indignant

adjective
in·​dig·​nant | \ in-ˈdig-nənt How to pronounce indignant (audio) \

Definition of indignant

: feeling or showing anger because of something unjust or unworthy : filled with or marked by indignation became indignant at the accusation

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Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb

Examples of indignant in a Sentence

Melville was so struck by the drama of the Essex (deliberately battered by an indignant and maddened whale, which at last brained itself by sinking the ship) that he used it as the end of Moby-Dick. — Paul Theroux, New York Times Book Review, 11 June 2000 What you really need is a story that will not only excuse tardiness but encourage your boss to give you the entire day off.  … Should anyone give you the third degree on your return to work, don't hesitate to become indignant and stomp out of the room. — Jeff Foxworthy, No Shirt. No Shoes. No Problem!, 1996 When the Roman soldiers were asked to take part in the Claudian invasion of 43, they waxed indignant. This was asking them to carry on a campaign "outside the limits of the known world." — Antonia Fraser, The Warrior Queens, 1988 She wrote an indignant letter to the editor. He was very indignant about the changes. an indignant tone of voice
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Recent Examples on the Web As memories of Christmastime gang violence faded, many people turned indignant about the commercialization of the holiday. Jason Zweig, WSJ, "How Capitalism Saved Christmas," 25 Dec. 2020 Still, Dwyer is indignant toward the widespread blame laid on college students for outbreaks at their schools. Rebecca Renner, Science, "The colleges with virtually no coronavirus cases," 23 Nov. 2020 His actions prompted indignant posts on Facebook from the left-leaning page Occupy Democrats. Camille Caldera, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Claim about Sen. Lindsey Graham's calls to state officials is misleading," 20 Nov. 2020 If so, indignant conservatives are late to the game. Osita Nwanevu, The New Republic, "The Constitution Is the Crisis," 19 Oct. 2020 HODs are indignant that option is even on the table. David Moore, Dallas News, "Ongoing debate surrounding Cowboys QB Dak Prescott is about more than his performance on the field," 29 Sep. 2020 But indignant French lawmakers note that Brussels has more cases than Strasbourg. Washington Post, "The European Parliament doesn’t want to spread the coronavirus by traveling to France. The French are furious.," 15 Sep. 2020 In an eloquent and indignant open letter, Kerandi confronted university administrators who claim to have values of diversity, equity, and inclusion and yet hire police, who have a record of murdering Black men and women, to patrol campus. Astra Taylor, The New Republic, "The End of the University," 8 Sep. 2020 Dear Readers: Labor Day, for Miss Manners, comes with the laborious task of facing indignant messages from those who object to this holiday’s also marking the end of the white shoe season. Judith Martin, Washington Post, "Miss Manners: White shoes, hidden watches and odd-numbered pearls," 7 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'indignant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of indignant

1590, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for indignant

Latin indignant-, indignans, present participle of indignari to be indignant, from indignus unworthy, from in- + dignus worthy — more at decent

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Time Traveler for indignant

Time Traveler

The first known use of indignant was in 1590

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Statistics for indignant

Last Updated

14 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Indignant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/indignant. Accessed 28 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for indignant

indignant

adjective
How to pronounce indignant (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of indignant

: feeling or showing anger because of something that is unfair or wrong : very angry

indignant

adjective
in·​dig·​nant | \ in-ˈdig-nənt How to pronounce indignant (audio) \

Kids Definition of indignant

: filled with or expressing anger caused by something unjust or unworthy

Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb “I didn't insult you!” protested Jack, indignantly. — L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

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Comments on indignant

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