indignant

adjective
in·dig·nant | \in-ˈdig-nənt \

Definition of indignant 

: feeling or showing anger because of something unjust or unworthy : filled with or marked by indignation became indignant at the accusation

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Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb

Examples of indignant in a Sentence

Melville was so struck by the drama of the Essex (deliberately battered by an indignant and maddened whale, which at last brained itself by sinking the ship) that he used it as the end of Moby-Dick. — Paul Theroux, New York Times Book Review, 11 June 2000 What you really need is a story that will not only excuse tardiness but encourage your boss to give you the entire day off.  … Should anyone give you the third degree on your return to work, don't hesitate to become indignant and stomp out of the room. — Jeff Foxworthy, No Shirt. No Shoes. No Problem!, 1996 When the Roman soldiers were asked to take part in the Claudian invasion of 43, they waxed indignant. This was asking them to carry on a campaign "outside the limits of the known world." — Antonia Fraser, The Warrior Queens, 1988 She wrote an indignant letter to the editor. He was very indignant about the changes. an indignant tone of voice
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Recent Examples on the Web

Both sides have ratcheted up sanctions and countersanctions as confrontations over alleged Russian interference in the West, and Russia’s indignant denials, have heated up. Thomas Grove, WSJ, "After Expulsions, Options Dwindle in Russia and West’s ‘Diplomatic War’," 30 Mar. 2018 Two would later file the lawsuit against both Reyes and the sheriff’s office, indignant that Reyes received only probation. Sarah Blaskey, miamiherald, "He got probation for rape. They got a million dollars for cruel and unusual punishment | Miami Herald," 2 Mar. 2018 Mr Ellison would unleash his indignant and ingenious fury on anyone who offended him, relishing every opportunity to rage at reactionaries and Republicans. The Economist, "Harlan Ellison died on June 27th," 5 July 2018 Unfortunately, this was entirely too offensive for the indignant white men, who informed the women that the police had been called. Monique Judge, The Root, "Stop Calling the Police on Black People Just Because You’re Annoyed; You’re Gonna Get Someone Killed," 23 Apr. 2018 White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, aka Suckabee, is still drinking the White House Kool-Aid—the special blend of indignant righteous and aloof ramblings that allows for unfathomable levels of heartlessness. Stephen A. Crockett Jr., The Root, "Sarah Huckabee Sanders Continues Her White-Tears Tour Despite Being Satan's Mouthpiece," 3 July 2018 Querrey grew indignant upon hearing that the Usada database had credited him with no completed out-of-competition tests this year. Karen Crouse, New York Times, "For Tennis Players, Numbers in Antidoping Program Don’t Add Up," 3 July 2018 Unsure of whether the maître d' is bored or indignant, the second individual delicately gets the hosts attention through a gentle greeting. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "How to Tap Into Your Own Psychic Abilities," 2 July 2018 While attendants onboard waited for paramedics to arrive, one woman, who has not yet been identified, grew increasingly indignant. Monica Rodriguez, Fortune, "Woman's Meltdown Leaves Spirit Flight Passengers Shaken," 26 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'indignant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of indignant

1590, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for indignant

Latin indignant-, indignans, present participle of indignari to be indignant, from indignus unworthy, from in- + dignus worthy — more at decent

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Statistics for indignant

Last Updated

23 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for indignant

The first known use of indignant was in 1590

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More Definitions for indignant

indignant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of indignant

: feeling or showing anger because of something that is unfair or wrong : very angry

indignant

adjective
in·dig·nant | \in-ˈdig-nənt \

Kids Definition of indignant

: filled with or expressing anger caused by something unjust or unworthy

Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb “I didn't insult you!” protested Jack, indignantly. — L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

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Comments on indignant

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exaggeratedly or childishly emotional

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