credit

noun
cred·​it | \ ˈkre-dit \

Definition of credit 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : reliance on the truth or reality of something gave credit to everything he said Give no credit to idle rumors.
2a : the balance in a person's favor in an account
b : an amount or sum placed at a person's disposal by a bank
c : the provision of money, goods, or services with the expectation of future payment long-term credit also : money, goods, or services so provided They exhausted their credit.
d(1) : an entry on the right-hand side of an account constituting an addition to a revenue, net worth, or liability account
(2) : a deduction from an expense or asset account
e : any one of or the sum of the items entered on the right-hand side of an account
f : a deduction from an amount otherwise due
3a : influence or power derived from enjoying the confidence of another or others
b : good name : esteem also : financial or commercial trustworthiness
4 archaic : credibility
5 : a source of honor a credit to the school
6a : something that gains or adds to reputation or esteem : honor He took no credit for his kindly act.
b : recognition, acknowledgment quite willing to accept undeserved credit
7 : recognition by name of a person contributing to a performance (such as a film or telecast) the opening credits
8a : recognition by a school or college that a student has fulfilled a requirement leading to a degree
b : credit hour earned 15 credits last semester

credit

verb
credited; crediting; credits

Definition of credit (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to trust in the truth of : believe find his story hard to credit
2 : to supply goods on credit to
3 archaic : to bring credit or honor upon
4a : to enter upon the credit side of an account
b : to place an amount to the credit of credit his account with ten dollars
5a : to consider usually favorably as the source, agent, or performer of an action or the possessor of a trait credits him with an excellent sense of humor
b : to attribute to some person They credit the invention to him.

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Synonyms for credit

Synonyms: Noun

trust

Synonyms: Verb

accredit, ascribe, attribute, chalk up, impute, lay, put down

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Choose the Right Synonym for credit

Noun

belief, faith, credence, credit mean assent to the truth of something offered for acceptance. belief may or may not imply certitude in the believer. my belief that I had caught all the errors faith almost always implies certitude even where there is no evidence or proof. an unshakable faith in God credence suggests intellectual assent without implying anything about grounds for assent. a theory now given credence by scientists credit may imply assent on grounds other than direct proof. gave full credit to the statement of a reputable witness

influence, authority, prestige, weight, credit mean power exerted over the minds or behavior of others. influence may apply to a force exercised and received consciously or unconsciously. used her influence to get the bill passed authority implies the power of winning devotion or allegiance or of compelling acceptance and belief. his opinions lacked authority prestige implies the ascendancy given by conspicuous excellence or reputation for superiority. the prestige of the newspaper weight implies measurable or decisive influence in determining acts or choices. their wishes obviously carried much weight credit suggests influence that arises from the confidence of others. his credit with the press

Verb

ascribe, attribute, assign, impute, credit mean to lay something to the account of a person or thing. ascribe suggests an inferring or conjecturing of cause, quality, authorship. forged paintings formerly ascribed to masters attribute suggests less tentativeness than ascribe, less definiteness than assign. attributed to Rembrandt but possibly done by an associate assign implies ascribing with certainty or after deliberation. assigned the bones to the Cretaceous period impute suggests ascribing something that brings discredit by way of accusation or blame. tried to impute sinister motives to my actions credit implies ascribing a thing or especially an action to a person or other thing as its agent, source, or explanation. credited his teammates for his success

Examples of credit in a Sentence

Noun

banks that extend credit to the public You need to have a strong credit history and a good job in order to get a mortgage. A credit of $50 was added to your account. All the credit must go to the play's talented director. She's finally getting the credit she deserves. He shared the credit with his parents. You've got to give her credit; she knows what she's doing.

Verb

Your payment of $38.50 has been credited to your account. The bank is crediting your account for the full amount. They credited the rescue to his quick thinking.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The lehenga was designed by Indian designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee, who officially took credit for the look on his official Instagram story. Kayleigh Roberts, Harper's BAZAAR, "Behold Sophie Turner's Stunning Reception Dress for Nick Jonas and Priyanka Chopra's Wedding," 4 Dec. 2018 Studying cave paintings from Turkey, Spain, France, and Germany, researchers have come to the conclusion that humanity's ancient ancestors were smarter than previously given credit for. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Cave Paintings Suggest Ancient Humans Understood the Stars Much Better Than We Thought," 29 Nov. 2018 The Mulleavys are quick, however, to give credit to their longtime collaborators. Laura Regensdorf, Vogue, "Rodarte's Laura and Kate Mulleavy Talk Gender in Fashion, Floral Infatuations, and Their Dream Beauty Project," 14 Nov. 2018 And that, archaeologists say, means that even relatively small, mobile groups of hunter-gatherers can have a bigger environmental impact than they’ve been given credit for. Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica, "Native Americans managed the prairie for better bison hunts," 25 July 2018 Thanks to a 30 percent tax credit for production companies passed in 2008, Hollywood has officially descended upon Georgia—making it the third-busiest filmmaking location behind Los Angeles and New York City. Matthew Monagan, Condé Nast Traveler, "Road Trip: 3 Days in Georgia, the Hollywood of the South," 20 July 2018 Millennials feel they’re being held back...by their credit score that is. Adam Shell, USA TODAY, "Credit card holders at JPMorgan rush to cash in their rewards points," 13 July 2018 The $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles is set to start phasing out for the Model S, Model X, and Model 3 after Dec. 31, according to the company’s website. Fortune, "Tesla Buyers Hear Clock Ticking as $7,500 Credit Phases Out," 12 July 2018 The public funding includes a state brownfield loan of $1.5 million, state and federal historic tax credits of $3.6 million and a $2.8 million loan from the Capital Region Development Authority. Kenneth R. Gosselin, courant.com, "Renovations Begin In Last Major Structure At Hartford's Colt Complex," 11 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Walker and Gray grew up together in the Co-op City housing development, and Walker credits learning how to cook with keeping him out of trouble and thus saving his life. Howie Kahn, WSJ, "Ghetto Gastro Opens Labyrinth 1.1, Their New HQ in the Bronx," 7 Jan. 2019 There’s been a bit of shifting in terms of who’s credited for what on the project. Devon Maloney, The Verge, "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse directors on the film’s gorgeous style," 17 Dec. 2018 Cukor and Fleming likely earned their spots because of their association with Gone with the Wind, while five of the men credited for The Wizard of Oz ranked among the top eight directors. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Complex networks study ranks the most influential films of all time," 3 Dec. 2018 Women’s clothing brand Aritzia reported record earnings this past quarter, and already, company executives and analysts are crediting the Canadian label’s recent success to a former Toronto resident: Meghan Markle. Rachel King, Fortune, "Meghan Markle Is Being Credited With Boosting Aritzia's Earnings. But Is the 'Meghan Effect' Real?," 13 July 2018 Many credit him with swinging votes to get Bach elected in 2013. Stephen Wade, The Seattle Times, "Olympic ‘kingmaker’ Sheikh Ahmad leaves to handle court case," 28 Nov. 2018 Milk soon fell in love with the fantastical worlds of Dr. Seuss and Daniel Pinkwater, and credits them for helping him overcome his dyslexia. Lizzie Garrett Mettler, Vogue, "With Wonderscope, a Tech Company Attempts the Unthinkable: Healthy Screen Time for Kids," 14 Nov. 2018 Markle's wedding moment reinvigorated the classic trend and many have credited her for its resurgence since May. Her dress, a custom creation by Clare Waight Keller for Givenchy, gave a nod to 1950s film actress Audrey Hepburn. Chrissy Rutherford, Harper's BAZAAR, "Was This German Royal Inspired by Meghan Markle's Wedding Dress?," 24 Oct. 2018 Her dad credits her with brining him down to Earth. Lauren Hubbard, Town & Country, "Who Is Princess Eugenie's Bridesmaid, Theodora Williams?," 12 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'credit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of credit

Noun

1529, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Verb

circa 1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for credit

Noun

Middle French, from Old Italian credito, from Latin creditum something entrusted to another, loan, from neuter of creditus, past participle of credere to believe, entrust — more at creed

Verb

partly from credit entry 1; partly from Latin creditus, past participle — see credit entry 1

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Statistics for credit

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for credit

The first known use of credit was in 1529

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More Definitions for credit

credit

noun

Financial Definition of credit

What It Is

Credit is an agreement whereby a financial institution agrees to lend a borrower a maximum amount of money over a given time period. Interest is typically charged on the outstanding balance.

In the accounting world, a credit is also a journal entry reflecting an increase in assets.

How It Works

Credit cards and home equity lines are examples of credit. Your bar tab is another form of credit.

Not all lines of credit are alike. The borrower's creditworthiness and relationship with the lender affect the terms of the lending agreement, as does bank competition, prevailing market conditions and the size of the line in question. Some lenders apply fixed amortization rates to outstanding balances on a line of credit, while some permit interest-only payments for a time, followed by a lump-sum payment of the principal. If the lender has the right to demand repayment at any time, this is called demand credit.

As with any debt, a wide array of specific terms and requirements may apply to a line of credit. It is common in a revolving line of credit, for example, for the lender to charge a company a commitment fee to keep the unborrowed portion of the line available to the borrower. Lenders also may require a compensating balance, liens on the borrower's assets or collateral on a percentage of the line. This is called securing the line. Some lines of credit are unsecured and are thus not backed by specific assets (this often the case with credit cards). Interest rates on unsecured lines are generally higher than secured lines to compensate the lender for the added risk in the event of a default.

Why It Matters

Credit gives borrowers the ability to purchase goods and services (or for companies, credit gives borrowers the ability to invest in projects) that they normally might not be able to afford. By lending the money, creditors make money by charging interest while helping borrowers pursue their projects. However, as many people have learned the hard way, taking on too much debt can cause a lifetime of damage.

Source: Investing Answers

credit

noun

English Language Learners Definition of credit

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: money that a bank or business will allow a person to use and then pay back in the future

: a record of how well you have paid your bills in the past

: an amount of money that is added to an account

credit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of credit (Entry 2 of 2)

: to add (an amount of money) to a total

: to add money to (an account)

: to give honor or recognition to (someone or something) for doing something or for making something happen

credit

noun
cred·​it | \ ˈkre-dət \

Kids Definition of credit

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : recognition or honor received for some quality or work A doctor was given credit for the discovery. She got extra credit for her report.
2 : the balance in an account in a person's favor
3 : money or goods or services allowed to a person by a bank or business with the expectation of payment later
4 : good reputation especially for honesty : high standing
5 : a source of honor or pride You are a credit to your school.
6 : a unit of schoolwork I took two credits in Spanish.
7 : belief or trust in the truth of something These rumors deserve no credit.

credit

verb
credited; crediting

Kids Definition of credit (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give recognition or honor to for something The team credited their coach for the championship.
2 : to place something in a person's favor on (a business account) We will credit your account with ten dollars.
3 : believe sense 2 Don't credit a statement from a stranger.

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credit

noun
cred·​it

Legal Definition of credit 

(Entry 1 of 2)

2a : the balance in an account which may be drawn upon and repaid later — compare loan
b : the use of resources (as money) in the present obtained by the debtor's promise to repay the creditor in the future usually with interest as compensation to the creditor and often secured by a pledge of property or the right to attach the debtor's income in case of a failure to repay — see also consumer credit — compare debt
c : financial reputation to borrow money on the credit of the United StatesU.S. Constitution art. I
3a : a deduction from an expense or asset account
b : a reduction of an amount otherwise due especially : tax credit a credit for child-care expenses — compare deduction, exclusion, exemption

Legal Definition of credit (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to supply goods on credit to
2 : to trust in the truth of
3a : to enter upon the credit side of an account
b : to place an amount to the credit of credit his account with ten dollars

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More from Merriam-Webster on credit

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with credit

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for credit

Spanish Central: Translation of credit

Nglish: Translation of credit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of credit for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about credit

Comments on credit

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