infuriate

verb
in·​fu·​ri·​ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ˌāt How to pronounce infuriate (audio) \
infuriated; infuriating

Definition of infuriate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make furious

infuriate

adjective
in·​fu·​ri·​ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ət How to pronounce infuriate (audio) \

Definition of infuriate (Entry 2 of 2)

: furiously angry

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Other Words from infuriate

Verb

infuriation \ in-​ˌfyu̇r-​ē-​ˈā-​shən How to pronounce infuriate (audio) \ noun

Examples of infuriate in a Sentence

Verb I was infuriated by his arrogance. the quarterback's stupid mistake infuriated the coach Adjective Casanova made a hasty retreat from the woman's bedroom, with the infuriate husband in hot pursuit.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In failing to consult with workplace experts before issuing its guidance, the CDC has managed to infuriate both labor unions and employers. Jordan Barab, Time, 21 May 2021 It was also expected to infuriate Kiev -- the pipeline will allow Russia to bypass Ukraine in shipping gas to the European Union through the Baltic Sea, depriving the Ukrainians of crucial revenue. Caroline Kelly, CNN, 25 May 2021 But selling Kane, even for a high price, would infuriate fans and surely unsettle the squad. Robert Kidd, Forbes, 20 May 2021 Going along with extradition would infuriate Trump’s MAGA supporters — the very people DeSantis needs for his own re-election next year and any future presidential candidacy. Anthony Man, sun-sentinel.com, 13 May 2021 Leaflet operations like these typically infuriate North Korea's leaders. Joshua Berlinger, CNN, 1 May 2021 Ostrover gives witty readings that infuriate Edelshtein. New York Times, 19 Apr. 2021 JetBlue Airways is shaking up its ticket perks and restrictions, with some changes that will thrill travelers and a major one that will infuriate plenty of passengers. Dawn Gilbertson, USA TODAY, 17 Feb. 2021 The example is a reminder of the novelty of Scruton’s thought, and his rationalizations of the seemingly irrational that so infuriate his critics. Barnaby Crowcroft, National Review, 26 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'infuriate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of infuriate

Verb

1667, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1667, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for infuriate

Verb

Medieval Latin infuriatus, past participle of infuriare, from Latin in- + furia fury

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Time Traveler for infuriate

Time Traveler

The first known use of infuriate was in 1667

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Statistics for infuriate

Last Updated

20 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Infuriate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/infuriate. Accessed 23 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for infuriate

infuriate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of infuriate

: to make (someone) very angry : to make (someone) furious

infuriate

verb
in·​fu·​ri·​ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ˌāt How to pronounce infuriate (audio) \
infuriated; infuriating

Kids Definition of infuriate

: to make furious : enrage

More from Merriam-Webster on infuriate

Nglish: Translation of infuriate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of infuriate for Arabic Speakers

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