outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

affront, barb, brickbat, cut, dart, dig, dis (also diss) [slang], epithet, gird, indignity, insult, name, offense (or offence), personality, poke, put-down, sarcasm, slap, slight, slur

Synonyms: Verb

affront, dis (also diss) [slang], disrespect, insult, offend, slap, slight, wound

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

As public outrage about the family-separation crisis has grown, many people have wondered who, if anyone, would pay for the trauma inflicted. Sarah Stillman, The New Yorker, "How Families Separated at the Border Could Make the Government Pay," 15 June 2019 The bipartisan measure, co-sponsored by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, was introduced this week after a spike in race horse deaths at multiple tracks elicited outrage from animal rights groups. Dennis Wagner, azcentral, "Sen. Martha McSally bill aimed at race horse deaths prompts debate over race horse 'doping'," 15 June 2019 That being said, the repeal has caused an outrage amongst the parents of unvaccinated children, hundreds of whom, according to the report, gathered at the state Capitol to protest against the vote. Breanna Edwards, Essence, "New York Repeals Religious Exception To Vaccination Requirements For Schoolchildren," 14 June 2019 These latest outrages only magnify the point that has been obvious for years now: the president is unfit for office. Michael A. Cohen, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump’s latest betrayal strengthens the case for impeachment," 14 June 2019 The disturbing video drew shock and outrage across New York City. Erin Donaghue, CBS News, "Five guilty of murder in mistaken identity gang slaying of Bronx teen," 14 June 2019 More so than any movement in the twenty-first century, the gilets jaunes embody the problems of outrage politics. Stephen Paduano, The New Republic, "The Limits of Outrage Politics," 13 June 2019 That has led to outrage both inside and outside of Amazon. Jason Del Rey, Vox, "Amazon’s facial recognition boss wants the feds to hurry up with regulation," 11 June 2019 The shock of the murder brought widespread mourning and outrage to Native communities and made national headlines. Eric Ogden, Marie Claire, "The Invisible Victims," 10 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The case captivated and outraged New York City after the teen was caught on tape being dragged from a bodega and viciously stabbed to death. Laura Barcella, PEOPLE.com, "Five Found Guilty of Dragging 15-Year-Old Boy From Bronx Store, Stabbing Him to Death With Machete," 14 June 2019 Prosecutors later dropped the charges against him, a decision that outraged the city's then mayor and the police chief. Faith Karimi, CNN, "'Empire' creator says he had to cut off communication with Jussie Smollett after scandal," 12 June 2019 Just last year, The Daily Caller reported that teachers in Savannah were outraged when Savannah-Chatham County administrators presented a new dress code banning jeans every single day. Samantha Brodsky, Good Housekeeping, "This School "Banned" Teachers From Wearing Capris," 4 Aug. 2017 Despite their intentions, fans were outraged over Kelly and John's reactions. Blair Donovan, Country Living, "The Voice's Kelly Clarkson and John Legend Receive Backlash for Being 'Too Political'," 14 May 2019 The story outraged Musk, according to Bloomberg who turned to Gouthro, an ex-Marine who had previously worked security at Facebook. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "New Report Claims Tesla Engaged in Lies, Threats to Stop Leaks," 13 Mar. 2019 That agreement essentially forces Britain to retain close economic ties to the bloc for years to come—an outcome that has outraged euroskeptics. Max Colchester, WSJ, "Campaign to Oust U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Fizzles—for Now," 20 Nov. 2018 The slayings devastated the wider Chinese community and outraged many who felt the university was not doing enough to protect the safety of students navigating a new country. Melissa Etehad, latimes.com, "USC's aggressive recruiting of Chinese students faces challenge amid gynecologist scandal," 18 May 2018 Nowarah’s family was outraged that their son’s killer was convicted of negligence, not murder. Washington Post, BostonGlobe.com, "After a killing, an Israeli soldier and an Arab family confront justice," 16 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

18 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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