indignant

adjective
in·​dig·​nant | \ in-ˈdig-nənt \

Definition of indignant 

: feeling or showing anger because of something unjust or unworthy : filled with or marked by indignation became indignant at the accusation

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Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb

Examples of indignant in a Sentence

Melville was so struck by the drama of the Essex (deliberately battered by an indignant and maddened whale, which at last brained itself by sinking the ship) that he used it as the end of Moby-Dick. — Paul Theroux, New York Times Book Review, 11 June 2000 What you really need is a story that will not only excuse tardiness but encourage your boss to give you the entire day off.  … Should anyone give you the third degree on your return to work, don't hesitate to become indignant and stomp out of the room. — Jeff Foxworthy, No Shirt. No Shoes. No Problem!, 1996 When the Roman soldiers were asked to take part in the Claudian invasion of 43, they waxed indignant. This was asking them to carry on a campaign "outside the limits of the known world." — Antonia Fraser, The Warrior Queens, 1988 She wrote an indignant letter to the editor. He was very indignant about the changes. an indignant tone of voice
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Recent Examples on the Web

On Friday, Meyer posted an indignant response on Twitter to recent media coverage. Laura Mcgann, Vox, "Urban Meyer and Ohio State care more about a game than victims of domestic violence," 31 Aug. 2018 One promising effort to shore up shaky banks with public money fizzled when an indignant Congress demanded recipients’ names be published, a stigma that drove banks away. Greg Ip, WSJ, "Why Bush’s Quiet Role in Financial Crisis Deserves Attention Now," 12 Sep. 2018 Several indignant audience reactions made for classic GIF fodder. Devon Maloney, The Verge, "Hollywood had a breakdown trying to justify itself at the 2018 Emmys," 18 Sep. 2018 Others on the left were indignant about the ways protest and resistance were being commodified and used to build a behemoth company’s brand. Sarah Banet-weiser, Vox, "Nike’s Kaepernick ad continues — and tweaks — the tradition of brands commodifying politics.," 7 Sep. 2018 Both sides have ratcheted up sanctions and countersanctions as confrontations over alleged Russian interference in the West, and Russia’s indignant denials, have heated up. Thomas Grove, WSJ, "After Expulsions, Options Dwindle in Russia and West’s ‘Diplomatic War’," 30 Mar. 2018 Two would later file the lawsuit against both Reyes and the sheriff’s office, indignant that Reyes received only probation. Sarah Blaskey, miamiherald, "He got probation for rape. They got a million dollars for cruel and unusual punishment | Miami Herald," 2 Mar. 2018 Mr Ellison would unleash his indignant and ingenious fury on anyone who offended him, relishing every opportunity to rage at reactionaries and Republicans. The Economist, "Harlan Ellison died on June 27th," 5 July 2018 Unfortunately, this was entirely too offensive for the indignant white men, who informed the women that the police had been called. Monique Judge, The Root, "Stop Calling the Police on Black People Just Because You’re Annoyed; You’re Gonna Get Someone Killed," 23 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'indignant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of indignant

1590, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for indignant

Latin indignant-, indignans, present participle of indignari to be indignant, from indignus unworthy, from in- + dignus worthy — more at decent

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Statistics for indignant

Last Updated

16 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for indignant

The first known use of indignant was in 1590

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More Definitions for indignant

indignant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of indignant

: feeling or showing anger because of something that is unfair or wrong : very angry

indignant

adjective
in·​dig·​nant | \ in-ˈdig-nənt \

Kids Definition of indignant

: filled with or expressing anger caused by something unjust or unworthy

Other Words from indignant

indignantly adverb “I didn't insult you!” protested Jack, indignantly. — L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz

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Comments on indignant

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