loan

noun
\ˈlōn \

Definition of loan 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : money lent at interest took out a loan to pay for the new car

b : something lent usually for the borrower's temporary use

2a : the grant of temporary use Can I have the loan of your car?

b : the temporary duty of a person transferred to another job for a limited time He had been on loan to the navy during the war.

3 : loanword The word "nosh" is a loan from Yiddish.

loan

verb
loaned; loaning; loans

Definition of loan (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from loan

Verb

loanable \ ˈlō-​nə-​bəl \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for loan

Synonyms: Verb

advance, lend

Antonyms: Verb

borrow

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Loan vs. Lend: Usage Guide

Verb

The verb loan is one of the words English settlers brought to America and continued to use after it had died out in Britain. Its use was soon noticed by British visitors and somewhat later by the New England literati, who considered it a bit provincial. It was flatly declared wrong in 1870 by a popular commentator, who based his objection on etymology. A later scholar showed that the commentator was ignorant of Old English and thus unsound in his objection, but by then it was too late, as the condemnation had been picked up by many other commentators. Although a surprising number of critics still voice objections, loan is entirely standard as a verb. You should note that it is used only literally; lend is the verb used for figurative expressions, such as "lending a hand" or "lending enchantment."

Examples of loan in a Sentence

Noun

He got a car loan. He'll need several more years to pay off the rest of the loan. She needed money, so she asked her friend for a loan.

Verb

The National Gallery has been kind enough to loan this painting to our museum. His mother loaned him the money to buy a new car. Can you loan me $20?
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

When free cash flow is negative, a company needs a source of outside capital—either taking out loans or selling shares—to finance continued spending. Timothy B. Lee, Ars Technica, "Why almost everyone was wrong about Tesla’s cash flow situation," 26 Oct. 2018 His next one, Valor Equity — established in 2001 thanks to some sweet, sweet government loans — first dealt with wrinkle cream marketers, rope factories and makers of plastic payment cards, according to the FT. Elizabeth Lopatto, The Verge, "If James Murdoch is the new Tesla chairman, that’s bad news for Elon Musk," 12 Oct. 2018 Students next year will see a tuition increase to help the school repay that loan, Boonstra said. Meredith Colias-pete, Post-Tribune, "New Illiana Christian High School set to open in August," 13 July 2018 As for him, Levin has been running Lean & Green Michigan, which helps municipalities set up special assessment districts through which businesses — which pay the assessments — can get long-term, low-cost loans to make energy-use improvements. Todd Spangler, Detroit Free Press, "Andy Levin looks to take dad Sander Levin's seat in Congress," 13 July 2018 The plans receiving loans would be required to pay 100 percent of retirees’ benefits. Edward Mckinley, kansascity, "KC union retirees join rally in Ohio for pension fix — or is it a bailout?," 13 July 2018 The loan system is often criticised by fans for failing to produce high quality players for clubs and international sides. SI.com, "England's World Cup Success Demonstrates the Importance of the Loan System to Player Development," 12 July 2018 And banks in some countries are still weighed down by bad loans of uncertain quality, making them hard to value as acquisition targets. The Economist, "Why the euro zone hasn’t seen more cross-border bank mergers," 12 July 2018 In the last decade, total student loans have more than doubled from about $600 billion to nearly $1.4 trillion. Derek Thompson, The Atlantic, "Win a Game Show, Pay Off Your Student Debt," 12 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In fact, when Morrison loaned the glasses to a non-color blind friend, the friend also noticed striking enhancement of her color perception. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Spanish scientists: EnChroma glasses won’t fix your color blindness," 6 Nov. 2018 But panel paintings—essentially, 500-year-old furniture—are among the most fragile of artworks, and a show on this scale can only be done at the Kunsthistorisches, whose 12 in-house Bruegel paintings are generally never moved, let alone loaned. J.s. Marcus, WSJ, "Strange and Stirring Bruegel," 7 Sep. 2018 The couple sent a desperate post on Facebook and after several hours, someone from a local fence company loaned them another truck. Fox News, "80 tortoises among refugees from Northern California fire," 3 Aug. 2018 The Stahl family loaned $23 million to the school in its final years and donated $8 million several years prior, documents show. Laura Krantz, BostonGlobe.com, "Mount Ida president blames closure on Lasell College maneuvers," 9 July 2018 The bill also would limit annual interest to 28 percent and fees to 5 percent of the first $400 loaned, or $20. Jessie Balmert, Cincinnati.com, "Payday lending: No vote on controversial bill for now," 27 June 2018 Griebel, the former head of the MetroHartford Alliance, raised about $73,000 and has loaned his campaign another $10,000. Russell Blair, courant.com, "Finance Reports Show Wealthy Businessmen Are Pouring Their Cash Into Outsider Gubernatorial Bids," 12 Apr. 2018 Hart lost his job at City, was loaned to West Ham, then at the end of the season was benched there as well. Victor Mather, New York Times, "World Cup 2018: The Big Names Missing Out," 21 May 2018 Claesson headed down a long ball into the box to Oleg Shatov and the 27-year-old, who was loaned from Zenit in February, hammered the ball home against his parent club from 16 yards out. Afp, chicagotribune.com, "Russia Recap: Zenit slide continues after home loss to Krasnodar," 7 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'loan.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of loan

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for loan

Noun

Middle English lon, from Old Norse lān; akin to Old English lǣn loan, lēon to lend, Latin linquere to leave, Greek leipein

Verb

see loan entry 1

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Statistics for loan

Last Updated

13 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for loan

The first known use of loan was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for loan

loan

noun

Financial Definition of loan

What It Is

In the business world, a loan is an amount borrowed.

How It Works

Let's assume Company XYZ has invented a new product that will revolutionize the widget market. The company is sure there will be demand from billions of people around the world, and therefore it needs to build a new factory. If Company XYZ's funds for constructing the factory were limited to its cash on hand, say $200,000, it certainly could not build the kind of factory it needs to capitalize on this tremendous opportunity and would thus be very limited in its output and profits (and would leave the market wide open for competitors to fill the void). With a loan, however, Company XYZ could build the factory and take advantage of the profit potential of its product. The debt essentially magnifies the profits.

In the business world, bank loans and corporate or government bonds are the most common. For individuals, loans can be personal loans, mortgages or lines of credit.

Why It Matters

A loan is a liability, meaning the lender has a claim on a company’s assets. Loan payments due within one year are generally classified as short-term debt on a company’s balance sheet. Loan payments due in more than one year are considered long-term debt. It is important to note that loans commonly come to mind when one considers liabilities, but not all liabilities are loans. Companies may incur other types of liabilities, including (but not limited to) upcoming payroll, bonuses, legal settlements, payments to vendors, certain derivatives, contracts, certain types of leases, and required stock redemptions. Common balance sheet categories for liabilities include accounts payable, accrued expenses, and debt.

Information about a company’s debt is a key component of accurate financial reporting and a crucial part of thorough financial analysis. Excessive debt can ruin a company but is not always detrimental. The use of debt financing can magnify profits that would have otherwise gone unrealized.

Source: Investing Answers

term loan

noun

Financial Definition of term loan

What It Is

A term loan has a set maturity date and usually has a fixed interest rate.

How It Works

Let's say Company XYZ wants to borrow $1 million to build a factory. It meets with its bank, ABC Bank, to negotiate the loan. The company and the bank agree to a 10-year loan with quarterly payments and a 7% interest rate.

Term loans often mature within 10 years, but this is negotiable. They usually require collateral. Not all banks make term loans, and an existing relationship with a bank is usually helpful.

Why It Matters

Term loans are very common, and they provide a level of certainty to the borrower and the lender. The borrower usually has access to the full amount of principal upfront, knows when to make payments, and knows how much to pay. The lender knows that the principal will be repaid over time on a regular basis.

Source: Investing Answers

loan

noun

English Language Learners Definition of loan

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an amount of money that is given to someone for a period of time with a promise that it will be paid back : an amount of money that is borrowed

: permission to use something for a period of time

loan

verb

English Language Learners Definition of loan (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give (something) to (someone) for a period of time

: to give (money) to (someone) who agrees to pay it back in the future

loan

noun
\ˈlōn \

Kids Definition of loan

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : money given with the understanding that it will be paid back

2 : something given for a time to a borrower That's not mine, it's a loan.

3 : permission to use something for a time May I have the loan of your car?

loan

verb
loaned; loaning

Kids Definition of loan (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give to another for temporary use with the understanding that the same or a like thing will be returned loan a book loan money

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loan

noun

Legal Definition of loan 

1a : money lent at interest

b : something lent usually for the borrower's temporary use

2 : a transfer or delivery of money from one party to another with the express or implied agreement that the sum will be repaid regardless of contingency and usually with interest broadly : the furnishing of something to another party for temporary use with the agreement that it or its equivalent will be returned the leasing of the car was termed a loan

bridge loan

: a short-term loan used as a means of financing a purchase or enterprise prior to obtaining other funds used a bridge loan to purchase a new home prior to the sale of the old one

conventional loan

: a loan for the purchase of real property that is secured by a first mortgage on the property rather than by any federal agency

demand loan

: a loan that is subject to repayment upon demand of the lender

home equity loan

: a loan or line of credit secured by the equity in one's home

called also equity loan, home equity line, home equity line of credit

— see also qualified residence interest at interest sense 5

loan for consumption \ -​kən-​ˈsümp-​shən \

: a loan in which the borrower is obligated to return property of the same kind as that borrowed and consumed used chiefly in the civil law of Louisiana ; — compare bailment, deposit, loan for use in this entry

loan for use

: a loan in which one party lends personal property to another with the understanding that the borrower will return the same property at a future time without compensation for its use : commodatum used chiefly in the civil law of Louisiana ; — compare bailment, deposit, loan for consumption in this entry

participation loan

: a single loan in which two or more lenders participate

term loan

: a loan extended to a business with provisions for repayment according to a schedule of amortization and usually for a period of one to five years and sometimes fifteen years

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