redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing; redresses

Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a(1) : to set right : remedy looked to charity, not to legislation, to redress social wrongs— W. R. Inge
(2) : to make up for : compensate
b : to remove the cause of (a grievance or complaint)
c : to exact reparation for : avenge
2 archaic
a : to requite (a person) for a wrong or loss
b : heal

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) , ˈrē-ˌdres \

Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : relief from distress
b : means or possibility of seeking a remedy without redress
2 : compensation for wrong or loss : reparation
3a : an act or instance of redressing

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Other Words from redress

Verb

redresser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for redress

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

Examples of redress in a Sentence

Verb It is time to redress the injustices of the past. the belief that redressing a murder with another murder, even if carried out by the state, is not morally justified Noun the new skis were certainly an adequate redress for the lost snowboard
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Imagine the opportunity to reward political loyalty, redress a longtime grievance and, in an instant, transform someone’s life for the better. Los Angeles Times, "News Analysis: In filling Senate seat, Newsom made an easy thing seem hard," 24 Dec. 2020 Should it be used to get the economy back on track, or to redress longstanding health inequities? Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, "Haves vs. have-nots: Who ‘deserves’ to be next in line for the COVID-19 vaccine?," 19 Dec. 2020 The principle of reciprocity was necessary to redress this imbalance. Mackubin Thomas Owens, Washington Examiner, "America first is not America alone," 10 Dec. 2020 Despite the Trump administration’s efforts to redress the balance of trade in the U.S. Rey Mashayekhi, Fortune, "How China has used the pandemic to pull ahead on trade, by the numbers," 8 Dec. 2020 Some top design institutions are ramping up efforts to redress the imbalance. Stephen Wallis New York Times, Star Tribune, "Furniture design industry awakens to its lack of diversity," 6 Nov. 2020 Courts can award monetary damages to redress any harm that flows from the speech. Jack Greiner, The Enquirer, "Strictly Legal: California court botches free speech case," 25 Nov. 2020 For Conway, the event points to a way that society can redress historical wrongs without sweeping them under the rug. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, "Column: IBM apologizes for firing a transgender pioneer, 52 years late," 23 Nov. 2020 By the late ’40s and early ’50s, however, the U.S. government began to redress the discriminatory laws that had long targeted Asian Americans. Karen Fang, Smithsonian Magazine, "How Tyrus Wong’s Christmas Cards Captivated the American Public," 19 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The bank would have faced a £37.2 million penalty if the FCA hadn’t taken into account its redress program. Sabela Ojea, WSJ, "U.K. Watchdog Fines Barclays Units $34.7 Million Over Treatment of Customers in Arrears," 15 Dec. 2020 The plaintiffs in the German case are seeking redress in U.S. courts because the German Advisory Commission on the return of cultural property seized as a result of Nazi persecution has ruled that the sales were not coerced. Ron Kampeas, sun-sentinel.com, "Trump administration calling for Holocaust restitution cases outside U.S. meets with skepticism," 9 Dec. 2020 The law sat dormant for nearly 200 years, but in recent decades has resurfaced as a tool of human rights activists seeking redress for victims abroad. Kristen Leigh Painter, Star Tribune, "Cargill argues in front of Supreme Court in child labor case," 1 Dec. 2020 Now, an advocacy group for women prisoners, as the pair seek legal and financial redress. The Economist, "A shameful history A new film chronicles the illegal sterilisation of women in prisons," 25 Nov. 2020 International investigation and condemnation could reinforce the political will within the U.S. to investigate these crimes, establish a mechanism for accountability for the perpetrators, and seek redress for victims. Laura Weiss, The New Republic, "The Government’s Human Cruelty Will Outlive Trump," 25 Nov. 2020 Under his presidency, reform-minded men and women smashed corporate monopolies, won recognition for organized labor, rid their food and drugs of poison, and began the redress of the country’s natural environment. Kevin Baker, Harper's Magazine, "You Say You Want a Revolution," 27 Oct. 2020 In 1999, the Tribunal concluded that the river was a treasure -- or taonga -- to Whanganui Māori, and urged redress. Julia Hollingsworth, CNN, "This river in New Zealand is legally a person. Here's how it happened," 11 Dec. 2020 Under that settlement, the Justice Department said U.S. Bank, PNC and Northstar will provide more than $74 million in redress payments to homeowners. Washington Post, "Nationstar Mortgage agrees to a $91 million settlement for mishandling foreclosures and borrowers’ payments," 8 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'redress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of redress

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for redress

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French redresser to set upright, restore, redress, from re- + dresser to set straight — more at dress

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Time Traveler for redress

Time Traveler

The first known use of redress was in the 14th century

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Statistics for redress

Last Updated

13 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Redress.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/redress. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for redress

redress

verb
How to pronounce redress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of redress

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to correct (something that is unfair or wrong)

redress

noun
How to pronounce redress (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of redress (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : something (such as money) that is given to someone to make up for damage, trouble, etc.

redress

verb
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \
redressed; redressing

Kids Definition of redress

: to set right : remedy The court will redress an injustice.

redress

noun
re·​dress | \ ri-ˈdres, ˈrē-ˌdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \

Legal Definition of redress

1a : relief from distress
b : a means of obtaining a remedy
2 : compensation (as damages) for wrong or loss

Other Words from redress

redress \ ri-​ˈdres How to pronounce redress (audio) \ transitive verb

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Comments on redress

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