depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) , dē- \
depressed; depressing; depresses

Definition of depress

transitive verb

1 obsolete : repress, subjugate
2a : to press down depress a typewriter key
b : to cause to sink to a lower position
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of drugs that may depress the appetite
4 : sadden, discourage don't let the news depress you
5 : to decrease the market value or marketability of

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Other Words from depress

depressible \ di-​ˈpre-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce depressible (audio) , dē-​ \ adjective

Examples of depress in a Sentence

The news seemed to depress him a little. I don't mean to depress you, but there's no way we can win. We were all depressed by the loss. You shouldn't let this kind of problem depress you. These changes could depress the economy. Market conditions are likely to depress earnings in the next quarter. depressing the price of a stock Slowly depress the car's brake pedal. Depress the “shift” key on your keyboard. The doctor will depress your tongue and look at your throat.
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Recent Examples on the Web The grim news reinforces the company’s plan to cut tens of thousands of employees starting Oct. 1 as the pandemic continues to depress airline travel. BostonGlobe.com, "We need clarity on masks, chain retailers tell governors," 8 July 2020 The resurgence of the virus in many states, including California, Texas and Florida, probably will further depress air travel. Washington Post, "Delta, United among airlines that will accept government loans under Cares Act," 7 July 2020 The relatively low Internet access might depress productivity in emerging and developing countries. CNN, "Low internet access is driving inequality," 5 July 2020 If your firing-hand thumb is not strong enough or long enough to complete this action, utilize your support-hand thumb to depress the slide release. Chris Mudgett, Outdoor Life, "You Just Purchased a Handgun for Personal Defense, Now What?," 1 July 2020 This would depress overall consumer spending by several hundred billion dollars in the second half of 2020, which by itself could cause a recession-level contraction in economic output. Michael R. Strain, Houston Chronicle, "Opinion: How Congress can scale back unemployment benefits," 3 July 2020 As outbreaks flare up across the Sun Belt in states like Arizona, California, Florida and Texas, a national mask mandate could partially substitute for more lockdowns that threaten to depress economic activity even further, Goldman Sachs says. Jessica Menton, USA TODAY, "A national mask mandate could lower virus infections and help recovery, Goldman Sachs says," 30 June 2020 Travel trouble continues: Hilton Hotels is laying off 2,100 employees, or roughly 22% of its corporate workforce, as the lingering effects of coronavirus continue to depress demand for leisure and corporate travel. Allison Morrow, CNN, "Zoom is worth more than Uber and Cameo is thriving: This is 2020," 16 June 2020 The drop has the potential to depress participation in a November presidential election that had been widely expected to break all records for turnout, the center’s director, David Becker, said Friday. Michael Wines, BostonGlobe.com, "COVID-19 changed how we vote. It could also change who votes.," 15 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of depress

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for depress

Middle English, from Middle French depresser, from Latin depressus, past participle of deprimere to press down, from de- + premere to press — more at press

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Time Traveler for depress

Time Traveler

The first known use of depress was in the 14th century

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Statistics for depress

Last Updated

19 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Depress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/depress. Accessed 11 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for depress

depress

verb
How to pronounce depress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of depress

: to make (someone) feel sad : to make (someone) depressed
: to decrease the activity or strength of (something)
formal : to press (something) down

depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \
depressed; depressing

Kids Definition of depress

1 : to press down Depress the “enter” key.
2 : to make sad or discouraged Don't let the news depress you.
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of Bad weather had depressed sales.
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \

Medical Definition of depress

1 : to diminish the activity, strength, or yield of able to depress irritability of the heart muscle by the use of such a drug as procaine
2 : to lower in spirit or mood

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More from Merriam-Webster on depress

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for depress

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with depress

Spanish Central: Translation of depress

Nglish: Translation of depress for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of depress for Arabic Speakers

Comments on depress

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