prediction

noun
pre·​dic·​tion | \ pri-ˈdik-shən How to pronounce prediction (audio) \

Definition of prediction

1 : an act of predicting
2 : something that is predicted : forecast

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Examples of prediction in a Sentence

Journalists have begun making predictions about the winner of the coming election. Despite predictions that the store would fail, it has done very well. The figures and statistics are used for the prediction of future economic trends.
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Recent Examples on the Web In terms of a timeline, Gates said he's aligned with Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, on his prediction that there will be a viable vaccine by the end of the year, or early 2021. Melissa Mahtani, CNN, "Bill Gates: US 'not even close' to doing enough to fight pandemic," 26 June 2020 Cocconi says that this 45-mile round trip—up the mountain and back-is a realistic range prediction for an electric vehicle. Barry Winfield, Car and Driver, "Tested: 1997 General Motors EV1 Proves to Be the Start of Something Big," 24 June 2020 Three years later, however, his prediction is proving true. Emma Colton, Washington Examiner, "Media ridiculed Trump in 2017 for predicting social justice movement would target Washington and Jefferson," 22 June 2020 To be sure, this is just a prediction, and a lot of assumptions went into it. John Cassidy, The New Yorker, "As New York Reaches a Coronavirus Landmark, Parts of Red America Are Facing a Potential Disaster," 19 June 2020 Going very far out on a limb here with a prediction: Picnics will be big this summer. Dallas News, "Potato salad celebration: 4 recipes for your next socially-distanced picnic," 17 June 2020 See how well her recent weather prediction turned out. Laura Helmuth, Scientific American, "Know the Enemy," 16 June 2020 These visions of an urban ice age have been buttressed by another recent prediction: that office work will no longer require physically going into an office. Amanda Mull, The Atlantic, "The High Cost of Panic-Moving," 15 June 2020 The prediction from New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo was grim. Charles Ornstein, ProPublica, "How America’s Hospitals Survived the First Wave of the Coronavirus," 15 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prediction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prediction

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for prediction

Time Traveler

The first known use of prediction was in 1561

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Statistics for prediction

Last Updated

29 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Prediction.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prediction. Accessed 4 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for prediction

prediction

noun
How to pronounce prediction (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of prediction

: a statement about what will happen or might happen in the future
: the act of saying what will happen in the future : the act of predicting something

prediction

noun
pre·​dic·​tion | \ pri-ˈdik-shən How to pronounce prediction (audio) \

Kids Definition of prediction

1 : an act of saying what will or might happen in the future prediction of earthquakes
2 : a statement about what will or might happen in the future a weather prediction

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Comments on prediction

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