outlaw

noun
out·law | \ˈau̇t-ˌlȯ \

Definition of outlaw 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person excluded from the benefit or protection of the law

2a : a lawless person or a fugitive from the law

b : a person or organization under a ban or restriction

c : one that is unconventional or rebellious

3 : an animal (such as a horse) that is wild and unmanageable

outlaw

verb
outlawed; outlawing; outlaws

Definition of outlaw (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to deprive of the benefit and protection of law : declare to be an outlaw

b : to make illegal outlawed dueling

2 : to place under a ban or restriction

3 : to remove from legal jurisdiction or enforcement

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Other Words from outlaw

Noun

outlaw adjective

Verb

outlawry \ˈau̇t-ˌlȯr-ē \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for outlaw

Synonyms: Verb

ban, bar, enjoin, forbid, interdict, prohibit, proscribe

Antonyms: Verb

allow, let, permit, suffer

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Examples of outlaw in a Sentence

Noun

Billy the Kid was one of the most famous outlaws of America's early history.

Verb

That type of gun was outlawed last year. The government passed a bill outlawing the hiring of children under the age of 12.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Those old Western movies—which invented the white hat/black hat dynamic that Westworld borrows—were generally straightforward morality tales, with heroic do-gooders riding into dusty towns to scare off villainous outlaws or savage Indians. Scott Meslow, GQ, "Westworld Is for White People," 7 May 2018 She's rejected freedom to be an outlaw and she's also given up her only plausible piece of leverage. Daniel Fienberg, The Hollywood Reporter, "Critic's Notebook: 'Handmaid's Tale' Finale a Case of Brilliant Acting, Frustrating Storytelling," 11 July 2018 In 1881, outlaw William H. Bonney Jr., alias ‘‘Billy the Kid,’’ was shot and killed by Sheriff Pat Garrett in Fort Sumner in present-day New Mexico. BostonGlobe.com, "This day in history," 14 July 2018 The cliché of the mad artist is such a staple of this genre that what Deluc and Cassel are attempting to dramatize here – a fusing of the outlaw and the artist – can easily be undervalued. Peter Rainer, The Christian Science Monitor, "'Gauguin: Voyage to Tahiti' chronicles Gauguin’s desire to see a new way," 13 July 2018 Right to work outlaws compelling employees to join a union and pay dues as a condition of employment. Allison Kite, kansascity, "Unions give big to block ‘right to work’ in expensive Missouri ballot initiative race," 25 June 2018 The top-tier studio players on the release include Robby Turner, longtime pedal steel guitarist for the late outlaw-country icon Waylon Jennings. Chrissie Dickinson, chicagotribune.com, "Country Lakeshake bringing the best, the brightest and everybody else," 19 June 2018 See, if backpacks are outlawed, only outlaws will have backpacks. Joseph Gerth, The Courier-Journal, "Backpacks don't kill. People do. So why ban them?," 11 June 2018 To Trump, the summit itself has been the big prize, even though his predecessors avoided meeting North Korea's leaders for fear of giving a photo op to an outlaw dynasty. Anchorage Daily News, "Trump says there's no need for extensive preparation before the summit with Kim Jong Un," 10 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Plumes of black smoke billowed from the fire as the cellophane released its chemical fumes — precisely why burn barrels have been outlawed in other counties. Liz Arnold, Longreads, "Making Peace with the Site of a Suicide," 11 July 2018 It’s been banned in public — but smoking, the theme of the fall-winter couture, has evidently not been outlawed as a source of fashion inspiration. Washington Post, "Standing ovation at Valentino caps Paris couture week," 4 July 2018 The drug has been outlawed in Louisiana since 2010. Maria Clark, NOLA.com, "70 cases of severe bleeding linked to 'fake weed' in Illinois: report," 3 Apr. 2018 Thousands of Islamists and several leading secular activists have been jailed, and unauthorized protests have been outlawed. Hamza Hendawi, Fox News, "In Egypt's election, turnout provides the only suspense," 25 Mar. 2018 Things have improved for the blind since the passage of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990, which outlawed discrimination against the disabled. Pam Kragen, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Blind cycling team to ride across country," 16 June 2018 Those federal laws include Title IX, which outlaws discrimination based on gender in federally funded educational settings. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Amid rampant sexual harassment in science, academies aren’t ejecting abusers," 12 June 2018 The moves come after a U.S. Supreme Court decision last month overturned a decades-old federal law that outlawed the practice in much of the country. Chris Kirkham, WSJ, "As Sports Betting Goes Legit, a Home Team’s Win Can Mean Bookmakers Lose," 7 June 2018 The beginning of school desegregation starts with the U.S. Supreme Court's Brown vs. Board of Education landmark 1954 decision that outlawed racial segregation in public schools. Dawn Mitchell, Indianapolis Star, "50 years ago the Justice Dept. sued IPS to force desegregation," 31 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outlaw.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outlaw

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outlaw

Noun

Middle English outlawe, from Old English ūtlaga, from Old Norse ūtlagi, from ūt out (akin to Old English ūt out) + lag-, lǫg law — more at out, law

Noun

Old English ūtlaga, from Old Norse ūtlagi, from ūt out + lag lǫg law

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Dictionary Entries near outlaw

outlandish

outlast

outlaugh

outlaw

outlay

outleap

outlearn

Statistics for outlaw

Last Updated

13 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outlaw

The first known use of outlaw was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for outlaw

outlaw

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outlaw

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who has broken the law and who is hiding or running away to avoid punishment

outlaw

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outlaw (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (something) illegal

outlaw

noun
out·law | \ˈau̇t-ˌlȯ \

Kids Definition of outlaw

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who has broken the law and is hiding or fleeing to avoid punishment

outlaw

verb
outlawed; outlawing

Kids Definition of outlaw (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make illegal Dueling was outlawed.

outlaw

noun
out·law | \ˈau̇t-ˌlȯ \

Legal Definition of outlaw 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person excluded from the benefit or protection of the law a trespasser is not an outlaw

2 : a lawless person or a fugitive from the law

3 : a person or organization (as a nation) under a ban or restriction or considered to be in defiance of norms or laws considered an outlaw for its support of terrorism

Legal Definition of outlaw (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make illegal

Other Words from outlaw

outlawry \ˈau̇t-ˌlȯr-ē \ noun

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Comments on outlaw

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