prestige

noun

pres·​tige pre-ˈstēzh How to pronounce prestige (audio)
-ˈstēj
often attributive
1
: standing or estimation in the eyes of people : weight or credit in general opinion
2
: commanding position in people's minds
prestigeful adjective
Choose the Right Synonym for prestige

influence, authority, prestige, weight, credit mean power exerted over the minds or behavior of others.

influence may apply to a force exercised and received consciously or unconsciously.

used her influence to get the bill passed

authority implies the power of winning devotion or allegiance or of compelling acceptance and belief.

his opinions lacked authority

prestige implies the ascendancy given by conspicuous excellence or reputation for superiority.

the prestige of the newspaper

weight implies measurable or decisive influence in determining acts or choices.

their wishes obviously carried much weight

credit suggests influence that arises from the confidence of others.

his credit with the press

Examples of prestige in a Sentence

Her career as a diplomat has brought her enormous prestige. The job has low pay and low prestige. The family has wealth and social prestige.
Recent Examples on the Web The fact that the markets trade in play money doesn’t seem to matter—users are sufficiently motivated by the prestige of accruing Mana. Will Henshall, TIME, 14 Feb. 2024 In the world of ultra-luxury sedans, the Bentley Flying Spur offers more athleticism than the Rolls-Royce Ghost yet more prestige and customizability than the Mercedes-Maybach S580. Kyle Edward, Forbes, 12 Feb. 2024 Indeed, given the high cost of live-action content, animators in Canada can provide the type of high-end shows viewers have come to expect without the exorbitant budgets that prestige TV normally calls for. Etan Vlessing, The Hollywood Reporter, 10 Feb. 2024 This order represents a huge hit to the prestige of the presidency. Benjamin Weinthal, Fox News, 4 Feb. 2024 Wine appreciation has skyrocketed in recent years – along with the prestige of U.S. winemakers. Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 To mark a year filled with prestige and power, organizations in Sacramento area are hosting a variety of events. Emma Hall, Sacramento Bee, 29 Jan. 2024 Then there’s Apple’s obsession with prestige hardware. Andrew Williams, WIRED, 4 Feb. 2024 An influx of new buyers increased the value of the market and boosted its prestige. Dylan Sloan, Fortune, 3 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'prestige.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French, from Middle French, conjuror's trick, illusion, from Latin praestigiae, plural, conjuror's tricks, from praestringere to graze, blunt, constrict, from prae- + stringere to bind tight — more at strain

First Known Use

1829, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of prestige was in 1829

Dictionary Entries Near prestige

Cite this Entry

“Prestige.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prestige. Accessed 3 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

prestige

noun
pres·​tige pre-ˈstēzh How to pronounce prestige (audio)
-ˈstēj
: importance in the eyes of other people
prestigious
-ˈstij-əs
adjective
prestigiously adverb
prestigiousness noun
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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