redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing; redresses

Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a(1) : to set right : remedy looked to charity, not to legislation, to redress social wrongs— W. R. Inge
(2) : to make up for : compensate
b : to remove the cause of (a grievance or complaint)
c : to exact reparation for : avenge
2 archaic
a : to requite (a person) for a wrong or loss
b : heal

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) , ˈrē-ˌdres \

Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : relief from distress
b : means or possibility of seeking a remedy without redress
2 : compensation for wrong or loss : reparation
3a : an act or instance of redressing

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Other Words from redress

Verb

redresser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for redress

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

Examples of redress in a Sentence

Verb It is time to redress the injustices of the past. the belief that redressing a murder with another murder, even if carried out by the state, is not morally justified Noun the new skis were certainly an adequate redress for the lost snowboard
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Reagan's philosophy powered years of unfettered capitalism that helped widen economic inequalities, which two subsequent Democratic presidents struggled to redress. Stephen Collinson, CNN, "Joe Biden to showcase his moderate radicalism in his big congressional address," 28 Apr. 2021 Biden should also redress the Trump administration's anti-refugee policies by increasing refugee admissions in fiscal years 2022, '23 and '24. Veena Iyer, Star Tribune, "Biden is, so far, no Walter Mondale," 22 Apr. 2021 The causes were multiple, but a significant contributory factor was Lyndon B. Johnson’s ‘Great Society’ spending spree, which sought to eradicate poverty and redress racial inequalities. Steven Desmyter, Forbes, "Will Inflation Revive The American Dream?," 20 Apr. 2021 For underserved and overpoliced Black and Brown communities, Fagon sees this as an opportunity to redress the balance. Deidre Dyer, Vogue, "A Black-Owned Hemp Farm Flourishes in Hudson Valley," 20 Apr. 2021 White Lies Matter, for its part, maintains that members stole the statue to redress previous wrongdoings. Isis Davis-marks, Smithsonian Magazine, "Activist Group Threatens to Turn Stolen Confederate Monument Into Toilet Unless Demands Are Met," 8 Apr. 2021 Sixteen recent acquisitions of contemporary art are also on view (ongoing), their welcome emphasis on work by women and people of color part of a larger, growing effort among museums to redress past exclusion. Los Angeles Times, "Review: LACMA reopens with six shows that hint to what the future museum will be like," 1 Apr. 2021 The settlement’s intent is to redress chronic underfunding. Wsj Noted., WSJ, "Here’s Why Maryland Plans to Pay $577 Million to Four Black Colleges," 26 Mar. 2021 Doing so would both help redress a fundamental global inequity and also push against the soft-power inroads of Russia and China, countries whose own cheaper vaccines are being taken up across the developing world. Washington Post, "The pandemic leads to new forms of inequality," 19 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The lawsuit alleges that Paxton’s actions block the plaintiffs’ rights to speak in a public forum and also violates their right to access important government information and petition the government for redress of grievances. James Barragán, Dallas News, "Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sued for blocking constituents on Twitter," 8 Apr. 2021 As the debate is pushed mainstream, cities such as Asheville, North Carolina, and Evanston, Illinois, have recently adopted measures to provide redress at the local level. ABC News, "House committee advances reparations bill: 'We're giving America the opportunity for redemption'," 15 Apr. 2021 Without some kind of restrictive legal covenant covering his giving, Huntsman seems to have little redress in clawing the money back. The Salt Lake Tribune, "James Huntsman isn’t the first to sue the LDS Church for a tithing refund. Do any of them stand a chance?," 4 Apr. 2021 It’s a First Amendment right to petition your government for redress of grievances. al, "Mo Brooks calls U.S. Capitol rioters ‘fools’; says sedition charges up to Justice Department," 27 Mar. 2021 This plan, however, is far from the direct payments that have come to characterize reparations — redress for slavery and the subsequent racial discrimination in the United States. NBC News, "Evanston is the first U.S. city to issue slavery reparations. Experts say it's a noble start.," 26 Mar. 2021 This would be significant for offering some redress for the rampant antiblackness that still exists among the Five Tribes and throughout Indian Country. Lisa Deaderick, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Descendants of enslaved Black people have right to Indigenous citizenship," 14 Mar. 2021 Shannon Liss-Riordan, a Boston attorney who has filed misclassification cases on behalf of gig workers and janitors said the decision should help California workers seeking redress over wage violations that occurred before April 2018. Carolyn Said, SFChronicle.com, "California high court: ‘ABC test’ for gig workers is retroactive, in blow to Uber, Lyft," 14 Jan. 2021 The bank would have faced a £37.2 million penalty if the FCA hadn’t taken into account its redress program. Sabela Ojea, WSJ, "U.K. Watchdog Fines Barclays Units $34.7 Million Over Treatment of Customers in Arrears," 15 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of redress

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for redress

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French redresser to set upright, restore, redress, from re- + dresser to set straight — more at dress

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Time Traveler for redress

Time Traveler

The first known use of redress was in the 14th century

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Statistics for redress

Last Updated

1 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Redress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/redress. Accessed 11 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for redress

redress

verb

English Language Learners Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to correct (something that is unfair or wrong)

redress

noun

English Language Learners Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : something (such as money) that is given to someone to make up for damage, trouble, etc.

redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing

Kids Definition of redress

: to set right : remedy The court will redress an injustice.

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres, ˈrē-ˌdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \

Legal Definition of redress

1a : relief from distress
b : a means of obtaining a remedy
2 : compensation (as damages) for wrong or loss

Other Words from redress

redress \ ri-​ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \ transitive verb

Comments on redress

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