anger

noun
an·​ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər How to pronounce anger (audio) \

Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of displeasure and usually of antagonism (see antagonism sense 1b) You could hear the anger in his voice. She found it hard to control her anger.

anger

verb
angered; angering\ ˈaŋ-​g(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce angering (audio) \

Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make (someone) angry He was angered by the decision.

intransitive verb

: to become angry a man who angers easily

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Other Words from anger

Noun

angerless \ ˈaŋ-​gər-​ləs How to pronounce angerless (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for anger

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for anger

Noun

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Noun

anger, rage, and fury mean the feelings brought about by great displeasure. anger can be used of either a strong or a mild feeling. I was able to hide my anger. rage is used of strong violent feeling that is difficult to control. He was screaming with rage. fury is used of overwhelming rage that may cause a person to become violent. In their fury the people smashed windows.

Examples of anger in a Sentence

Noun He couldn't hide his anger with us. You could hear the anger in his voice. The group expressed its anger over the company's arrogance. He said that he had no anger towards the person who shot him. He never raised his voice in anger. She was shaking in anger. Verb They were shocked and angered by the company's arrogance. He was angered to learn that he had been fired. It angered me that she would say something like that. He's a gentle man who's not easily angered.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The week started with anger dripping from the unlikeliest of sources: Yu Darvish and game’s mild-mannered superstar, Mike Trout. Evan Grant, Dallas News, "Rob Manfred’s latest defense of Astros’ punishments only adds to absurd mess MLB has created," 19 Feb. 2020 Both were ousted from office last week amid rising anger over the response. Andrew Joseph, STAT, "The global responders: Who is leading the charge against the coronavirus outbreak," 17 Feb. 2020 The probability that my Swedish design furniture will arrive today is decreasing as the hours go by, inversely correlated with my anger levels. Flavie Halais, Wired, "Vexed by Missed Deliveries? Data-Savvy Tech Can Help," 15 Feb. 2020 Gun-control bills aren't expected to get far at the Arizona Legislature this session, but people across the state are reacting with anger and taking action. Chelsea Curtis, azcentral, "Gun-control bills at Arizona Legislature create backlash; turnout could grow at Second Amendment rally," 14 Feb. 2020 Who wants to buy into a country that is, by most indications, devastated by sanctions, cut off from the rest of the world economy and seething with public anger over rising prices and declining living standards? Mr. Wojtal does. Peter S. Goodman, New York Times, "Iran’s Economy Is Bleak. Its Stock Market Is Soaring.," 13 Feb. 2020 Other critics echoed those sentiments and social media lit up with anger and mocking imitations. Mitch Albom, Detroit Free Press, "Mitch Albom: 'American Dirt' criticism steps on a dangerous live wire," 26 Jan. 2020 The Sussexes’ decision to call out royal reporters specifically has been met with anger and hurt. K.j. Yossman, Marie Claire, "Royal Correspondents React to Meghan and Harry’s Mic-Drop Announcement," 12 Jan. 2020 Some of the parents reacted with anger and disgust toward the Hornet squadron. Robert Faturechi, ProPublica, "Faulty Equipment, Lapsed Training, Repeated Warnings: How a Preventable Disaster Killed Six Marines," 2 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Neoliberalism is a frequent target of López Obrador's ire, but his decision to refer to a common political talking point in relation to the topic of femicide angered many observers. Natalie Gallón, CNN, "Murder of 7-year-old girl in Mexico fuels anger and protests over brutal killings," 19 Feb. 2020 Plenty of questions lingered – MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred even described the apologies as unsuccessful – and left opposing players angered. Evan Hilbert, USA TODAY, "Former NBA superstar Dwyane Wade's greatest feat could literally save lives," 18 Feb. 2020 Many Iraqis have also been angered at how U.S. and Iranian hostilities have played out on their soil, including last month’s U.S. drone strike that killed top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad. Washington Post, "Aging Shiite cleric a powerhouse in Iraq. What comes after?," 18 Feb. 2020 Those travel policies violated the recommendations of the WHO and angered China as U.S. health officials were negotiating allowing U.S. experts into China to assist with the response and investigation. Andrew Joseph, STAT, "The global responders: Who is leading the charge against the coronavirus outbreak," 17 Feb. 2020 As anyone would expect based on the articles published over the past couple of days, many are deeply troubled and angered. The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, "West Linn police chief releases statement in growing scandal over wrongful arrest of Portland man," 13 Feb. 2020 The charges were dropped in March 2019 with little explanation, angering police officials and Mayor Rahm Emanuel. BostonGlobe.com, "Actor Jussie Smollett faces new charges," 11 Feb. 2020 The charges were dropped in March 2019 with little explanation, angering police officials and then-Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Time, "Actor Jussie Smollett Faces Six New Charges of Lying to Chicago Police," 11 Feb. 2020 He, like other students, cited worries that angering Chinese or their country's authorities could lead to retaliation, like loss of scholarships. CBS News, "China coronavirus cases top 10,000 as U.S. declares public health emergency," 31 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'anger.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of anger

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for anger

Noun

Middle English anger, angre "distress, affliction, hostile attitude, strong displeasure," borrowed from Old Norse angr "grief, vexation," going back to Germanic *angaza-, from an Indo-European s-stem *h2emǵh-es-/*h2emǵh-os- (whence Latin angor "suffocation, anguish," Sanskrit áṁhaḥ "anxiety, trouble," Avestan ązah-), derivatives of a verbal base *h2emǵh- "constrict, narrow," whence Latin angō, angere "to choke, cause pain to, afflict, vex," Greek ánchō, ánchein "to squeeze, strangle," Hittite ḫamanki "(s/he) ties, binds"; also from the base *h2emǵh- an adjective derivative *h2emǵh-u- "narrow," whence Germanic *angu- (> *angwu-, angwja-, whence Old English enge "narrow," ange "distressing," Old Saxon & Old High German engi "narrow," Old High German ango "anxious," Old Norse ǫngr, øngr, Gothic aggwus), Old Irish cumung "narrow," Welsh cyfyng, Old Church Slavic ǫzŭkŭ, Polish wązki, Armenian anjuk (Slavic & Armenian with a velar suffix), Sanskrit aṁhúḥ

Note: For other words formed from this Indo-European base see etymologies of angst, anguish entry 1, anxious, hangnail, quinsy.

Verb

Middle English angren "to be anxious, grieve, be vexed, irritate, afflict," probably in part derivative of anger, angre anger entry 1, in part borrowed from Old Norse angra "to grieve, vex," derivative of angr "grief, vexation"

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Learn More about anger

Time Traveler for anger

Time Traveler

The first known use of anger was in the 13th century

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Statistics for anger

Last Updated

23 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Anger.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/anger. Accessed 26 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for anger

anger

noun
How to pronounce anger (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of being upset or annoyed because of something wrong or bad : the feeling that makes someone want to hurt other people, to shout, etc. : the feeling of being angry

anger

verb

English Language Learners Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) angry

anger

verb
an·​ger | \ ˈaŋ-gər How to pronounce anger (audio) \
angered; angering

Kids Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make strongly displeased : make angry

anger

noun

Kids Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of displeasure or annoyance and often of active opposition to an insult, injury, or injustice

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More from Merriam-Webster on anger

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for anger

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with anger

Spanish Central: Translation of anger

Nglish: Translation of anger for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of anger for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about anger

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