infuriate

verb
in·fu·ri·ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ˌāt \
infuriated; infuriating

Definition of infuriate 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make furious

infuriate

adjective
in·fu·ri·ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ət \

Definition of infuriate (Entry 2 of 2)

: furiously angry

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Other words from infuriate

Verb

infuriatingly \in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ˌā-tiŋ-lē \ adverb
infuriation \in-ˌfyu̇r-ē-ˈā-shən \ noun

Examples of infuriate in a Sentence

Verb

I was infuriated by his arrogance. the quarterback's stupid mistake infuriated the coach

Adjective

Casanova made a hasty retreat from the woman's bedroom, with the infuriate husband in hot pursuit.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The last thing the large group of Democratic senators running in pro-Trump states need right now is a vote that could either infuriate the GOP’s right-to-life base or discourage anti-Trump Democratic voters. Ed Kilgore, Daily Intelligencer, "How Will the SCOTUS Confirmation Fight Affect the Midterms?," 28 June 2018 That’s like one of the things that is infuriating about the whole thing. Kailyn Brown, latimes.com, "Porochista Khakpour's long struggle with being 'Sick'," 21 June 2018 Ordinarily, this is the sort of thing that would infuriate me greatly, since companies going out of their way to spend thousands of dollars on custom fonts for no good reason is just irritating. Chaim Gartenberg, The Verge, "Even Arby’s has its own custom font to make fun of bespoke typefaces," 30 May 2018 Poland for years was one of the strongest advocates in the European Union and NATO for bringing Ukraine into the Western fold, a stance that infuriated Moscow. Fox News, "Ex-presidents see threat in rising Polish-Ukrainian tensions," 28 May 2018 The United States is scheduled to open its embassy in Jerusalem on May 14, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s foundation, in a move that has infuriated the Palestinians. Isabel Kershner, New York Times, "Palestinian Leader Incites Uproar With Speech Condemned as Anti-Semitic," 2 May 2018 The bill would prevent local governments from rejecting proposals for tall, dense buildings near transit hubs and lines, a notion that has infuriated owners of single-family homes and neighborhood activists on the west side of town. Rachel Swan, San Francisco Chronicle, "Kim runs against Wiener housing bill in her race for mayor," 6 Apr. 2018 Trump imposed the trade barriers in the name of national security, infuriating foreign leaders and prompting bipartisan outrage in Congress. Michael Collins, USA TODAY, "Senators blast Trump's 'reckless' tariffs, warn of impact on farmers, businesses," 12 July 2018 Any of the players in June’s life would be justifiably infuriated with her, and likely to punish her in some way. Rena Gross, Billboard, "'The Handmaid's Tale' Season 2 Finale: Here's What Happened," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'infuriate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of infuriate

Verb

1667, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1667, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for infuriate

Verb

Medieval Latin infuriatus, past participle of infuriare, from Latin in- + furia fury

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Statistics for infuriate

Last Updated

20 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for infuriate

The first known use of infuriate was in 1667

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More Definitions for infuriate

infuriate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of infuriate

: to make (someone) very angry : to make (someone) furious

infuriate

verb
in·fu·ri·ate | \ in-ˈfyu̇r-ē-ˌāt \
infuriated; infuriating

Kids Definition of infuriate

: to make furious : enrage

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Comments on infuriate

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