clone

noun
\ˈklōn \

Definition of clone 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the aggregate of genetically identical cells or organisms asexually produced by or from a single progenitor cell or organism

b : an individual grown from a single somatic cell or cell nucleus and genetically identical to it

c : a group of replicas of all or part of a macromolecule and especially DNA clones of identical recombinant DNA sequences

2 : one that appears to be a copy of an original form : duplicate a clone of a personal computer

clone

verb
cloned; cloning

Definition of clone (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to propagate a clone from

2 : to make a copy of

intransitive verb

: to produce a clone

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Other Words from clone

Noun

clonal \ˈklō-nᵊl \ adjective
clonally \-nə-lē \ adverb

Verb

cloner \ˈklō-nər \ noun

Did You Know?

Cloning is the production of a population of genetically identical cells or of organisms asexually produced by a single cell or organism. Cloning is fundamental to most living things, since the body cells of plants and animals are clones that come from a single fertilized egg. More narrowly, the term refers to an individual organism grown from a single body cell of its parent that is genetically identical to the parent. Cloning has been commonplace in horticulture since ancient times — many varieties of plants are cloned simply by obtaining cuttings of their leaves, stems, or roots and replanting them. The body cells of adult humans and other animals are routinely cultured as clones in the laboratory. British researchers achieved the first success in cloning an adult mammal in 1996. They produced a lamb, which they named Dolly, using DNA from an adult sheep.

Examples of clone in a Sentence

Noun

the clone of an adult female sheep the car is a clone under a different brand name—it's even manufactured in the same plant as its cousin

Verb

Do you think scientists should clone humans? a plant produced by cloning
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Some create clones of their previous incarnations and stick them all in one surreal music video. refinery29.com, "Taylor Swift Is A Low-Key Freak, Says Lena Dunham," 11 July 2018 And the genome is what has allowed researchers to confirm that crayfish from around the world are essentially clones. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Mutant crayfish got rid of males, and its clones are taking over the world," 6 Feb. 2018 Self-fertilization, on the other hand, produces clones exclusively. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian, "Alternatives to Heterosexual Pairings, Brought to You By Non-Human Animals," 28 June 2018 For one thing, there's no guarantee her clone would have her exact personality. CBS News, "Should you clone your dog?," 8 Apr. 2018 Otherwise, someone could extract information about the state of the original qubit without affecting it, simply by measuring its clone. Davide Castelvecchi, Scientific American, "The Quantum Internet Has Arrived (and It Hasn’t)," 16 Feb. 2018 But the authors of the new study think their new clones could change things. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "These baby monkeys are first cloned primates created using the Dolly method," 24 Jan. 2018 There's even an epic light saber battle between Gumby and his clone. Stacey Grant, Seventeen, "12 Nostalgic Movies You Need To Binge-Watch On Amazon Prime STAT," 15 Aug. 2017 Most important to note: Since Leonie's babies are essentially her clones, all three of the pups are girl sharks. Sarah Schreiber, Good Housekeeping, "Female Shark Gets Pregnant on Her Own, Is the Ultimate Heartbreaker," 18 Jan. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In 2017 Baidu, a Chinese technology firm, published details of a similar voice-cloning system called Deep Voice, which works with as little as three seconds’ worth of training data. The Economist, "What if AI made actors immortal?," 5 July 2018 Some critics consider cloning another act of denial in a long line of them—denying even the finality of extinction. Brooke Jarvis, The New Yorker, "The Obsessive Search for the Tasmanian Tiger," 16 Jan. 2012 That means cloning terrible lizards, arranging gift shops and restaurants for audiences, and keeping your corporate departments happy. Steven Strom, Ars Technica, "Jurassic World Evolution," 19 June 2018 In principle, Poo said, the feat means humans can be cloned. Time, "Scientists Have Cloned Monkeys for the First Time. Are Humans Next?," 24 Jan. 2018 So, the Swiss investment bank decided to clone him, digitally at least. Mckenna Moore, Fortune, "UBS Digitally Cloned Its Chief Economist So He Wouldn't Miss His Meetings," 5 July 2018 Being able to clone themselves, in effect, might allow big stars to take an even bigger share of the pie. The Economist, "What if AI made actors immortal?," 5 July 2018 Commodity goods like paper towels, exercise mats, and power strips can be easily cloned at a fraction of the cost. New York Times, "Amazon, the Brand Buster," 23 June 2018 The devil, Tasmania’s other iconic species, is suffering from a contagious and fatal facial cancer that essentially clones itself when the devils bite one another’s faces. Brooke Jarvis, The New Yorker, "The Obsessive Search for the Tasmanian Tiger," 16 Jan. 2012

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'clone.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of clone

Noun

1903, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1930, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for clone

Noun

Greek klōn twig, slip; akin to Greek klan to break — more at clast

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Dictionary Entries near clone

clomipramine

clomp

clonazepam

clone

clonidine

clonk

Clonmel

Statistics for clone

Last Updated

9 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for clone

The first known use of clone was in 1903

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More Definitions for clone

clone

noun

English Language Learners Definition of clone

 (Entry 1 of 2)

biology : a plant or animal that is grown from one cell of its parent and that has exactly the same genes as its parent

: a product (such as a computer) that is a copy of another product produced by a well-known company

: a person or thing that appears to be an exact copy of another person or thing

clone

verb

English Language Learners Definition of clone (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make an exact copy of (a person, animal, or plant) : to make a clone of (something or someone)

clone

noun
\ˈklōn \

Medical Definition of clone 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the aggregate of genetically identical cells or organisms asexually produced by a single progenitor cell or organism

2 : an individual grown from a single somatic cell or cell nucleus and genetically identical to it

3 : a group of replicas of all or part of a macromolecule and especially DNA

Other Words from clone

clonal \ˈklōn-ᵊl \ adjective
clonally \-ᵊl-ē \ adverb

clone

verb
cloned; cloning

Medical Definition of clone (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to propagate a clone from frogs have been successfully cloned by transplanting nuclei from body cells to enucleated eggs

intransitive verb

: to produce a clone

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More from Merriam-Webster on clone

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for clone

Spanish Central: Translation of clone

Nglish: Translation of clone for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of clone for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about clone

Comments on clone

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