faith

noun
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \
plural faiths\ ˈfāths How to pronounce faiths (audio) , sometimes  ˈfāt͟hz \

Definition of faith

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : allegiance to duty or a person : loyalty lost faith in the company's president
b(1) : fidelity to one's promises
(2) : sincerity of intentions acted in good faith
2a(1) : belief and trust in and loyalty to God
(2) : belief in the traditional doctrines of a religion
b(1) : firm belief in something for which there is no proof clinging to the faith that her missing son would one day return
(2) : complete trust
3 : something that is believed especially with strong conviction especially : a system of religious beliefs the Protestant faith
on faith
: without question took everything he said on faith

faith

verb
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \
faithed; faithing; faiths

Definition of faith (Entry 2 of 2)

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Synonyms & Antonyms for faith

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for faith

Noun

belief, faith, credence, credit mean assent to the truth of something offered for acceptance. belief may or may not imply certitude in the believer. my belief that I had caught all the errors faith almost always implies certitude even where there is no evidence or proof. an unshakable faith in God credence suggests intellectual assent without implying anything about grounds for assent. a theory now given credence by scientists credit may imply assent on grounds other than direct proof. gave full credit to the statement of a reputable witness

Examples of faith in a Sentence

Noun Faith without doubt leads to moral arrogance, the eternal pratfall of the religiously convinced. — Joe Klein, Time, 17 May 2004 Nick wiped at the moustache of sweat droplets that was as much a part of his face as his eyes and nose and gave a shrug that indicated a certain lack of faith in our judgment. — Tom Perrotta, Joe College, 2000 But while no one with a grain of sense trusted Miss Stephanie, Jem and I had considerable faith in Miss Maudie. She had never told on us, had never played cat-and-mouse with us, she was not at all interested in our private lives. She was our friend. — Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1960 His supporters have accepted his claims with blind faith. Our faith in the government has been badly shaken by the recent scandals. Lending him the money to start his own business was an act of faith. It requires a giant leap of faith for us to believe that she is telling the truth. Nothing is more important to her than her faith in God. She says that her faith has given her the courage to deal with this tragedy.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Poetry, faith and family The poet laureate does not watch television. Michael K. Mcintyre, cleveland, "Poetry is her salvation, saving kids is her mission: Honey Bell-Bey’s rise from poverty to poet laureate," 2 Feb. 2020 The hourlong service featured songs of loss and longing as well as a sermon about the struggles and faith of Job from the Bible. Adam Kemp, azcentral, "'It is not fair': Memorial service held for 3 children Phoenix police say were smothered by their mother," 1 Feb. 2020 Tens of thousands of people from different faiths and backgrounds have united against it, in part because the law is seen by critics as part of a larger threat to the secular fabric of Indian society. Washington Post, "India projects rosy economic growth next year after slump," 31 Jan. 2020 Religious sites to remain accessible to all faiths. Andrew Carey, CNN, "Trump's plan gives Israel a green light to annex part of the West Bank. Here's what that looks like," 29 Jan. 2020 Minority faiths are allowed to practice in Iran, which fills the No. Doug Bandow, National Review, "A New Ranking of Nations Where Christians Are Persecuted Most," 28 Jan. 2020 But just four days after ending a 108-day shoot on the director's Netflix film, Koskoff found herself in a scouting van with Todd Phillips, taking a leap of faith with another director. Aaron Couch, The Hollywood Reporter, "Producer Emma Tillinger Koskoff Reveals Which 'Joker' Scene Was Most Stressful to Film," 26 Jan. 2020 Preparing the next generation While her generation has been hard at work in saving and restoring forests, Bisoyi has reposed faith in the next generation to not only take up the mantle but improve on it. Pragati Prava, Quartz India, "An Odisha village woman’s journey from protecting peacocks to the Indian parliament," 26 Jan. 2020 But the point isn’t to reinforce Lester’s rudeness; the goal is to show faith in his ability to be a better version of himself. Sarah Todd, Quartz at Work, "The secret to dealing with cynics at work," 24 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'faith.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of faith

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for faith

Noun

Middle English feith, fei, borrowed from Anglo-French feit, feid, fei, going back to Latin fidēs "trust, guarantee, proof, sincerity, loyalty, belief," going back to *bhid-ēi-, noun derivative from zero-grade of an Indo-European verbal base *bhei̯dh- "entrust, trust," whence Latin fīdere "to trust (in), have confidence (in)," fīdus "faithful," Greek peíthesthai "to obey, comply with, believe," peíthein "to persuade, prevail upon," Albanian be "oath," and probably Old Church Slavic běždǫ, běditi "to compel, constrain," běda "distress, need"

Note: The English word is an early loan from medieval French, first attested in a homily fragment from the 12th century (see feþ in Dictionary of Old English); it appears to preserve the final interdental fricative generally lost in early Old French—a loss reflected in the more common Anglo-French form fei (also loaned into Middle English—see fay entry 2). Indo-European *bhei̯dh- is also usually claimed to be the source of Germanic *bīðan- "to wait" (see bide).

Verb

verbal derivative of faith entry 1

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Time Traveler for faith

Time Traveler

The first known use of faith was in the 13th century

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Statistics for faith

Last Updated

5 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Faith.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/faith. Accessed 18 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for faith

faith

noun
How to pronounce faith (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of faith

: strong belief or trust in someone or something
: belief in the existence of God : strong religious feelings or beliefs
: a system of religious beliefs

faith

noun
\ ˈfāth How to pronounce faith (audio) \

Kids Definition of faith

1 : strong belief or trust I have faith in our leaders.
2 : belief in God
3 : a system of religious beliefs : religion people of all faiths
4 : loyalty to duty or to a person or thing The team's true fans keep the faith.

faith

noun

Legal Definition of faith

1a : allegiance or loyalty to a duty or a person
b : sincerity or honesty of intentions — see also bad faith, good faith
2 : fidelity to one's promises and obligations

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More from Merriam-Webster on faith

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for faith

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with faith

Spanish Central: Translation of faith

Nglish: Translation of faith for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of faith for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about faith

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