\ ˈtām How to pronounce tame (audio) \
tamer; tamest

Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : reduced from a state of native wildness especially so as to be tractable and useful to humans : domesticated tame animals
2 : made docile and submissive : subdued
3 : lacking spirit, zest, interest, or the capacity to excite : insipid a tame campaign

tame

verb
tamed; taming

Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to reduce from a wild to a domestic state
b : to subject to cultivation
c : to bring under control : harness
2 : to deprive of spirit : humble, subdue the once revolutionary … party, long since tamedThe Times Literary Supplement (London)
3 : to tone down : soften tamed the language in the play

intransitive verb

: to become tame

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Other Words from tame

Adjective

tamely adverb
tameness noun

Verb

tamable or tameable \ ˈtā-​mə-​bəl How to pronounce tameable (audio) \ adjective
tamer noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for tame

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of tame in a Sentence

Adjective The island's birds are quite tame. They ran a pretty tame campaign. Some people were shocked by the movie, but I found the story pretty tame. Members of the audience were too tame to interrupt the speaker. Verb It took a while to tame the horse. the people who tamed the Wild West He struggled to tame his temper. The government needs to do something to tame inflation.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Today, as Albertsons and its competitors navigate a global pandemic, the 2015 retail landscape looks tame by comparison. Beth Kowitt, Fortune, "Why go public amid a raging pandemic? Albertsons CEO explains," 27 June 2020 Around the world, governments that had appeared to tame the virus are adjusting to the reality that the disease is here to stay. Benjamin Mueller, BostonGlobe.com, "How the world is learning to live with a deadly pandemic," 24 June 2020 Since the pandemic began, the US central bank has rolled out a series of emergency lending programs that make its 2008-era response look tame. Matt Egan, CNN, "Star investor: Markets may crash so badly the Fed has to start buying stocks," 16 June 2020 Considering the drop in May sales, the 2.5% drop in prices year over-year, which followed a 0.8% drop in April, seems fairly tame. Kathleen Pender, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Area home sales fall by half in May vs. last year; prices off 2.5%," 16 June 2020 Even his government’s disorderly response helped tame the outbreak, though, and by May cases had dropped enough for restrictions to be largely lifted. The Economist, "An unwanted guest returns The Middle East is fighting a second wave of covid-19," 13 June 2020 Most notably, coronavirus spurred the Federal Reserve to take steps that make its 2008 response look tame by comparison. Matt Egan, CNN, "America is in turmoil and stocks are booming. Is the market broken?," 3 June 2020 Such an exhibit, held without Banksy’s consent, may seem tame to museumgoers in Europe or the U.S. Taylor Luck, The Christian Science Monitor, "Art in the forbidden zone: Inside the Saudi cultural awakening," 27 May 2020 In just 10 generations, Belyaev's lineage of foxes became tame, seeking attention from people and wagging their tails when scientists approached. Jason Bittel, chicagotribune.com, "Tame foxes taught us about animal domestication. But did we get the story wrong?," 6 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Understanding probability wasn’t enough to tame the luck factor. Maria Konnikova, Wired, "Poker and the Psychology of Uncertainty," 23 June 2020 The similarities may not end when the battle to tame the virus has been won, and the debts accumulated by governments have to be repaid. Paul Hannon, WSJ, "Governments May Revisit Postwar Playbook as They Tackle Huge Debts," 14 June 2020 The first country to be affected by the virus — and to apparently tame it — is still trying to dig itself out of a steep economic slump more than a month after reopening. Eliza Mackintosh, CNN, "What you need to know about coronavirus on Tuesday, June 9," 9 June 2020 But even as effective treatments were better able to tame the disease in patients with access to care, Kramer took every new development as a dark omen. Matt Thompson, The Atlantic, "The Curse of the Prophet," 7 June 2020 Cuomo was particularly concerned about daily mass demonstrations in New York City, which is poised to relax some restrictions amid an intense, months-long effort to tame the outbreak. BostonGlobe.com, "Fauci says ‘whole bunch of things’ can be done to reopen schools," 4 June 2020 Built-in image stabilization means details are captured sharply, taming the shakes of your wildest adventures. Jess Grey, Wired, "The Top 3 Rugged Cameras for Daredevil Shooters," 21 Apr. 2020 Doctors think chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine might help COVID-19 patients by inhibiting the coronavirus from entering cells and by taming a potentially deadly overreaction of the patient’s immune system. Kelly Servick, Science | AAAS, "Antimalarials widely used against COVID-19 heighten risk of cardiac arrest. How can doctors minimize the danger?," 21 Apr. 2020 The debt surge is set to shape how governments and the private sector function long after the virus is tamed. Jon Hilsenrath, WSJ, "Coronavirus Crisis Legacy: Mountains of Debt," 9 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tame.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tame

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for tame

Adjective

Middle English, from Old English tam; akin to Old High German zam tame, Latin domare to tame, Greek damnanai

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Time Traveler for tame

Time Traveler

The first known use of tame was before the 12th century

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Statistics for tame

Last Updated

30 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Tame.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tame. Accessed 5 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for tame

How to pronounce tame (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: not wild : trained to obey people
: not afraid of people
: not exciting or interesting

tame

verb

English Language Learners Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (an animal) tame
: to make (something) less wild or difficult to control : to bring (something) under control
\ ˈtām How to pronounce tame (audio) \
tamer; tamest

Kids Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : changed from the wild state so as to become useful and obedient to people : domestic a tame elephant
2 : not afraid of people The chipmunks at the park are very tame.
3 : not interesting : dull a tame movie

Other Words from tame

tamely adverb

tame

verb
tamed; taming

Kids Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or become gentle or obedient They tamed the lion.

Other Words from tame

tamer noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on tame

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tame

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tame

Spanish Central: Translation of tame

Nglish: Translation of tame for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tame for Arabic Speakers

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