correct

verb
cor·rect | \ kə-ˈrekt \
corrected; correcting; corrects

Definition of correct 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make or set right : amend correct an error The editor corrected the author's manuscript.

b : counteract, neutralize correct a harmful tendency

c : to alter or adjust so as to bring to some standard or required condition correct a lens for spherical aberration She's having surgery to correct her vision.

2a : to discipline or punish (someone) for some fault or lapse … I was most rude then. Only a small boy, Sir, and I was corrected for it, I assure you, by my father … —Rex Ingamells

b : to point out usually for amendment the errors or faults of spent the day correcting tests

correct

adjective

Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : conforming to an approved or conventional standard correct behavior

2 : conforming to or agreeing with fact, logic, or known truth a correct response

3 : conforming to a set figure enclosed the correct return postage

4 : conforming to the strict requirements of a specific ideology or set of beliefs or values environmentally correct spiritually correct

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Other words from correct

Verb

correctable \kə-ˈrek-tə-bəl \ adjective
corrector \kə-ˈrek-tər \ noun

Adjective

correctly \kə-ˈrek(t)-lē \ adverb
correctness \kə-ˈrek(t)-nəs \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for correct

Verb

correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects. correct your spelling rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed. rectify a misguided policy emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript. emend a text remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil. set out to remedy the evils of the world redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance. redress past social injustices amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes amend a law , reform implying drastic change plans to reform the court system , and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes. revise the schedule

synonyms see in addition punish

Adjective

correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice, right mean conforming to fact, standard, or truth. correct usually implies freedom from fault or error. correct answers socially correct dress accurate implies fidelity to fact or truth attained by exercise of care. an accurate description exact stresses a very strict agreement with fact, standard, or truth. exact measurements precise adds to exact an emphasis on sharpness of definition or delimitation. precise calibration nice stresses great precision and delicacy of adjustment or discrimination. makes nice distinctions right is close to correct but has a stronger positive emphasis on conformity to fact or truth rather than mere absence of error or fault. the right thing to do

Adjective

correct, exact, and accurate mean agreeing with a fact, truth, or standard. correct is used for something that contains no errors. Can you give me correct directions? exact is used for something that agrees very closely with fact or truth. I need the exact measurements of the room. accurate is used when great care has been taken to make sure that something agrees with the facts. He gave an accurate description of the scene.

Examples of correct in a Sentence

Verb

I hate it when she corrects my grammar. Please correct your essay for punctuation errors. Our teacher hasn't finished correcting our tests yet. He corrects papers with a red pen. We are finding ways to correct this difficult situation. We'll correct the problem with the circuit as soon as possible. These medicines are used for correcting chemical imbalances in the brain.

Adjective

What's the correct answer to this question? Her watch never tells the correct time. an anatomically correct drawing of the human body Did I give you the correct change? With the correct amount of water and sunlight, the plant will grow well.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But there was also plenty to correct for both Bridges and his teammates, as there should be at this stage. Rick Bonnell, charlotteobserver, "Hornets rookie Miles Bridges finds himself in a summer game of trial-and-error," 10 July 2018 The fear is that Mr Trump’s tariffs are less a way to correct legitimate trade grievances than a step towards a much darker world. The Economist, "Sino-American interdependence has been a force for geopolitical stability," 23 June 2018 The letter serves as a snapshot of Cantrell's transition from the City Council to the city's highest office, a position that often requires defending the actions of city employees or acting swiftly to correct them. Kevin Litten, NOLA.com, "Mayor Cantrell doesn't like Giarrusso's 'tone' in letter to Sewerage & Water Board," 30 May 2018 But after Finance Director Lisa Moody reminded the DPW chief that funding for the contract falls under the fiscal year 2019 budget that doesn’t go into effect until July 1, Kline quickly corrected himself and said the work would begin in July. Aegis Staff Report, The Aegis, "Lane addition to help ease bottleneck on Bel Air's Marketplace Drive," 24 May 2018 The work that can be done to correct architecture’s systemic inequities has already begun—and there are more measures the architecture industry can take at every level. Diana Budds, Curbed, "How architecture can rebuild itself post #MeToo," 21 May 2018 This is best for hiding the fact that my eyes are not symmetrical—a result of being born with ptosis, a drooping eyelid, and many operations to correct it. Gal Beckerman, The New Republic, "Don’t Blame Phones for Narcissism," 7 May 2018 Mel Krodman is a must-see as Smee, his hilarious pantomiming companion who moronically corrects him. Hugh Hunter, Philly.com, "'Peter and the Starcatcher' at Theatre Horizon: Unbridled, unpredictable, riotously funny," 4 May 2018 Today, Kennon favors a concept called Asset-Based Community Development, which focuses on multiplying the assets within a community instead of working to correct deficiencies. Janene Holzberg, Howard County Times, "Chapter and verse on Tonya Kennon, Howard County's new library director," 4 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

And this is during the Obama administration, correct? Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Matt Cutts of the U.S. Digital Service on Recode Decode," 12 July 2018 During his discussions, Rubio said he was told that the Haitian government’s calculations of how much fuel prices would have to rise in order to bring the country’s prices in line with rising global oil prices were correct. Jacqueline Charles, miamiherald, "Haiti’s low fuel prices unfairly benefit the rich and need to be raised, IMF says," 12 July 2018 United were seemingly unconvinced by Morata's potential to thrive in the Premier League, an assessment proven to be correct in hindsight after a poor debut season with Chelsea and moved quickly. SI.com, "On This Day in 2017: Manchester United Signed Romelu Lukaku From Everton in £75m Deal," 10 July 2018 But Trump is correct that only four NATO members — the United States, the United Kingdom, Estonia and Greece — currently meet the 2 percent expectation. Gregory Korte, USA TODAY, "As he arrives at NATO summit, President Trump hounds allies over 'delinquent' defense spending," 10 July 2018 If that estimate is correct, that means an additional 9,100 immigrant children would be detained and housed by the U.S. government in the four weeks beginning Tuesday. Ed Kilgore, Daily Intelligencer, "Report: Team Trump Planning on Surge in Detention of Immigrant Minors," 10 July 2018 If that is correct, there is a chance that the tensions will ease. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Can the US-China trade war be stopped? 11 experts weigh in.," 8 July 2018 Though genetic testing initially indicated the twins were both boys, a follow-up revealed there had been a mix-up and that Alessandro had been correct after all. Ana Calderone, PEOPLE.com, "Donatella Arpaia's Son Dreamed About What She Should Name Her Twins — But She Has Other Plans!," 6 July 2018 If tracking is correct, the follow-up should buzz between $75 million and $85 million its domestic debut, ahead of the $57.2 million launch of Ant-Man in summer 2015. Pamela Mcclintock, The Hollywood Reporter, "Box Office: 'The First Purge' Sets Off Fireworks With $9.3M Wednesday, 'Jurassic World 2' Stays No. 1," 4 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'correct.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of correct

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1668, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for correct

Verb

Middle English, from Latin correctus, past participle of corrigere, from com- + regere to lead straight — more at right

Adjective

Middle English, corrected, from Latin correctus, from past participle of corrigere — see correct entry 1

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Statistics for correct

Last Updated

12 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for correct

The first known use of correct was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for correct

correct

verb

English Language Learners Definition of correct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to change (something) so that it is right, true, proper, etc. : to make (something) correct

: to mark the errors on (something that a person has written)

: to deal with or take care of (a problem, bad situation, etc.) successfully

correct

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

: true or accurate : agreeing with facts

: having no errors or mistakes

: proper or appropriate in a particular situation

correct

verb
cor·rect | \ kə-ˈrekt \
corrected; correcting

Kids Definition of correct

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make or set right Please correct any misspelled words.

2 : to change or adjust so as to bring to some standard or to a required condition My watch was slow, so I corrected it. Glasses will correct your vision.

3 : to punish in order to improve … Buldeo went out angrily … anxious to correct Mowgli for not taking better care of the herd. —Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book

4 : to show how a thing can be improved or made right She corrected the students' papers.

correct

adjective

Kids Definition of correct (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : free from mistakes : accurate the correct answer

2 : meeting or agreeing with some standard : appropriate correct behavior correct dress for school

Other words from correct

correctly adverb
correctness noun

correct

transitive verb
cor·rect | \ kə-ˈrekt \

Medical Definition of correct 

: to alter or adjust so as to bring to some standard or required condition correct a lens for spherical aberration

Other words from correct

correctable \-ˈrek-tə-bəl \ adjective

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Comments on correct

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