edge

noun
\ ˈej How to pronounce edge (audio) \

Definition of edge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the cutting side of a blade a razor's edge
b : the sharpness of a blade a knife with no edge
c(1) : force, effectiveness blunted the edge of the legislation
(2) : vigor or energy especially of body maintains his hard edge
d(1) : incisive or penetrating quality writing with a satirical edge
(2) : a noticeably harsh or sharp quality her voice had an edge to it
(3) : a secondary but distinct quality rock music with a bluesy edge
e : keenness or intensity of desire or enjoyment lost my competitive edge
2a : the line where an object or area begins or ends : border on the edge of a plain
b : the narrow part adjacent to a border the edge of the deck
c(1) : a point near the beginning or the end especially : brink, verge on the edge of disaster
(2) : the threshold of danger or ruin living on the edge
d : a favorable margin : advantage has an edge on the competition
3 : a line or line segment that is the intersection of two plane faces (as of a pyramid) or of two planes
on edge

edge

verb
edged; edging

Definition of edge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to give an edge to
b : to be on an edge of trees edging the lake
2 : to move or force gradually edged him off the road
3 : to incline (a ski) sideways so that one edge cuts into the snow
4 : to defeat by a small margin often used with outedged out her opponent

intransitive verb

: to advance by short moves

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Other Words from edge

Noun

edgeless adjective

Examples of edge in a Sentence

Noun They peered over the edge of the roof. The fabric was frayed at the edge. He made us all nervous by standing so close to the edge of the cliff. She sat on the edge of the counter, swinging her legs. the edge of an ax His voice had a sarcastic edge. These amendments will blunt the edge of the legislation. Verb Edge the sleeve with lace. She edged away from him. Gasoline prices have been edging upward. I edged my chair closer to the table.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a battle for market share, Qatar would have an edge on its rivals -- its plant at Ras Laffan produces the world’s third-cheapest LNG, according to consultant Rystad Energy. Anna Shiryaevskaya, Bloomberg.com, "Qatar and Its Lose-Lose Problem in Global Gas Fight," 12 May 2020 His vocals are pleasantly imperfect—still thick and round, but a little bit frayed at the edges, and not in an especially deliberate way. Amanda Petrusich, The New Yorker, "Glenn Danzig Sings Elvis," 12 May 2020 There are the seal pups sunning on the island’s rocky edge, the hummingbirds flitting to and fro, the flowers and the pelicans and the butterflies and the nest of sparrows and the incessant seagulls and their incessant poop. Sarah Feldberg, SFChronicle.com, "‘Nowhere I’d rather be’: Innkeeper couple wait out pandemic on East Brother island," 11 May 2020 ZIP codes on the county’s far edges, such as those containing Brecksville, Strongsville and Bay Village, continue to have the fewest cases. Courtney Astolfi, cleveland, "More Cleveland neighborhoods among Cuyahoga County areas with highest range of coronavirus cases: May 8 ZIP code map," 8 May 2020 The display is curved along both edges, like a Samsung or OnePlus phone. Ron Amadeo, Ars Technica, "LG takes the wraps off its “Velvet” smartphone, priced in Korea at $738," 7 May 2020 Bake until the Dutch baby is puffed, lightly browned across the top, and darker brown on the sides and edges, 15-20 minutes. Paul Stephen, ExpressNews.com, "Recipe: Dutch Baby Pancake with Strawberries," 6 May 2020 Benito Juárez and the Liberal Dream Mexican vulnerability naturally attracted opportunistic foreign governments, but geography gave the United States the edge, reflected in the 1846–47 Mexican War, which stripped away a third of Mexico’s territory. Dan Mclaughlin, National Review, "The Real History of Cinco de Mayo," 5 May 2020 To accommodate the second screen, the keyboard is pushed all the way to the bottom edge of the laptop, with the trackpad squished in where a numpad would be. Jess Grey, Wired, "Asus’ New Gaming Laptop Has Two Screens. We’re Not Sure Why," 5 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Green Bay finished 11-5, edged the Lions for the NFC Central crown and earned a date with the Atlanta Falcons at Lambeau Field in the playoffs one week later. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The Next Ten: Yancey Thigpen's drop gives the Packers a rare divisional title," 28 May 2020 In the short term, Miller expects to see rental activity increase in New York’s suburbs, where inquiries were already edging up before the pandemic. Sophie Alexander, Bloomberg.com, "Young Join the Rich Fleeing America’s Big Cities for Suburbs," 28 May 2020 Some countries might even want to join the ETS, edging towards the global carbon market which economists have long dreamed of. The Economist, "Fighting climate change The world urgently needs to expand its use of carbon prices," 23 May 2020 Wonder plants like these can be found growing all over cities and towns, pushing out of the cracks in concrete, climbing a park fence, overhanging a cemetery gateway, edging a waterway. National Geographic, "CREATE A FREE NAT GEO ACCOUNT TO CONTINUE READING," 18 May 2020 To illustrate the importance of arrivals from nearby countries, Eurostat figures show that French overnight stays in Italy hit 14 million last year, while those from Germany came in at 13.6 million, edging Italians themselves at 13.5 million. Fox News, "Italy to open borders after three months of severe coronavirus lockdown," 16 May 2020 To illustrate the importance of arrivals from nearby countries, Eurostat figures show that French overnight stays in Italy hit 14 million last year, while those from Germany came in at 13.6 million, edging Italians themselves at 13.5 million. USA TODAY, "Italy seeks to boost tourism by opening regional and international borders June 3," 16 May 2020 Preen by Thornton Bregazzi topped off a tulle gown with silver ballet pumps, Givenchy belted its voluminous creation, and Loewe gave lilac a thoroughly modern twist with white piped edging. Georgia Murray, refinery29.com, "Fashion’s Spring Colors Are Good Enough To Eat," 12 May 2020 Many of the hikers in ball caps, running shoes and face masks returned home with memories of seeing mountain quail, deer and snakes moving through the brush edging the park’s paved lanes, rugged trails and fire breaks. Los Angeles Times, "More Southern California beaches and trails reopened as coronavirus restrictions eased," 9 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'edge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of edge

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for edge

Noun

Middle English egge, going back to Old English ecg "cutting side of a blade, border," going back to Germanic *agjō "cutting side of a blade" (whence also Old Frisian eg "cutting side of a blade, sword," Old Saxon eggia, Old High German egga, ekka "cutting side of a blade, border, point, corner," Old Norse egg "cutting side of a blade"), feminine noun derivative from Indo-European *h2eḱ- "sharp, pointed," whence also Latin aciēs "sharp part of a weapon"

Note: The base *h2eḱ- "sharp, pointed" was productive of a large number of suffixed derivatives in the Indo-European daughter languages. Latin had a verbal base deriving from h2eḱ-eh1- "to be sharp" (see acetic acid, acid entry 2) and a presumed adjectival stem *acū- "sharp" (see acute). An apparently isolated derivative is Greek akmḗ "highest point" (see acme). For the derivative *h2eḱ-r-/h2oḱ-r-, with outcomes in Greek, Latin, and other languages, see acro-, mediocre. See also awn, ear entry 2.

Verb

Middle English eggen "to set (the teeth) on edge," derivative of egge edge entry 1

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Time Traveler for edge

Time Traveler

The first known use of edge was before the 12th century

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Statistics for edge

Last Updated

17 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Edge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/edge. Accessed 2 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for edge

edge

noun
How to pronounce edge (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of edge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the line or part where an object or area begins or ends
: the part of a blade that cuts
: the sharpness of a blade

edge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of edge (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give an edge to (something)
: to be on the edge of (something)
: to move slowly or with small movements in a specified direction

edge

noun
\ ˈej How to pronounce edge (audio) \

Kids Definition of edge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the line where a surface ends : margin, border He sat on the edge of the stage.
2 : the cutting side of a blade

Other Words from edge

edged \ ˈejd \ adjective

edge

verb
edged; edging

Kids Definition of edge (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give a border to The sleeve was edged with lace.
2 : to move slowly and gradually Our raft edged towards the falls.

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More from Merriam-Webster on edge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for edge

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with edge

Spanish Central: Translation of edge

Nglish: Translation of edge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of edge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on edge

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