esteem

noun
es·​teem | \ i-ˈstēm How to pronounce esteem (audio) \

Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the regard in which one is held especially : high regard the esteem we all feel for her
2 archaic : worth, value
3 archaic : opinion, judgment

esteem

verb
esteemed; esteeming; esteems

Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to set a high value on : regard highly and prize accordingly an esteemed guest
2a : to view as : consider esteem it a privilege
3 archaic : appraise

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Choose the Right Synonym for esteem

Verb

regard, respect, esteem, admire mean to recognize the worth of a person or thing. regard is a general term that is usually qualified. he is highly regarded in the profession respect implies a considered evaluation or estimation. after many years they came to respect her views esteem implies greater warmth of feeling accompanying a high valuation. no citizen of the town was more highly esteemed admire suggests usually enthusiastic appreciation and often deep affection. a friend that I truly admire

Examples of esteem in a Sentence

Noun She has won esteem for her work with cancer patients. an athlete who is held in great esteem by her peers Verb I had esteemed the whole affair to be a colossal waste of time. although the works of the Impressionist painters are esteemed today, they met with scorn when they were introduced
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Over the next few years, his teachers talked about hygiene, self-esteem, boundaries, bullying and puberty. Karina Bland, azcentral, "Kids learn about sex before seventh grade. We should help them get it right," 14 Jan. 2020 The classes help older adults increase self-esteem, social engagement, motor skills and memory function. Joan Rusek, cleveland, "Two art exhibits and one frozen festival offer mid-January fun : Valley Views," 13 Jan. 2020 Both of those things will build Fred's self-esteem and, hopefully, help him to stay sober. Annie Lane | Creators.com, oregonlive, "Dear Annie: Son, 35, cuts off parents after they refuse to take back him and his baggage," 11 Dec. 2019 An Ode to the Fresh Cut, a children’s book about the power of an artful barbershop haircut to boost self-esteem, with illustrations that star young black boys. Ashley Fetters, The Atlantic, "Every Child Can Become a Lover of Books," 15 Oct. 2019 The project addressed training issues across the academic research pipeline, from bolstering the self-esteem of first-year graduate students to facilitating the mentoring activities of senior faculty members. Jeffrey Mervis, Science | AAAS, "From service to science: NIH shifts focus of mentoring network aimed at boosting grantee diversity," 3 Jan. 2020 The esteem of creating a seasonal breakout song -- and the promise of long-term earnings that comes with it -- has been too strong for many artists to resist. Rob Picheta, CNN, "Writing a Christmas hit is big business -- but most artists fall short," 20 Dec. 2019 And if the self-esteem and well-being of children of color does not move us, here’s something else: Children from privileged backgrounds also need to see children from marginalized groups represented on the page. Susan Muaddi Darraj, Twin Cities, "Susan Muaddi Darraj: Black and brown children aren’t represented in children’s books," 15 Dec. 2019 Most of those commitments reflect the esteem that clubs have for those players. BostonGlobe.com, "Gerrit Cole," 13 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The father of democracy in Hong Kong is widely acknowledged to be Martin Lee, whom many of us have esteemed for decades. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "Fighting for Hong Kong," 24 Oct. 2019 Robert Thrasher, a former student now practicing law in New York City, says Mr. Skeel is esteemed at the law school for his work and beloved for his engaging and generous personality. Mary Beth Mccauley, The Christian Science Monitor, "Jealousy at Ivy League level: How a law professor views Tenth Commandment," 23 Dec. 2019 This is the beauty of literature, in fact — and the reason that thoughtful agnostics (such as Jordan Peterson) and clever atheists (like Camille Paglia) so esteem the Bible. Madeleine Kearns, National Review, "The Chilling Case of Dr. Mackereth," 8 Oct. 2019 To you, the flirting was harmless, something to pass the time, or even boost your self esteem a little. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Is Flirting Cheating?," 9 Sep. 2019 Megan Fitzroy Phelan, a veteran of Manhattan’s esteemed Daniel restaurant and Sullivan Street Bakery, creates desserts, only subtly sweet, that are very much to my taste. Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, "In Richmond, two new enchanting reasons to drive and dine," 4 Sep. 2019 What modern Republicans and most gun rights advocates have forgotten is that the right to bear arms was always weighed against another right the Founders esteemed highly: the peace. Saul Cornell, The New Republic, "The Second-Amendment Case for Gun Control," 4 Aug. 2019 Texan Beto O’Rourke didn’t think to mention his state’s esteemed former Gov. Ann Richards. Monica Hesse, Washington Post, "The ‘Wife Guys’ of the 2020 presidential race," 20 June 2019 As the night's end neared, industry legend Clive Davis made the presentation for the Johnny Mercer Award -- an award so esteemed that only songwriters already in the SHOF are eligible to receive it -- to Carole Bayer Sager. Ed Christman, Billboard, "At 50, Songwriters Hall of Fame Ceremony Focuses on Creator Recognition With Star-Studded Event," 14 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'esteem.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of esteem

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

History and Etymology for esteem

Verb

Middle English estemen to estimate, from Anglo-French estimer, from Latin aestimare

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Time Traveler for esteem

Time Traveler

The first known use of esteem was in the 14th century

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Statistics for esteem

Last Updated

12 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Esteem.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/esteem. Accessed 17 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for esteem

esteem

noun
How to pronounce esteem (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal
: respect and affection

esteem

verb

English Language Learners Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to think very highly or favorably of (someone or something)

esteem

noun
es·​teem | \ i-ˈstēm How to pronounce esteem (audio) \

Kids Definition of esteem

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: respect and affection Her work with children has won her esteem.

esteem

verb
esteemed; esteeming

Kids Definition of esteem (Entry 2 of 2)

: to think favorably of He was esteemed as a man of generosity.

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More from Merriam-Webster on esteem

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for esteem

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with esteem

Spanish Central: Translation of esteem

Nglish: Translation of esteem for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of esteem for Arabic Speakers

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