1

recapture

noun re·cap·ture \ (ˌ)rē-ˈkap-chər \
Updated on: 3 Dec 2017

Definition of recapture

1 a : the act of retaking
b : an instance of being retaken
2 : the retaking of a prize or goods under international law
3 : a government seizure under law of earnings or profits beyond a fixed amount

Examples of recapture in a Sentence

  1. the recapture of the territory may take longer than expected

Recent Examples of recapture from the Web

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recapture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of recapture

1752


2

recapture

verb

Definition of recapture

transitive verb
1 a : to capture again
b : to experience again
  • by no effort of the imagination could she recapture the ecstasy
  • —Ellen Glasgow
2 : to take (something, such as a portion of earnings or profits above a fixed amount) by law or through negotiations under law

Examples of recapture in a Sentence

  1. The guards recaptured the escaped prisoner.

  2. The soldiers recaptured the hill they had lost the day before.

  3. In the final lap of the race, he recaptured the lead.

  4. They are trying to recapture those happy times they had together.

  5. The documentary recaptures the social tensions of the 1960s.

Recent Examples of recapture from the Web

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recapture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of recapture

1799

recapture Synonyms


Financial Definition of RECAPTURE

recapture

What It Is

A recapture occurs when a person or entity takes back an asset from a buyer under certain conditions.

How It Works

Taxing authorities can implement tax recaptures in which the taxing authority requires a taxpayer to pay taxes on previous years of income (usually when the taxpayer took a deduction or tax credit that the taxing authority decides was inappropriate).

Recapture clauses are common in commercial real estate. Let's say John Doe owns the ABC Shopping Center. He leases some retail space to Company XYZ. The lease says Company XYZ will pay 3% of its sales to John Doe as rent every month for a minimum of $5,000 per month. In other words, Company XYZ has to have revenues of at least $167,000 a month.

Company XYZ only does $100,000 a month. Because the lease has a recapture clause, John Doe can terminate the lease and take back the retail space from Company XYZ. This allows him to get a better-performing tenant in the space rather than having to suffer through the entire term of the lease with a tenant that doesn't generate enough income for him.

Another form of recapture is the depreciation recapture. Let's say John Doe bought a house for $100,000 and ran a business out of it, which allowed him to depreciate the house by $1,000 a year. He lived in the house for five years, thus recording $5,000 of depreciation, and then decided to sell the house and move to Tampa. He sold the house for $120,000.

Because the house is a depreciable asset to John, his profit on the sale of the house is based on the depreciated value of the house (that is, $100,000 - $5,000, or $95,000). It is not based on what he paid for the house ($100,000). So, his sale for $120,000 generates a $25,000 profit, not a $20,000 profit. In other words, John must declare a recaptured gain of $25,000.

Why It Matters

Recaptures are most common in commercial real estate transactions, but they can be in any sort of contract in which an asset exchange takes place and the buyer may want the option to buy back the asset later. And as we've shown, taxing authorities can recapture lost tax revenue when they decide that taxpayers have not been following the rules.


RECAPTURE Defined for English Language Learners

recapture

verb

Definition of recapture for English Language Learners

  • : to catch (someone or something that has escaped)

  • : to gain control of (a place or position) again after losing it

  • : to experience or bring back (a feeling, quality, or situation) again


RECAPTURE Defined for Kids

recapture

verb re·cap·ture \ ˌrē-ˈkap-chər \

Definition of recapture for Students

recaptured; recapturing
1 : to regain possession of Soldiers recaptured the fort.
2 : to experience again
  • I wish I could recapture my youth.

Law Dictionary

1

recapture

transitive verb re·cap·ture \ ˌrē-ˈkap-chər \

legal Definition of recapture

recaptured; recapturing
1 : to capture again
2 : to recover or take (as an excess or gain) by law or agreement; especially : to recover (a tax benefit) by higher or additional taxation of income or property that ceases to qualify for a credit or deduction or by taxing gain realized from the sale or exchange of such property
  • the government recaptured the depreciation by taxing the gain resulting from the difference between the sale price and the basis after depreciation

2

recapture

noun

legal Definition of recapture

1 : the act or process of recapturing
2 : an amount recaptured or subject to recapture


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