predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting; predicts

Definition of predict

transitive verb

: to declare or indicate in advance especially : foretell on the basis of observation, experience, or scientific reason

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from predict

predictor \ pri-​ˈdik-​tər How to pronounce predictor (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for predict

foretell, predict, forecast, prophesy, prognosticate mean to tell beforehand. foretell applies to the telling of the coming of a future event by any procedure or any source of information. seers foretold the calamity predict commonly implies inference from facts or accepted laws of nature. astronomers predicted an eclipse forecast adds the implication of anticipating eventualities and differs from predict in being usually concerned with probabilities rather than certainties. forecast snow prophesy connotes inspired or mystic knowledge of the future especially as the fulfilling of divine threats or promises. prophesying a new messiah prognosticate is used less often than the other words; it may suggest learned or skilled interpretation, but more often it is simply a colorful substitute for predict or prophesy. prognosticating the future

Examples of predict in a Sentence

All the local forecasters are predicting rain for this afternoon. She claims that she can predict future events. It's hard to predict how the election will turn out. Many people predicted that the store would fail, but it has done very well. Sales are predicted to be the same as last year.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web In her latest update to aldermen, Dr. Allison Arwady said it’s tough to predict whether the city will see its healthcare facilities heavily taxed by the combination of COVID-19 and flu cases this winter. John Byrne, chicagotribune.com, "Chicago health commissioner looks ahead to building vaccine trust, eventual distribution," 16 Sep. 2020 Research teams will assess whether variation in biomarkers can predict clinical trajectories and identify participants most likely to benefit from specific treatments. Eliza Fawcett, courant.com, "Institute of Living research team selected to join international research effort studying schizophrenia in young people," 16 Sep. 2020 One is a forecasting model that intends to predict what will happen, given current trends, Del Valle says. Christie Aschwanden, Scientific American, "How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19," 15 Sep. 2020 Legates is a critic of climate modeling used to predict future conditions. Scott Waldman, Science | AAAS, "Climate change denialist given top role at major U.S. science agency," 14 Sep. 2020 An increase in searches for symptoms commonly associated with COVID-19 may help predict emerging hotspots, according to a recent study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Maria Pasquini, PEOPLE.com, "Online Searches for Coronavirus Symptoms Could Help Predict Rise in Cases, Study Finds," 14 Sep. 2020 Duke could still make things interesting in an opening weekend for the ACC that’s hard to predict due to this strange off-season. Erick Smith, USA TODAY, "Five questions that will be answered in Week 2 of the college football season," 12 Sep. 2020 For better and worse, you guys have this ability to predict the cultural climate months earlier. Nick Romano, EW.com, "Liberty unmasked: The Boys EP pulls back the hood of [SPOILER]'s secret identity," 11 Sep. 2020 Four years after President Trump surprised many Americans by outperforming polls in battleground states, a cottage industry of political tech startups has sprung up to predict voter preferences ahead of the 2020 election. Emily Glazer, WSJ, "Election 2020 Polls: Startups Pitch Themselves as Alternatives," 10 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'predict.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of predict

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for predict

Latin praedictus, past participle of praedicere, from prae- pre- + dicere to say — more at diction

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about predict

Time Traveler for predict

Time Traveler

The first known use of predict was in 1590

See more words from the same year

Statistics for predict

Last Updated

19 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Predict.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/predict. Accessed 27 Sep. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for predict

predict

verb
How to pronounce predict (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future

predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting

Kids Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future predict the weather

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on predict

What made you want to look up predict? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Challenging Vocabulary Quiz Returns!

  • stylized drawing of woman pole vaulting across gap to get trophy
  • Which is a synonym of fuliginous?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Bee Cubed

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!