fetch

1 of 3

verb

fetched; fetching; fetches

transitive verb

1
a
: to go or come after and bring or take back
fetch a doctor
b
: derive, deduce
fetch analogies from nature
2
a
: to cause to come
one shot fetched down
b
: to bring in (a price or similar return) : realize
The hogs fetched a good price at the market.
c
: interest, attract
… he doesn't fetch the girls like William …D. H. Lawrence
3
a
: to give (a blow) by striking : deal
fetch him a clip on the chin
b
chiefly dialectal : bring about, accomplish
c(1)
: to take in : draw
sat fetching her breath in dry sobsNgaio Marsh
(2)
: to bring forth : heave
fetch a sigh
4
a
: to reach by sailing especially against the wind or tide
fetch the harbor before the storm breaks
b
: to arrive at : reach
fetched home after a long ride

intransitive verb

1
: to get and bring something
specifically : to retrieve killed game
2
: to take a roundabout way : circle
3
a
: to hold a course on a body of water
fetch to windward
b
: veer
fetcher noun

fetch

2 of 3

noun (1)

1
2
: an act or instance of fetching
3
a
: the distance along open water or land over which the wind blows
b
: the distance traversed by waves without obstruction

fetch

3 of 3

noun (2)

Examples of fetch in a Sentence

Verb If you throw the ball the dog will fetch it. Hunting dogs are trained to fetch. This table should fetch quite a bit at auction. The house fetched more than we expected.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Patek Philippe pocket watch A modern pocket watch from Swiss watchmaker Patek Philippe can already fetch quite a pretty penny. Madeline Boardman, EW.com, 22 Feb. 2024 But a similar estate on nearby Meadow Lane recently fetched $112 million. Jacob Bernstein, New York Times, 21 Feb. 2024 The setting is a fetching backdrop to a surprisingly long a la carte menu whose small-plate highlights include juicy pork belly and kabocha squash gyoza and tuna tartare — red with gochujang and fruity with apple — scooped up with nubby tempura seaweed chips. Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, 20 Feb. 2024 Observers previously estimated that a deal could possibly fetch 1 billion-1.5 billion pounds ($1.25 billion-$1.87 billion). Georg Szalai, The Hollywood Reporter, 16 Feb. 2024 There are two large decks, one outside the kitchen for easy-breezy barbecues and the other positioned to take in a fetching view of one of the many scenic bends in the bayou. Mark David, Robb Report, 15 Feb. 2024 George and Amal Clooney were recently spotted out and about with a fetching new friend! Brenton Blanchet, Peoplemag, 11 Feb. 2024 Given the packages obtained in exchange for centers Elias Lindholm and Sean Monahan in pre-deadline deals, Henrique could fetch an irresistible return. Andrew Knoll, Orange County Register, 7 Feb. 2024 Memphis’ reserve big man Xavier Tillman, a free agent at the end of the year, fetched the Grizzlies a pair of second-round picks from Boston. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, 8 Feb. 2024
Noun
Dogs aren’t the only pets that like to play fetch—some cats do too, according to new research. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 18 Dec. 2023 Reneé Rapp and Megan Thee Stallion teamed up on a new song that is so fetch. Sadie Bell, Peoplemag, 15 Dec. 2023 For example, Oro has made a Dog Companion robot with two-way audio and a video screen so pet owners can remotely interact with their pets and even play fetch. Christopher Hutton, Washington Examiner, 13 Jan. 2024 Ariel has been playing fetch like a champ since kittenhood. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, 14 Dec. 2023 The longer the fetch, the more time there is to suck up warm water along the way. Sophie Carson, Journal Sentinel, 9 Jan. 2024 To learn more about cats’ fetching habits, scientists created an online survey, then sent it to people who have or had cats with a history of playing fetch. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 18 Dec. 2023 Imagine spoiling your pup with a plush bed that promises sweet dreams of endless fetch games. Kristi Arnold, Rolling Stone, 5 Dec. 2023 Advertisement Profile: Alex likes hikes, water and playing fetch. Linda McIntosh, San Diego Union-Tribune, 14 Sep. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'fetch.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb and Noun (1)

Middle English fecchen, from Old English fetian, feccan; perhaps akin to Old English fōt foot — more at foot

Noun (2)

origin unknown

First Known Use

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun (1)

circa 1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

circa 1787, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of fetch was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near fetch

Cite this Entry

“Fetch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fetch. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

fetch

verb
ˈfech
1
: to go after and bring back
2
: to cause to come : bring forth
3
: to bring as a price : sell for
fetcher noun

More from Merriam-Webster on fetch

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