educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt \
educated; educating

Definition of educate

transitive verb

1a : to provide schooling for chose to educate their children at home
b : to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession
2a : to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction
b : to provide with information : inform educating themselves about changes in the industry
3 : to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way educate the public to support our position

intransitive verb

: to educate a person or thing

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Choose the Right Synonym for educate

teach, instruct, educate, train, discipline, school mean to cause to acquire knowledge or skill. teach applies to any manner of imparting information or skill so that others may learn. taught us a lot about our planet instruct suggests methodical or formal teaching. instructs raw recruits in military drill educate implies development of the mind. more things than formal schooling serve to educate a person train stresses instruction and drill with a specific end in view. trained foreign pilots to operate the new aircraft discipline implies training in habits of order and precision. a disciplined mind school implies training or disciplining especially in what is hard to master. schooled the horse in five gaits

Examples of educate in a Sentence

Parents trust schools to educate their children. The job of our public schools is to educate.

Recent Examples on the Web

BBA’s goal is to educate the public on the benefits of honeybees. Mary Lou Cruz, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Coral Springs area events July 18-28," 13 July 2018 Plato laid out the correct way to educate philosopher-kings in The Republic. Bob Morris, Town & Country, "How College Courses on Happiness and Humiliation Became the Hottest Trend on Campus," 11 July 2018 Historical society head and museum curator Bob Grenier said a historian’s role is to educate the public. Lauren Ritchie, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Statue of Confederate general is no 'piece of art,' has no place in Lake County museum," 1 July 2018 Our objective as a school district is to educate kids. Deborah Sullivan Brennan, sandiegouniontribune.com, "State law confirms protections for immigrant students," 30 June 2018 One of my missions is to educate the public and young women about the red flags in dating an abuser. Olivia B. Waxman, Time, "‘He Could Have Killed Me.’ Lorena Bobbitt on Domestic Abuse and What She Wants You To Know About Her Case 25 Years Later," 22 June 2018 According to a village memo, the HPC believes the best way River Forest can preserve its strong architecturally and historically significant properties is to educate the public through efforts like this. Steve Schering, chicagotribune.com, "'Significant properties': Historic commission seeks ways to preserve River Forest homes," 14 June 2018 Talk to people your age about the issues that matter to them and educate others about the state of our government. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Moving On and Making a Difference in the Wake of the Tree of Life Shooting," 2 Nov. 2018 The Democrats’ chief liability with (white, non-college-educated) swing voters on immigration, meanwhile, is not that the party failed to secure the southern border during Barack Obama’s time in office. Eric Leivtz, Daily Intelligencer, "For Democrats, Immigration Is a Political Problem Without a Policy Solution," 2 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'educate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of educate

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for educate

Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe

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Dictionary Entries near educate

Educabilia

educable

educand

educate

educated

educatee

education

Statistics for educate

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for educate

The first known use of educate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for educate

educate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of educate

: to teach (someone) especially in a school, college, or university

: to give (someone) information about something : to train (someone) to do something

educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt \
educated; educating

Kids Definition of educate

1 : to provide schooling for Her parents are educating her at home.
2 : to develop the mind and morals of especially by formal instruction : teach Teachers work hard to educate their students.
3 : to provide with necessary information The public should be educated about how to save energy.

Other Words from educate

educator \ ˈe-​jə-​ˌkā-​tər \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on educate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with educate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for educate

Spanish Central: Translation of educate

Nglish: Translation of educate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of educate for Arabic Speakers

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