trust imposed by a court to prevent the unjust enrichment of one who has wrongfully obtained (as through fraud or bad faith) title to the property or a property interest of another

called also trust de son tort, trust ex delicto, trust ex maleficio

— compare resulting trust in this entry

2 : an equitable remedy to prevent unjust enrichment by imposing a constructive trust

credit shelter trust

: bypass trust in this entry

Crummey trust \ˈkrə-​mē-​ \

: a trust which allows a donor to place a gift in trust while qualifying for the gift tax annual exclusion by giving the beneficiary an immediate right to the gift for a limited time after which it can only be accessed under the terms of the trust

discretionary trust

: a trust that gives the trustee authority to exercise his or her discretion in distributing principal or income to the beneficiary

dry trust

: passive trust in this entry

executed trust

: a trust in which nothing is left to be done by the trustee but preserve the property and execute the purpose of the trust

executory trust

: a trust in which the settlor or trustee has duties to perform (as securing the property, ascertaining the objects of the trust, or making distributions)

express trust

: a trust intentionally created by the settlor specifically : a trust created by a positive act of the settlor and set down in writing that expresses the intention to create a trust, identifies the property to be placed in trust, and names beneficiaries

generation-skipping trust

: a trust in which the principal goes to a skip person usually following payment of income for life to a non-skip person : a trust created by a generation-skipping transfer of property in trust

grantor retained annuity trust

: an irrevocable trust in which the grantor retains the right to a fixed annuity for a set term of years after which the trust assets transfer to the beneficiary

grantor retained income trust

: an irrevocable trust in which the grantor retains the right to all income for a specified term or for whichever comes first of a specified term or death after which the trust assets transfer to the beneficiary

grantor retained unitrust

: an irrevocable trust in which the grantor retains the right to receive annually a percentage of the fixed net fair market value of the assets for a specified term after which the trust assets transfer to the beneficiary

grantor trust

: a trust that is taxed at the settlor's tax rate because the settlor has the power to control the beneficial enjoyment of the trust, retains a reversionary interest in the trust, has administrative powers over the trust, has the power to revoke the trust, or benefits from the income of the trust

honorary trust \ˈä-​nə-​ˌrer-​ē-​ \

: a trust that is created for a purpose which is not charitable and that names no specific beneficiary

Note: An honorary trust may be upheld where allowed by statute if its purpose (as for the care of an animal or grave) is sufficiently clear. An honorary trust is subject to the rule against perpetuities, however.

Illinois land trust

: land trust in this entry

implied trust

: a trust arising by operation of law when the circumstances of a transaction imply the creation of a trust that is not expressly created by the parties and especially when a trust is necessary to avoid an inequitable result or to prevent fraud

individual policy pension trust

: an insurance trust created as a retirement plan in which individual life insurance policies are purchased for employees and held in trust by the employer to fund the plan

insurance trust

: a trust in which the principal consists of an insurance policy or its proceeds

inter vivos trust

: a trust that becomes effective during the lifetime of the settlor

called also living trust

— compare testamentary trust in this entry

investment trust

: a business trust that is a closed-end investment company

involuntary trust

: implied trust in this entry especially : constructive trust in this entry

irrevocable trust

: a trust that cannot be revoked by the settlor after its creation except upon the consent of all the beneficiaries

land trust

: a trust created to effectuate a real estate ownership arrangement in which the trustee holds legal and equitable title to the property subject to the provisions of a trust agreement setting out the rights of the beneficiaries whose interests in the trust are declared to be personal property

called also Illinois land trust, naked land trust

living trust

: inter vivos trust in this entry

marital deduction trust

: a marital trust created in order to qualify for the marital deduction especially : power of appointment trust in this entry

marital trust

: a testamentary trust naming a surviving spouse as the beneficiary — see also marital deduction trust and power of appointment trust in this entry

Massachusetts trust \ˌma-​sə-​ˈchü-​səts-​, -​zəts-​ \

: business trust in this entry

naked land trust

: land trust in this entry

naked trust

: passive trust in this entry

nominee trust

: a trust created for the purpose of holding property for beneficiaries whose identities are kept secret

oral trust

: a trust created by the settlor's spoken statements especially for the purpose of transferring real property as part of an agreement between the settlor and the trustee

passive trust

: a trust or use under which the trustee has no duties to perform : a trust in which legal and equitable titles are merged in the beneficiaries

called also dry trust, naked trust

— compare active trust in this entry

pour-over trust

: a trust that receives the assets that make up its principal by operation of a testamentary disposition to it usually of the residue of an estate or from another trust upon the settlor's death

power of appointment trust

: a marital trust that provides a surviving spouse with a life estate in property and a power of appointment allowing appointment of the property to the surviving spouse or to his or her estate

Note: A power of appointment trust made in accordance with Internal Revenue Code section 2056(b)(5) qualifies for the marital deduction.

protective trust

: a trust that attempts to shield assets from the beneficiaries' creditors by providing that it is within the trustee's discretion to refuse to pay a beneficiary or that a beneficiary forfeits his or her interest in the trust upon a creditor's attempt to reach it

purchase money resulting trust

: a resulting trust arising where not abolished by statute when property is purchased with title in the name of one person but using the money of another

QTIP trust \ˈkyü-​ˌtip-​ \

: a trust to which qualified terminable interest property is transferred for purposes of taking the marital deduction

qualified charitable remainder trust

: a trust that is either a charitable remainder annuity trust or a charitable remainder unitrust

real estate investment trust

: a business trust similar to a closed-end investment company except that it invests in real estate either as an owner having equity in the property or as a lender holding mortgages on the property

resulting trust

: an implied trust based upon the presumed intentions of the parties as inferred from all the circumstances that the party holding legal title to trust property holds it for the benefit of the other — compare constructive trust in this entry

revocable trust

: a trust over which the settlor has retained the power of revocation

savings bank trust

: totten trust in this entry

shelter trust

: bypass trust in this entry

simple trust

: a trust under which all current income must be distributed and no principal may be distributed

spendthrift trust

: a trust that is created for the benefit of a spendthrift who is paid income therefrom and that cannot be reached by creditors to satisfy the spendthrift's debts

tentative trust

: totten trust in this entry

testamentary trust

: a trust created in a will to be effective upon the settlor's death

Totten trust \ˈtät-​ᵊn-​ \

: a trust created by a deposit in a bank by one person as trustee for another that is revocable until the death of the depositor

called also bank account trust, savings bank trust, tentative trust

trust de son tort \-​də-​ˌsōn-​ˈtȯrt, -​ˌsȯⁿ-​ˈtȯr \ Anglo-French de son tort (desmesne) from his or her (own) wrongful act

: constructive trust in this entry

trust ex delicto

: constructive trust in this entry

trust ex maleficio

: constructive trust in this entry

unitrust \ˈyü-​nə-​ˌtrəst \

: a trust from which the beneficiary receives annually a fixed percentage of the net fair market value of the trust assets

unit trust

: a trust operating as a vehicle for investment whose portfolio consists of long-term bonds that are held to maturity

voting trust

: a trust created by the transfer of legal title to shares of stock to a trustee or trustees who exercise the corporate voting rights conferred by ownership of the shares as agreed in the trust instrument

Note: The shareholders transferring legal title to their shares retain the equitable title and continue to receive dividends and other distributions. They also receive certificates as evidence of their interest in the trust, which provides the holder with the rights of a shareholder except for voting rights.

2a : a combination of firms or corporations formed by an agreement establishing a trust whereby shareholders in the separate corporations exchange their shares for shares representing proportionate interest in the principal and income of the combination and surrender to the trustees the management and operation of the combined firms or corporations

b : a combination or aggregation of business entities formed by any of various means especially : one that reduces competition or is thought to present a threat of reducing competition — compare antitrust

3a : a charge or duty imposed in faith or confidence or as a condition of some relationship

b : something committed or entrusted to one to be used or cared for in the interest of another no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United StatesU.S. Constitution art. VI

c : the condition, obligation, or right of one to whom something is confided : responsible charge or office acted diligently in carrying out his trust as chairman of the board

d : custody a child committed to their trust

in trust

: in a trust property held in trust for the children

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on trust

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with trust

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for trust

Spanish Central: Translation of trust

Nglish: Translation of trust for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trust for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about trust

Comments on trust

What made you want to look up trust? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a typical or ideal example

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Find the Cousins

  • a-large-tree-with-many-branches
  • Which pair shares a common word ancestor?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!