predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting; predicts

Definition of predict

transitive verb

: to declare or indicate in advance especially : foretell on the basis of observation, experience, or scientific reason

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Other Words from predict

predictor \ pri-​ˈdik-​tər How to pronounce predictor (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for predict

foretell, predict, forecast, prophesy, prognosticate mean to tell beforehand. foretell applies to the telling of the coming of a future event by any procedure or any source of information. seers foretold the calamity predict commonly implies inference from facts or accepted laws of nature. astronomers predicted an eclipse forecast adds the implication of anticipating eventualities and differs from predict in being usually concerned with probabilities rather than certainties. forecast snow prophesy connotes inspired or mystic knowledge of the future especially as the fulfilling of divine threats or promises. prophesying a new messiah prognosticate is used less often than the other words; it may suggest learned or skilled interpretation, but more often it is simply a colorful substitute for predict or prophesy. prognosticating the future

Examples of predict in a Sentence

All the local forecasters are predicting rain for this afternoon. She claims that she can predict future events. It's hard to predict how the election will turn out. Many people predicted that the store would fail, but it has done very well. Sales are predicted to be the same as last year.
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Recent Examples on the Web

That has led several experts to predict that a lot of these colleges will face serious financial challenges in the years ahead, and that many will even close. Adam Harris, The Atlantic, "Are Small Private Colleges Worth the Money?," 2 July 2019 So many women already have signed up to run for the Louisiana Legislature this fall that Democrats and Republicans are predicting a sea change in the state’s lawmaking body by the time the votes are counted. The Advocate, "State Politics," 30 June 2019 The 20-year-old is still young and raw, and thus only gets a 76 predicted rating due to the lack of game time and certainty over his best position. SI.com, "FIFA 20: Every Manchester United Player's Predicted Ultimate Team Rating," 24 June 2019 Heart disease was once on course to fall below cancer as the nation’s leading cause of death, a change public-health statisticians most recently predicted would occur by 2020. Betsy Mckay, WSJ, "Heart Attack at 49—America’s Biggest Killer Makes a Deadly Comeback," 21 June 2019 Feeding the predicted gestures into an existing image-generation algorithm led to semirealistic videos, as seen in the video. Matthew Hutson, Science | AAAS, "Watch artificial intelligence predict Conan O’Brien’s gestures just from the sound of his voice," 21 June 2019 With experts predicting more perilous conditions to come, Cal Fire is hiring more firefighters, deploying more equipment and spending more money on fire engines, helicopters, air tankers and fire-prevention programs than ever before. Kurtis Alexander, San Francisco Chronicle, "Can California avoid a third year of fire catastrophe? Here’s what’s been fixed — and what hasn’t," 20 June 2019 The truth is, even the most seasoned scientists are reluctant to predict exactly when cancer might be cured. STAT, "Biden wants to cure cancer. Now Trump does, too. But cancer, like health care, is complicated," 19 June 2019 From her album releases to her fashion line drops and even to her hair colour, there's simply no predicting Beyoncé's next move. Rachel Lubitz, refinery29.com, "Beyoncé Just Switched Up Her Hair Colour — & Fans Love It," 7 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'predict.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of predict

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for predict

Latin praedictus, past participle of praedicere, from prae- pre- + dicere to say — more at diction

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Statistics for predict

Last Updated

10 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for predict

The first known use of predict was in 1590

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More Definitions for predict

predict

verb

English Language Learners Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future

predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt How to pronounce predict (audio) \
predicted; predicting

Kids Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future predict the weather

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More from Merriam-Webster on predict

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with predict

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for predict

Spanish Central: Translation of predict

Nglish: Translation of predict for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of predict for Arabic Speakers

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