precise

adjective
pre·​cise | \ pri-ˈsīs \

Definition of precise

1 : exactly or sharply defined or stated
2 : minutely exact
3 : strictly conforming to a pattern, standard, or convention
4 : distinguished from every other at just that precise moment

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Other Words from precise

preciseness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for precise

correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice, right mean conforming to fact, standard, or truth. correct usually implies freedom from fault or error. correct answers socially correct dress accurate implies fidelity to fact or truth attained by exercise of care. an accurate description exact stresses a very strict agreement with fact, standard, or truth. exact measurements precise adds to exact an emphasis on sharpness of definition or delimitation. precise calibration nice stresses great precision and delicacy of adjustment or discrimination. makes nice distinctions right is close to correct but has a stronger positive emphasis on conformity to fact or truth rather than mere absence of error or fault. the right thing to do

Examples of precise in a Sentence

Be sure to take precise measurements before you cut the cloth. The dating of very old materials has become more precise with new instruments. The word has a very precise meaning. Can you find a more precise term than “good” to describe the movie? Could you be a little more precise about what happened? She is very precise in her work.
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Recent Examples on the Web

And then the amount of herbicides and fungicides that need to be sprayed is far less and more precise, benefiting crop yields and the environment at large. Henry Robertson, Popular Mechanics, "An App Could Be the Key to Saving Crops from Pests and Pathogens," 4 Dec. 2018 For that price, MakerBot is touting hardware and software changes that make printing more precise and reliable, without requiring a lot of tinkering or the funds for a full-scale industrial printer. Adi Robertson, The Verge, "MakerBot’s new 3D printer shows how much it’s changed in nine years," 11 Dec. 2018 In contrast with the British, who favored nighttime area bombing, American doctrine relied on daytime bombing—more precise and thus more destructive of the intended target but also making crews more vulnerable to German defenders. David A. Price, WSJ, "‘Big Week’ Review: The Seven-Day Blow," 23 Nov. 2018 Bangladesh and Pakistan, another top troop contributor, also stressed the importance of Security Council mandates being precise and achievable, with adequate funds and manpower. Fox News, "US seeks tougher UN action against peacekeepers' failures," 12 Sep. 2018 The more layers, the more precise and invisible the stitching and the more brilliant the colors, the finer the mola. Todd Plummer, Vogue, "Gigi Burris Finds Muses, Monkeys, and Major Inspiration in Panama," 19 July 2018 This company can dance up a cavalry charge: The show is a feast of surprisingly precise and athletic tap. John Timpane, Philly.com, "Bucks County's '42nd Street': From Allentown (!) to Broadway, with great song and dance," 8 July 2018 Your ability to be precise and thorough will make a difference. BostonGlobe.com, "Horoscope," 17 June 2018 The youngest woman at the table continues to search for the precise term for this physiological interplay, and then finds it: Russian nesting dolls. Mariano Vivanco; Styled By Simon Robins, Harper's BAZAAR, "The New American Dynasty," 3 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'precise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of precise

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for precise

Middle English, from Middle French precis, from Latin praecisus, past participle of praecidere to cut off, from prae- + caedere to cut

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Statistics for precise

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for precise

The first known use of precise was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for precise

precise

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of precise

: very accurate and exact

—used to refer to an exact and particular time, location, etc.

: very careful and exact about the details of something

precise

adjective
pre·​cise | \ pri-ˈsīs \

Kids Definition of precise

1 : exactly stated or explained He gave precise instructions.
2 : very exact : accurate The clay for glaze was mixed in precise proportions with water and wood ash.— Linda Sue Park, A Single Shard
3 : being exactly the one mentioned or indicated and no other At that precise moment, the telephone rang.

Other Words from precise

precisely adverb

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More from Merriam-Webster on precise

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with precise

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for precise

Spanish Central: Translation of precise

Nglish: Translation of precise for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of precise for Arabic Speakers

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