educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt How to pronounce educate (audio) \
educated; educating

Definition of educate

transitive verb

1a : to provide schooling for chose to educate their children at home
b : to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession
2a : to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction
b : to provide with information : inform educating themselves about changes in the industry
3 : to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way educate the public to support our position

intransitive verb

: to educate a person or thing

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Choose the Right Synonym for educate

teach, instruct, educate, train, discipline, school mean to cause to acquire knowledge or skill. teach applies to any manner of imparting information or skill so that others may learn. taught us a lot about our planet instruct suggests methodical or formal teaching. instructs raw recruits in military drill educate implies development of the mind. more things than formal schooling serve to educate a person train stresses instruction and drill with a specific end in view. trained foreign pilots to operate the new aircraft discipline implies training in habits of order and precision. a disciplined mind school implies training or disciplining especially in what is hard to master. schooled the horse in five gaits

Examples of educate in a Sentence

Parents trust schools to educate their children. The job of our public schools is to educate.

Recent Examples on the Web

That’s why on November 8, the GH Institute is teaming up with Made Safe, an organization that educates consumers and companies about nontoxic ingredients, to host the second Raise the Green Bar Summit. The Good Housekeeping Institute, Good Housekeeping, "Here's everything you need to know about the 2018 Raise the Green Bar Sustainability Summit.," 16 Oct. 2018 What is wrong with a cabdriver, or anyone else for that matter, wishing to be better educated? WSJ, "Free College Would Create Better Educated Citizens," 31 Jan. 2019 The students, many of whom hear about the program through social media, are well-educated (backgrounds range from engineering to journalism), but live in rural areas with limited job prospects. Pilar Guzmán, Condé Nast Traveler, "South Africa’s Other Big Five," 20 Dec. 2018 Well: Benjamin Button actually had a rare disease; educate yourself. Monica Heisey, Glamour, "My Number One Skin-Care Tip? Get Divorced," 27 Nov. 2018 Born in 1713, the son of an enterprising metalsmith, Diderot was brought up in Langres, a cathedral town north of Dijon, where he was educated by the Jesuits. Dan Hofstadter, WSJ, "‘Diderot’ Review: Wherever His Mind Led Him," 15 Feb. 2019 The Duke of York was educated by a governess before attending Heatherdown School in Ascot and eventually, like his brother and father, Gordonstoun. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "Inside Queen Elizabeth's Complicated Relationships With Her Children," 18 Aug. 2018 The National Comprehensive Cancer Network offers guidelines for identifying, educating and testing patients who are at high risk for breast cancer. Philly.com, "Can teenage girls get breast masses?," 9 July 2018 As the school’s first principal, the district hired a charismatic man named Demetrius Hobson who was educated at Morehouse and Harvard and had been a principal in Chicago’s public schools. Daniel Duane, WIRED, "How the Startup Mentality Failed Kids in San Francisco," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'educate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of educate

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for educate

Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe

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Learn More about educate

Dictionary Entries near educate

Educabilia

educable

educand

educate

educated

educatee

education

Statistics for educate

Last Updated

23 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for educate

The first known use of educate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for educate

educate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of educate

: to teach (someone) especially in a school, college, or university
: to give (someone) information about something : to train (someone) to do something

educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt How to pronounce educate (audio) \
educated; educating

Kids Definition of educate

1 : to provide schooling for Her parents are educating her at home.
2 : to develop the mind and morals of especially by formal instruction : teach Teachers work hard to educate their students.
3 : to provide with necessary information The public should be educated about how to save energy.

Other Words from educate

educator \ ˈe-​jə-​ˌkā-​tər \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on educate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with educate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for educate

Spanish Central: Translation of educate

Nglish: Translation of educate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of educate for Arabic Speakers

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