rescue

verb
res·​cue | \ ˈre-(ˌ)skyü How to pronounce rescue (audio) \
rescued; rescuing

Definition of rescue

transitive verb

: to free from confinement, danger, or evil : save, deliver They were rescued from the burning building by firefighters. … a volunteer group that rescues and nurtures injured and orphaned wildlife …Australian Geographic (figurative) … the acanthus leaf into which the light fixture on the hall ceiling is set was rescued from a curbside trash heap.— Barbara Deane : such as
a : to take (someone, such as a prisoner) forcibly from custody
b : to recover (something, such as a prize) by force
c : to deliver (a place under siege) by armed force

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Other Words from rescue

rescuable \ ˈre-​(ˌ)skyü-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce rescue (audio) \ adjective
rescue noun
Historians are wary of the notion that, at a critical point in history, a heroic figure, galloping to the rescue, snatches victory from the jaws of defeat … — James MacGregor Burns
rescuer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for rescue

rescue, deliver, redeem, ransom, reclaim, save mean to set free from confinement or danger. rescue implies freeing from imminent danger by prompt or vigorous action. rescued the crew of a sinking ship deliver implies release usually of a person from confinement, temptation, slavery, or suffering. delivered his people from bondage redeem implies releasing from bondage or penalties by giving what is demanded or necessary. job training designed to redeem school dropouts from chronic unemployment ransom specifically applies to buying out of captivity. tried to ransom the kidnap victim reclaim suggests a bringing back to a former state or condition of someone or something abandoned or debased. reclaimed long-abandoned farms save may replace any of the foregoing terms; it may further imply a preserving or maintaining for usefulness or continued existence. an operation that saved my life

Examples of rescue in a Sentence

The survivors were rescued by the Coast Guard. an all-out effort to rescue a beached whale
Recent Examples on the Web But when the trials are interrupted suddenly by unforeseen events and disasters—such as natural disasters, geopolitical conflicts, pandemics and civil unrest—finding and migrating to rescue sites becomes exponentially more difficult. Ariel Katz, Forbes, 2 May 2022 But with the victory also comes a challenge, as Strange must accompany runner-up Doctor Doom on a mission to rescue the latter’s mother from her imprisonment in Hell. Joe George, Men's Health, 25 Apr. 2022 Congregants walked through the disaster zone assessing needs, passing out thousands of dollars in gift cards and helping residents rescue belongings. USA TODAY, 14 Apr. 2022 Earlier this week, Fox News anchor Dana Perino spoke with Save Our Allies founder Sarah Verardo, whose organization helped rescue Hall from Urkaine after his group was attacked. Aaron Parsley, PEOPLE.com, 25 Mar. 2022 Labs are also popular guide and rescue dogs since they can easily be trained to perform a variety of tasks. Zoe Sottile, CNN, 20 Mar. 2022 But his successful bid to reach help at a remote South Atlantic whaling station and rescue his men is considered a heroic feat of endurance. Washington Post, 9 Mar. 2022 However, his successful bid to reach help at a remote South Atlantic whaling station and rescue his men is considered a heroic feat of endurance. Julia Musto, Fox News, 9 Mar. 2022 One of the few brighter, daytime shots comes at the very end as Bruce helps rescue survivors from the arena the morning after the fight with the Riddler’s men. Eliana Dockterman, Time, 4 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rescue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rescue

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rescue

Middle English rescouen, rescuen, from Anglo-French rescure, from re- + escure to shake off, from Latin excutere, from ex- + quatere to shake

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Time Traveler for rescue

Time Traveler

The first known use of rescue was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near rescue

rescriptive

rescue

rescue breathing

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Statistics for rescue

Last Updated

14 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Rescue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rescue. Accessed 26 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for rescue

rescue

verb
res·​cue | \ ˈre-skyü How to pronounce rescue (audio) \
rescued; rescuing

Kids Definition of rescue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to free from danger : save The family's dog was rescued from the fire.

Other Words from rescue

rescuer noun

rescue

noun

Kids Definition of rescue (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of freeing someone or something from danger

More from Merriam-Webster on rescue

Nglish: Translation of rescue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rescue for Arabic Speakers

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