expire

verb

ex·​pire ik-ˈspī(-ə)r How to pronounce expire (audio)
 usually for intransitive sense 3 and transitive sense 2  ek-
expired; expiring

intransitive verb

1
: to breathe one's last breath : die
2
: to come to an end: such as
a
: to exceed its period of validity
The contract will expire next month.
b
: to pass its expiration date (see expiration date sense 2)
This milk has expired.
" … when drugs expire, you can't just leave these things lying around."Ed Haislmaier
3
: to emit the breath

transitive verb

1
obsolete : conclude
2
: to breathe out from or as if from the lungs
3
archaic : emit

Examples of expire in a Sentence

My driver's license has expired. She expired after a long illness. measuring the volume of air expired from the lungs
Recent Examples on the Web Davies, too, is a masterpiece of patience: Real Madrid will present Bayern Munich with the choice of losing him for a fee this summer, or for nothing when his contract expires in 2025. Rory Smith, New York Times, 5 Apr. 2024 The awards had been held on the eve of Nashville’s CMA Fest in June since 2002, but when CBS’ contract with the ACM Awards expired, the network rescheduled subsidiary CMT’s ceremony as a spring event. Tom Roland, Billboard, 5 Apr. 2024 The river’s largest reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, remain at low levels despite a series of water-saving agreements, and the region’s water managers have been engaged in difficult negotiations on new rules for dealing with shortages after 2026, when the current rules expire. Tribune News Service, The Mercury News, 4 Apr. 2024 Advertisement The decals issued since 2022 are set to expire when the state law does, on Sept. 30, 2025. Karen Garcia, Los Angeles Times, 4 Apr. 2024 Since generic versions are produced after the patent on brand-name drugs expires, they can be manufactured and sold at a fraction of the price without compromising quality or effectiveness. Amber Smith, Discover Magazine, 3 Apr. 2024 But 20 years after the first SawStop was sold, most of those patents have now expired. Chris Arnold, NPR, 2 Apr. 2024 This showrunner is now trying to figure out how to pay his mortgage after his overall deal expired and as his projects sit in limbo. Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter, 2 Apr. 2024 Their initial terms were scheduled to expire at the company’s 2025 annual meeting of stockholders. Todd Spangler, Variety, 1 Apr. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'expire.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Anglo-French espirer to breathe out, from Latin exspirare, from ex- + spirare to breathe

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of expire was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near expire

Cite this Entry

“Expire.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expire. Accessed 18 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

expire

verb
ex·​pire ik-ˈspī(ə)r How to pronounce expire (audio)
 usually for sense 3  ek-
expired; expiring
1
: to breathe one's last breath : die
2
: to come to an end : be no longer in force
this offer expires March 1
my driver's license has expired
3
a
: to let the breath out
b
: to breathe out from or as if from the lungs

Medical Definition

expire

verb
ex·​pire
ik-ˈspī(ə)r, usually for vi 2 and vt ek-
expired; expiring

intransitive verb

1
: to breathe one's last breath : die
2
: to emit the breath

transitive verb

: to breathe out from or as if from the lungs
the basal metabolism test … measures the amount of carbon dioxide expired by the lungsJ. D. Ratcliff

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