acclaim

1 of 2

verb

ac·​claim ə-ˈklām How to pronounce acclaim (audio)
acclaimed; acclaiming; acclaims

transitive verb

1
: applaud, praise
Critics acclaimed her performance.
2
: to declare by acclamation
was acclaimed president of the society

intransitive verb

: to shout praise or applause
acclaimer noun

acclaim

2 of 2

noun

1
: the act of acclaiming
2
: praise, applause
She deserves acclaim for all her charitable works.

Examples of acclaim in a Sentence

Verb The critics have acclaimed her performance. she has long been acclaimed by the critics for her realistic acting Noun Her performance in the ballet earned her critical acclaim. She deserves acclaim for all her charitable works.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
He’s been a mainstay in the Bay Area music scene for some time as a band leader and supporting musician acclaimed for his talent and versatility. Randy McMullen, The Mercury News, 14 Feb. 2024 Widely acclaimed as the world’s biggest Carnival, the five-day celebration draws some two million revelers each day. Elizabeth Djinis, Smithsonian Magazine, 12 Feb. 2024 Nobody seemed to have the right combination of commercial success and prestige and acclaim for a first-year nod, such as Eminem or Nirvana in years past, although Wayne seems like a likely future candidate. Al Shipley, SPIN, 10 Feb. 2024 For that era, both albums were the rare perfect storm in pop music of being both critically acclaimed widely beloved. Brittany Spanos, Rolling Stone, 8 Feb. 2024 The track off 2022's SOS has been acclaimed for both its groovy rhythm and confessional lyrics, which find the R&B superstar, 34, fantasizing about murdering an ex. Sadie Bell, Peoplemag, 5 Feb. 2024 Seemingly overnight, an actor who has been around for as long as anyone can remember and has spent seven years making a completely successful and vaguely acclaimed television show, has rocketed into the public eye. Vulture, 1 Feb. 2024 The film about the journey to personhood of a plastic doll played by Margot Robbie was not only critically acclaimed, but was also the highest-grossing film worldwide of 2023. Esther Zuckerman, Rolling Stone, 23 Jan. 2024 Though widely acclaimed and with the backing of producers Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg, the Warner Bros. musical has dropped fast in recent weeks. Jake Coyle, Fortune, 22 Jan. 2024
Noun
In 2010, Assange and WikiLeaks gained international attention, and considerable acclaim, for leaks about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Maite Fernández Simon, Washington Post, 20 Feb. 2024 Staples’ debut album, 2015’s Summertime ‘06, garnered him mainstream acclaim after having made mixtape cuts with members of Odd Future, ScHoolboy Q, and Mac Miller. Mankaprr Conteh, Rolling Stone, 15 Feb. 2024 Here’s Looking at You, which Whitener opened in Koreatown in 2016 with managing partner Lien Ta to instant acclaim, was dark on Thursday night. Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times, 9 Feb. 2024 Versailles: Longtime doyenne of Cuban restaurants gets national acclaim and local loyalty with rock- solid food, heaped onto the plate for entree prices that rarely top $8. Miami Herald Archives, Miami Herald, 8 Feb. 2024 Past book trilogy, which debuted in China in 2008 to enormous popularity and acclaim. James Hibberd, The Hollywood Reporter, 1 Feb. 2024 After his run in The Wiz, Battle went on to Tony–winning acclaim, earning the award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical three times: for Sophisticated Ladies in 1981, The Tap Dance Kid in 1984, and Miss Saigon in 1991. Shania Russell, EW.com, 31 Jan. 2024 His business is doing well, after all, with acclaim coming from users on Yelp, Untappd and the likes. Michael McGough, Sacramento Bee, 30 Jan. 2024 Aston Barrett, who as the bass player and musical director for the Wailers — both with Bob Marley and for decades after the singer’s death in 1981 — crafted the hypnotic rhythms and complex melodies that helped elevate reggae to international acclaim, died on Saturday in Miami. Clay Risen, New York Times, 7 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'acclaim.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

borrowed (with assimilation to claim entry 1) from Middle French & Latin; Middle French acclamer, borrowed from Latin acclāmāre "to shout (at or in reaction to), raise an outcry, shout approval," from ad- ad- + clāmāre "to shout" — more at claim entry 1

Noun

derivative of acclaim entry 1

First Known Use

Verb

1626, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1667, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of acclaim was in 1626

Dictionary Entries Near acclaim

Cite this Entry

“Acclaim.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/acclaim. Accessed 24 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

acclaim

1 of 2 verb
ac·​claim ə-ˈklām How to pronounce acclaim (audio)
1
: to welcome with applause or great praise
a novel acclaimed by the critics
2
: to proclaim by or as if by acclamation
acclaimer noun

acclaim

2 of 2 noun
1
: the act of acclaiming
2
Etymology

Verb

from Latin acclamare, literally "to shout at," from ac-, ad- "to, toward" and clamare "to shout" — related to claim, clamor

More from Merriam-Webster on acclaim

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