reclaim

verb
re·​claim | \ ri-ˈklām \
reclaimed; reclaiming; reclaims

Definition of reclaim

transitive verb

1a : to recall from wrong or improper conduct : reform
b : tame, subdue
2a : to rescue from an undesirable state also : to restore to a previous natural state reclaim mining sites
b : to make available for human use by changing natural conditions reclaim swampland
3 : to obtain from a waste product or by-product : recover reclaimed plastic
4a : to demand or obtain the return of
b : to regain possession of

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Other Words from reclaim

reclaimable \ ri-​ˈklā-​mə-​bəl \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for reclaim

rescue, deliver, redeem, ransom, reclaim, save mean to set free from confinement or danger. rescue implies freeing from imminent danger by prompt or vigorous action. rescued the crew of a sinking ship deliver implies release usually of a person from confinement, temptation, slavery, or suffering. delivered his people from bondage redeem implies releasing from bondage or penalties by giving what is demanded or necessary. job training designed to redeem school dropouts from chronic unemployment ransom specifically applies to buying out of captivity. tried to ransom the kidnap victim reclaim suggests a bringing back to a former state or condition of someone or something abandoned or debased. reclaimed long-abandoned farms save may replace any of the foregoing terms; it may further imply a preserving or maintaining for usefulness or continued existence. an operation that saved my life

Examples of reclaim in a Sentence

Sons and daughters are proudly reclaiming the traditions that their parents had forgotten. She reclaimed the title of world champion this year. You might be able to reclaim some of the money you contributed. Environmental groups have been reclaiming contaminated sites. Acres of land were reclaimed by conservationists. The factory reclaims fibers from textile wastes.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Suddenly, a young, dynamic team led by a manager who has become an unexpected national hero is two wins away from reclaiming the cup, while England, which has been cleaved by politics and hasn’t had much to celebrate of late, is going, well, nuts. Ceylan Yeginsu, New York Times, "World Cup Brings England Together at a Time of Division," 10 July 2018 For Tam, the ability to trademark his band was about reclaiming a marginalized identity through reappropriation. Sonia K. Katyal, BostonGlobe.com, "The sudden rush of vulgar trademarks," 23 June 2018 America’s generals and diplomats are confident of reclaiming the area still held by IS. The Economist, "America’s strategy against Islamic State is storing up trouble," 26 May 2018 In a series about McGowan reclaiming her humanity, The Monster is consistently dehumanized, which is appropriate. Daniel Fienberg, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Citizen Rose': TV Review," 30 Jan. 2018 But Kansas reclaimed the top spot last week after Gonzaga’s loss to Tennessee and stayed there after beating reigning national champion Villanova 74-71 at home. Aaron Beard, The Seattle Times, "Kansas, Duke, Tennessee stay 1-2-3 in men’s AP Top 25," 17 Dec. 2018 And now, the time has come for humanity to reclaim it and bring itself to an end. Glenn Fleishman, Fortune, "5 Great Works From Acclaimed Sci-Fi Author Harlan Ellison, Who Died at 84," 29 June 2018 Goalkeeper Hannes Halldorsson saved Lionel Messi's second-half penalty kick, though, preventing Argentina from reclaiming the lead and forcing the favorites to settle for a draw. Julia Poe, SI.com, "How to Watch Argentina vs. Croatia: World Cup Live Stream, TV Channel, Time," 21 June 2018 Girl culture was reclaimed and celebrated by the Riot Grrrl movement, Sassy magazine, websites like gURL.com, government initiatives, subversive feminist musicians and independent films. Allison Yarrow, Time, "How the ’90s Tricked Women Into Thinking They’d Gained Gender Equality," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reclaim.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reclaim

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for reclaim

Middle English reclamen, from Anglo-French reclamer, from Latin reclamare to cry out, protest, from re- + clamare to cry out — more at claim

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Statistics for reclaim

Last Updated

18 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for reclaim

The first known use of reclaim was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for reclaim

reclaim

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reclaim

: to get back (something that was lost or taken away)
: to make (land) available for use by changing its condition
: to get (a usable material) from materials that have been used before

reclaim

verb
re·​claim | \ ri-ˈklām \
reclaimed; reclaiming

Kids Definition of reclaim

1 : to get back (something that was lost or taken away) The skater reclaimed her championship.
2 : to restore to an original state reclaim a swamp
3 : to obtain from a waste product or by-product The bottles are made from reclaimed plastic.

reclaim

transitive verb
re·​claim | \ ˌrē-ˈklām \

Legal Definition of reclaim

1 : to make fit or available for human use reclaiming land that had been strip-mined
2a : to demand the return of by right
b : to regain possession of

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More from Merriam-Webster on reclaim

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with reclaim

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for reclaim

Spanish Central: Translation of reclaim

Nglish: Translation of reclaim for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of reclaim for Arabic Speakers

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