interdict

noun
in·​ter·​dict | \ˈin-tər-ˌdikt \

Definition of interdict 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical censure withdrawing most sacraments and Christian burial from a person or district

2 : a prohibitory decree

interdict

verb
in·​ter·​dict | \ˌin-tər-ˈdikt \
interdicted; interdicting; interdicts

Definition of interdict (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to lay under or prohibit by an interdict

2 : to forbid in a usually formal or authoritative manner

3a : to destroy, damage, or cut off (something, such as an enemy line of supply) by firepower to stop or hamper an enemy

b : intercept sense 1a interdict drug shipments

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Other Words from interdict

Verb

interdiction \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈdik-​shən \ noun
interdictive \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈdik-​tiv \ adjective
interdictor \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈdik-​tər \ noun
interdictory \ ˌin-​tər-​ˈdik-​t(ə-​)rē \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for interdict

Synonyms: Noun

ban, embargo, interdiction, prohibition, proscription, veto

Synonyms: Verb

ban, bar, enjoin, forbid, outlaw, prohibit, proscribe

Antonyms: Noun

prescription

Antonyms: Verb

allow, let, permit, suffer

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Choose the Right Synonym for interdict

Verb

forbid, prohibit, interdict, inhibit mean to debar one from doing something or to order that something not be done. forbid implies that the order is from one in authority and that obedience is expected. smoking is forbidden in the building prohibit suggests the issuing of laws, statutes, or regulations. prohibited the sale of liquor interdict implies prohibition by civil or ecclesiastical authority usually for a given time or a declared purpose. practices interdicted by the church inhibit implies restraints or restrictions that amount to prohibitions, not only by authority but also by the exigencies of the time or situation. conditions inhibiting the growth of free trade

Did You Know?

Interdict and interdiction are used for very serious prohibitions—more serious than, say, a professor telling the class that texting is forbidden during lectures. During the Middle Ages and Renaissance, an interdict was a sentence imposed by the powerful Catholic Church forbidding a person or place, and sometimes even an entire country, from receiving church privileges or participating in church functions. Interdict now often means "cut off" in a physically forceful way as well; interdictions are usually targeted at either arms supplies or illegal drug shipments.

Examples of interdict in a Sentence

Noun

the church's controversial interdict against the use of birth control devices

Verb

the state legislature moved to interdict the use of radar-detection devices by motorists federal agents are able to interdict only a small percentage of the narcotic shipments into the country
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

South African Revenue Service Commissioner Tom Moyane will seek a legal interdict against Cyril Ramaphosa if the president does not stop trying to remove him from the tax agency, according to people familiar with the matter. Paul Vecchiatto, Bloomberg.com, "South Africa Tax Chief Threatens Legal Action Over Job," 19 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Finally, the United States will disrupt Iran’s activities, including by interdicting illicit weapons shipments. Missy Ryan, Washington Post, "Pentagon to confront Iran’s expansion using indirect means, not open conflict," 26 Apr. 2018 In the years since, Bahraini authorities have moved to disrupt suspected militant cells and interdict operatives and weapons. Souad Mekhennet, Washington Post, "In Bahrain, a smoldering insurgency reveals the resilience of Iran’s proxy war," 18 May 2018 First, Australia only needs to patrol two narrow sea corridors to interdict all migrant vessels trying to reach its territory, whereas the EU would need to police a line from Malta to Gibraltar—an almost impossible undertaking. Simon Nixon, WSJ, "Europe’s Threadbare Migration Plan Only Buys Time," 2 July 2018 On average, every day, D.H.S. stops or interdicts ten people that are on the terror watch list trying to come into the country. NBC News, "Meet the Press - June 24, 2018," 24 June 2018 In fiscal 2017, Customs and Border Protection interdicted 118 shipments totaling 240 pounds of fentanyl from express consignment carriers and 227 seizures totaling 92 pounds from the international mail, according to recent CBP testimony to Congress. Kristina Davis, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Fentanyl has taken over America's drug market. Where is it coming from?," 17 June 2018 In the Senate, the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen has waded into a debate about whether expanding the DEA’s authority would help interdict some suspicious drug shipments and ultimately help curb the opioid crisis. Lev Facher, STAT, "As opioids legislation gains steam, efforts to address crisis collide with moneyed interests," 7 June 2018 The reversal of the ban represented a rare contradiction by Lebanon's government of a ruling by the country's censorship committee to interdict a film. Washington Post, "World Digest: Jan. 17, 2018," 17 Jan. 2018 In the budget year that ended on Sept. 30, El Centro agents apprehended 18,633 undocumented immigrants and interdicted 5,554 pounds of marijuana, 483 pounds of cocaine and 1,526 pounds of methamphetamines. Carl Prine, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Initial deployment of California troops arrive at the border," 14 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'interdict.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of interdict

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for interdict

Noun

Middle English, alteration of entredite, from Anglo-French, from Latin interdictum prohibition, from neuter of interdictus, past participle of interdicere to interpose, forbid, from inter- + dicere to say — more at diction

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Time Traveler for interdict

The first known use of interdict was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for interdict

interdict

noun
in·​ter·​dict | \ˈint-ər-ˌdikt \

Medical Definition of interdict 

civil law

: one who has been determined to be incompetent to care for his or her own person or affairs (as by reason of mental incapacity)

interdict

noun
in·​ter·​dict | \ˈin-tər-ˌdikt \

Legal Definition of interdict 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that prohibits

2 : one that has been interdicted — compare ward

interdict

transitive verb
in·​ter·​dict | \ˌin-tər-ˈdikt \

Legal Definition of interdict (Entry 2 of 2)

1 in the civil law of Louisiana : to deprive (a person) of the right to care for one's own person or affairs because of mental incapacity — compare commit, curator, tutor

2 : to authoritatively prohibit or bar (an act or conduct)

3 : to intercept or cut off (as a drug shipment) by force

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