excess

noun
ex·​cess | \ ik-ˈses How to pronounce excess (audio) , ˈek-ˌses How to pronounce excess (audio) \

Definition of excess

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : the state or an instance of surpassing usual, proper, or specified limits : superfluity
b : the amount or degree by which one thing or quantity exceeds another an excess of 10 bushels
2 : undue or immoderate indulgence : intemperance also : an act or instance of intemperance prevent excesses and abuses by newly created local powers — Albert Shanker
in excess of
: to an amount or degree beyond : over

excess

adjective

Definition of excess (Entry 2 of 3)

: more than the usual, proper, or specified amount

excess

verb
excessed; excessing; excesses

Definition of excess (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to eliminate the position of excessed several teachers because of budget cutbacks

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Examples of excess in a Sentence

Noun They were equipped with an excess of provisions. The tests found an excess of sodium in his blood. He lived a life of excess. The movie embraces all the worst excesses of popular American culture. the violent excesses of the military regime He apologized for his past excesses. Adjective Basketball provided an outlet for their excess energy. She is trying to eliminate excess fat and calories from her diet.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Many plants, including chiles, herbs and spices, produce compounds that can be irritating when encountered in excess, but add complexity to foods in moderation. Steven D. Munger, The Conversation, 5 Oct. 2021 In a person with type 2 diabetes, the cells in your muscles, fat and liver don’t respond to insulin properly so an excess of glucose remains in your bloodstream, which can have dangerous consequences if left untreated. Kaitlyn Pirie, Good Housekeeping, 3 Oct. 2021 That substance, if consumed in excess, wears away at the boundaries that separate our world from other, darker ones. Gregory Hays, The New York Review of Books, 29 Apr. 2021 Jeremy Jones, a prominent big mountain snowboarder, has climbed—and then snowboarded down—peaks in excess of 20,000 feet. Courtney Linder, Popular Mechanics, 30 Sep. 2021 The pair’s take from the transactions was in excess of $100 million. Cheryl Hall, Dallas News, 30 Sep. 2021 Caffeine, for example, a popular stimulant ingredient used in pre-workout powders, could lead to potential side effects if taken in excess. Sara M Moniuszko, USA TODAY, 17 Sep. 2021 Pesticides are sprayed in excess because humans no longer tend to the fields. Katrina Miller, Wired, 16 Aug. 2021 In this case, imagine if the Fed were to sell bonds in excess to Pittsburgh banks in order to shrink the increasingly optimistic financial flows in the city related to robotics and other forward-thinking technology. John Tamny, Forbes, 13 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The value of everything above to the investor, plus any hard assets, less the excess cash over 60 to 90 days of operating capital, reduced by your current debt and some of your long-term debt. Moira Vetter, Forbes, 29 Sep. 2021 When Social Security was in surplus, the excess cash went to the U.S. Treasury in exchange for interest-bearing, special Treasury notes. Scott Burns, Dallas News, 26 Sep. 2021 The unaccounted-for excess deaths may also reflect the price of disruptions in medical care and other indirect byproducts of the pandemic. Bloomberg News, oregonlive, 21 Sep. 2021 The excess cash is dragging down margins because banks aren’t earning much on it. David Benoit, WSJ, 12 July 2021 One change requires that excess cash be equally divided between taxpayers and public schools. John Myers, Los Angeles Times, 10 May 2021 Instead of gorging on Bitcoin, Musk could pay a special dividend with this excess cash, and let shareholders decide whether to buy Bitcoin or do something else with the cash. Shawn Tully, Fortune, 28 Apr. 2021 Still, the purchase prices are so high that some people wonder how the money will ever be made back, and if the back-catalog game is merely awash in the kind of excess cash that is seeking high returns and forming bubbles elsewhere in the economy. Samanth Subramanian, Quartz, 13 Mar. 2021 Still, the shift has caused stock markets to wobble in recent days over fears that central banks could lift interest rates to prevent soaring prices and might rein in asset purchases sooner than anticipated, taking excess cash out of markets. Hanna Ziady, CNN, 7 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That suggests existing protections won’t have much force until the state extends its new worker-misclassification law (which cracks down on employers who rely to excess on gig workers) to temporary employees. Timothy Noah, The New Republic, 22 Sep. 2021 You’ve been quoted as saying that that is really what the film is about — not so much drinking to excess as embracing the uncontrollable. David Fear, Rolling Stone, 15 Apr. 2021 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019 Meacham is a nonideological historian and McGraw is a country star, two professions that were built for caution, something McGraw occasionally takes to excess. Allison Stewart, chicagotribune.com, 11 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'excess.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of excess

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1971, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for excess

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French exces, from Late Latin excessus, from Latin, departure, projection, from excedere to exceed

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Time Traveler for excess

Time Traveler

The first known use of excess was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near excess

excerptible

excess

excess condemnation

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Statistics for excess

Last Updated

17 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Excess.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/excess. Accessed 17 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for excess

excess

noun

English Language Learners Definition of excess

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an amount that is more than the usual or necessary amount
: behavior that is considered wrong because it goes beyond what is usual, normal, or proper
: actions or ways of behaving that go beyond what is usual or proper

excess

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of excess (Entry 2 of 2)

: more than is usual, allowed, or needed

excess

noun
ex·​cess | \ ik-ˈses How to pronounce excess (audio) , ˈek-ˌses \

Kids Definition of excess

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a state of being more than enough Don't eat to excess.
2 : the amount by which something is or has too much

excess

adjective

Kids Definition of excess (Entry 2 of 2)

: more than is usual or acceptable

excess

adjective
ex·​cess

Legal Definition of excess

: more than a usual or specified amount specifically : additional to an amount specified under another insurance policy excess coverage excess insurance

More from Merriam-Webster on excess

Nglish: Translation of excess for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of excess for Arabic Speakers

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