tutor

noun
tu·tor | \ ˈtü-tər , ˈtyü- \

Definition of tutor 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a person charged with the instruction and guidance of another: such as

a : a private teacher

b : a teacher in a British university who gives individual instruction to undergraduates

tutor

verb
tutored; tutoring; tutors

Definition of tutor (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to teach or guide usually individually in a special subject or for a particular purpose : coach

2 : to have the guardianship, tutelage, or care of

intransitive verb

1 : to do the work of a tutor

2 : to receive instruction especially privately

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Examples of tutor in a Sentence

Noun

I got a tutor to help me with my homework. He is a tutor in European history.

Verb

She earned extra money tutoring in the evening. bought a video series designed to tutor a person in the fine art of decorating cakes
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Apart from its colorful grandfather clock that tutors built out of K’nex toys, the center is a drab room full of computers and faux wood tables. Marcella Bombardieri, The Atlantic, "One College's Struggle to Get Poor Students Through School," 30 May 2018 Her education probably began accidentally when tutors came by to instruct her younger brothers. Evelyn Lamb, Smithsonian, "The 18th-Century Lady Mathematician Who Loved Calculus and God," 16 May 2018 Borland said a tutor meets with the same students for 20 minutes each day for an extended period. Alan J. Borsuk, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Borsuk: Wisconsin Reading Corp tutors combat literacy crisis one child at a time," 11 May 2018 In addition to working on aid projects in Nigeria and Nicaragua, Nessralla, 30, tutors high school kids and has volunteered at Best Buddies, a charity for the developmentally disabled; his buddy is a 60-year-old named Kevin. Yvonne Abraham, BostonGlobe.com, "For these overachievers, tuition is their latest obstacle," 5 May 2018 Missouri athletic director Jim Sterk recently sent a letter to Yolanda Kumar, a former tutor for the athletic department, that indicates her claims of academic fraud made in 2016 were true. Alex Schiffer, kansascity, "Mizzou AD's letter: Investigation found former tutor's academic fraud claims were true | The Kansas City Star," 27 Apr. 2018 If the tutor balks at telling you, that should tell you something. Gerald Bradshaw, Post-Tribune, "Devote ample study time to SAT," 30 Mar. 2018 The summer tutor program will be moved to the Covedale branch. Scott Wartman, Cincinnati.com, "Ceiling damage closes library's Price Hill branch," 11 July 2018 Faced with students who needed to grow multiple grade levels in a single school year, most teachers at the school worked late into the evening and even showed up on Saturdays to tutor students or to catch up on grading or lesson plans, Vowels said. Mandy Mclaren, The Courier-Journal, "Should JCPS pay teachers more if they work in low-performing schools?," 23 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The compact whiskey museum traces the development and lineage of the nation’s 900-year-old drink with artifacts used in its production, rare bottles, tutored tastings, and yes, live stories. Tara Nurin, Philly.com, "In Dublin, a story of whiskey is more than just one night at the pub," 8 June 2018 With the success of Atonement, Ronan left school and began to juggle home tutoring with an intense work schedule. Jamie Hawkesworth, Vogue, "Saoirse Ronan on Growing Up on Camera, the Changing Politics of Ireland, and Becoming a Queen," 11 July 2018 His only coaching qualifications are a backyard apprenticeship tutoring his niece and her friends, along with a course in soccer fundamentals. Matt Blomberg, latimes.com, "There's a reason that the soccer team rescued from a cave in Thailand was so tough and resilient," 11 July 2018 Paul and Ed: Blessed with the best formal educations of any of the characters, Madigan’s tutoring Paul and Phillips’ lawyering Ed are two sides of the same coin. Mike Fischer, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'Born Yesterday' heroine calls her own shots in American Players Theatre remake," 26 June 2018 About half who reported earning second incomes were employed in outside teaching or tutoring positions. Moriah Balingit, Washington Post, "How bad is teacher pay? Nearly 1 in 5 teachers works a second job, report says," 20 June 2018 That first summer without a building was when Beacon Place began offering basic math and reading tutoring to 10 to 14 students, LaFasto added. Emily K. Coleman, Lake County News-Sun, "Beacon Place expands into new two-story building in Waukegan," 19 June 2018 That can be anything from tutoring someone to driving new refugees around the city to simply speaking English with someone to help improve their language skills. Lainey Seyler, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "International music and dance come to the Westown Farmers Market for Milwaukee's World Refugee Day," 20 June 2018 But Reich certainly has a way of running things, a style shaped from his 30 years in football, from backing up Jim Kelly in Buffalo to quarterbacking the expansion Carolina Panthers to tutoring Peyton Manning in Indy. Zak Keefer, Indianapolis Star, "Insider: 2 days in, Frank Reich speeding life up for Colts," 25 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tutor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tutor

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

History and Etymology for tutor

Noun

Middle English tutour, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin tutor, from tueri

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Statistics for tutor

Last Updated

12 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for tutor

The first known use of tutor was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for tutor

tutor

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tutor

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a teacher who works with one student

: a teacher at a British university who works with one student or a small group of students

tutor

verb

English Language Learners Definition of tutor (Entry 2 of 2)

: to teach a single student : to teach someone as a tutor

tutor

noun
tu·tor | \ ˈtü-tər , ˈtyü- \

Kids Definition of tutor

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a teacher who works with an individual student

tutor

verb
tutored; tutoring

Kids Definition of tutor (Entry 2 of 2)

: to teach usually individually

tutor

noun
tu·tor | \ ˈtü-tər, ˈtyü-tər \

Legal Definition of tutor 

in the civil law of Louisiana : a guardian of a minor or sometimes of a person with mental retardation — compare committee, conservator, curator

Other words from tutor

tutorship noun

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Comments on tutor

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