admire

verb
ad·​mire | \ əd-ˈmī(-ə)r How to pronounce admire (audio) \
admired; admiring

Definition of admire

transitive verb

1 : to feel respect and approval for (someone or something) : to regard with admiration They all admired her courage.
2 archaic : to marvel at

intransitive verb

dialect : to like very much … I would admire to know why not …— A. H. Lewis

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Other Words from admire

admirer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for admire

regard, respect, esteem, admire mean to recognize the worth of a person or thing. regard is a general term that is usually qualified. he is highly regarded in the profession respect implies a considered evaluation or estimation. after many years they came to respect her views esteem implies greater warmth of feeling accompanying a high valuation. no citizen of the town was more highly esteemed admire suggests usually enthusiastic appreciation and often deep affection. a friend that I truly admire

Examples of admire in a Sentence

We gazed out the window and admired the scenery. I admire the way you handled such a touchy situation.

Recent Examples on the Web

Hicks removed the dividing walls so that the room, running about 88 feet long and trisected by Corinthian columns, could be admired in all its splendor. Robert O'byrne, ELLE Decor, "Tour a Legendary Manor in Northern Ireland," 12 Oct. 2018 For Naomi, who had grown up watching and admiring Serena, these words meant a lot. Harleen Sidhu, Teen Vogue, "10 Celebrities on How Serena Williams Inspires Them," 12 Dec. 2018 The Moochie whom Bailey admired as a child was an older brother who stood up to their abusive father and whose checks from the Army helped to sustain the family after their parents divorced. John Eligon, New York Times, "After His Brother Commits Murder, a Journalist Revisits Their Childhood," 6 July 2018 The thrill of dreamed-of European cities and admired fellow writers was also cruel in its way, since the years that Neruda spent in the Far East would be lonely ones. Benjamin Kunkel, The New Republic, "The partisan world of Pablo Neruda," 2 July 2018 Paris for just walking around and admiring the beauty. Alexandra Ilyashov, WSJ, "Fashion Week Set Design: Three Top Designers Reveal Their Inspiration," 14 Feb. 2019 The style first came to America after World War I, after soldiers who had glimpsed and admired the grand chateaux and quaint farmhouses in rural France returned and built homes in a similar style. Maggie Burch, House Beautiful, "French Provincial Design Has Always Set the Bar For Casual Elegance," 11 Jan. 2019 Here’s an account that blends steamy lingerie spreads with astrology — and here’s one exclusively for admiring men’s sculpted butts. Casey Newton, The Verge, "Google’s appearance before Congress will mark a turning point for its CEO," 5 Dec. 2018 Yes, the colors are pretty and nice to admire, but there's just something so satisfying about running your hands over the smooth silk and soft velvet. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Why Do Couples Hold Hands?," 4 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'admire.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of admire

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

History and Etymology for admire

borrowed from Middle French admirer, Latinization of amirer "to make (little or much) of," borrowed from Latin admīrārī, ammīrārī "to regard with wonder, show esteem for," from ad- ad- + mīrārī "to be surprised, look with wonder at," derivative of mīrus, "remarkable, amazing," of uncertain origin

Note: Regarding etymology of Latin mīrus see note at smile entry 1.

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Statistics for admire

Last Updated

18 Mar 2019

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Time Traveler for admire

The first known use of admire was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for admire

admire

verb
ad·​mire | \ əd-ˈmīr How to pronounce admire (audio) \
admired; admiring

Kids Definition of admire

: to think very highly of : feel admiration for

Other Words from admire

admirer noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on admire

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with admire

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for admire

Spanish Central: Translation of admire

Nglish: Translation of admire for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of admire for Arabic Speakers

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