outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue. Verb His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun My immediate reaction was outrage at her being so sensitive. Masha Gessen, The New Yorker, "How a Journalist in Kyiv Responded to the Downing of a Ukrainian Passenger Plane," 11 Jan. 2020 Other recent deaths of children have elicited similar cries of outrage and vows of action. Dana Branham, Dallas News, "Shooting that killed 1-year-old, wounded man in South Dallas was targeted and deliberate, police chief says," 5 Jan. 2020 The reaction from the HBO program’s more hard-core fans was predictable outrage. Helen Lewis, The Atlantic, "Why The Witcher Is Better Than Game of Thrones," 1 Jan. 2020 But outrage over the ban, on Twitter with #BoycottHallmarkChannel, and by celebrities like Ellen DeGeneres and William Shatner, has resulted in the company’s announcement that they will be reinstated. Fortune, "UNC Faces Backlash on the Decision to Preserve its Confederate Statue," 16 Dec. 2019 The event at the museum underscored how Rice’s death has become a national symbol of outrage over excessive force used by police against blacks. Steven Litt, cleveland, "Tamir Rice legacy shows how artists can sensitively engage with racially charged history," 24 Nov. 2019 This is an era of outrage and division, but there are strong reasons for optimism. Michele Norris, National Geographic, "Why the future should be female," 15 Oct. 2019 Concern and outrage over the crisis of the maternal deaths of black women has reached such a fever pitch that the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates have added the topic to their platforms. Brianna Holt, Quartz, "Giving birth should not be a question of life or death for black women," 4 Oct. 2019 Over the last month in Capetown, protests erupted through the streets in outrage over GBV in South Africa. Omid Scobie, Harper's BAZAAR, "Duchess Meghan Hosts Private Breakfast with South African Activists," 28 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In fact, in 1749, Baron Hårleman, the high commissioner of agriculture in Sweden, was outraged when the already famous biologist Carl Linnaeus wrote about traditional Swedish practices of burning as a farming practice. Popular Science, "The fire ‘time bomb’ is finally detonating on the world," 7 Jan. 2020 Viewers were outraged when the series got the nix, and their passionate outcries eventually led to the renewal on its new network. Megan Stein, Country Living, "'Last Man Standing' Fans Caught an Awkward Mistake That Was Circulating About the Show," 5 Jan. 2020 Others were outraged that Metropolitan would step up while most valley farmers have refused to contribute. Dale Kasler And Ryan Sabalow, sacbee, "Southern California water agency backs 2 Delta tunnels in breakthrough vote," 11 Apr. 2018 While priests sometimes consider defrockings to be equivalent to a death sentence, such seemingly minor sanctions for such heinous crimes have long outraged victims, whose lives are forever scarred by their abuse. Nicole Winfield, Anchorage Daily News, "Vatican office struggles to keep up with rise in clergy abuse cases," 21 Dec. 2019 While priests sometimes consider defrockings to be equivalent to a death sentence, such seemingly minor sanctions for such heinous crimes have long outraged victims, whose lives are forever scarred by their abuse. Washington Post, "Vatican tribunal now overwhelmed by clergy abuse cases," 20 Dec. 2019 While priests sometimes consider defrockings to be equivalent to a death sentence, such seemingly minor sanctions for such heinous crimes have long outraged victims, whose lives are forever scarred by their abuse. Nicole Winfield, BostonGlobe.com, "Vatican tribunal now overwhelmed by clergy abuse cases," 20 Dec. 2019 The fact that its price includes a political dialogue with Catalan separatists has right-wing newspapers outraged. The Economist, "Why Pedro Sánchez needs an agreement with Catalan separatists," 12 Dec. 2019 This depiction of what Murugan claimed was a traditional ritual outraged a class of his readers. Amitava Kumar, The New Yorker, "How Perumal Murugan Was Resurrected Through Writing," 12 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Time Traveler for outrage

Time Traveler

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

15 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Outrage.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/outraged. Accessed 19 January 2020.

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun
How to pronounce outrage (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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