reckon

verb
reck·​on | \ ˈre-kən \
reckoned; reckoning\ ˈre-​kə-​niŋ , ˈrek-​niŋ \

Definition of reckon

transitive verb

1a : count reckon the days till Christmas
b : estimate, compute reckon the height of a building
c : to determine by reference to a fixed basis the existence of the U.S. is reckoned from the Declaration of Independence
2 : to regard or think of as : consider
3 chiefly dialectal : think, suppose I reckon I've outlived my time— Ellen Glasgow

intransitive verb

1 : to settle accounts
2 : to make a calculation
3a : judge
b chiefly dialectal : suppose, think
4 : to accept something as certain : place reliance I reckon on your promise to help
reckon with
: to take into consideration
reckon without
: to fail to consider : ignore

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Examples of reckon in a Sentence

I reckon that we'll have to leave early. Do you reckon you'll be able to go to the grocery store after work? We'll have to leave early, I reckon. They reckoned that they would reach their destination by noon. Losses were reckoned to be over a million dollars.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Buick reckons it’s already conquesting some BMW buyers. Kyle Stock, The Seattle Times, "Richer Americans are skipping SUVs for station wagons," 7 Jan. 2019 But in 2019, J.Crew has bigger problems than figuring out its brand voice: The company will need to reckon with nearly $2 billion worth of debt. Chavie Lieber, Vox, "A breakdown of this year’s brand winners and losers.," 27 Dec. 2018 Her position at the esteemed agency The Society Management has given her the unique position to advocate for the many young women in the fashion industry—an industry still reckoning with the hard truths around the exploitation of models. Michaela Bechler, Vogue, "Shop Fall Fashion Inspired by 14 Real Working Women," 20 Sep. 2018 Most of those probably reached Libya via Agadez, crossing Niger at a rate of about 100,000 a year on average since 2000, reckon researchers at the Clingendael Netherlands Institute of International Relations. The Economist, "On the edge of the Sahara, people mourn the decline of people-smuggling," 5 July 2018 Wings in motion and eyes bright, this is a bird to be reckoned with. Joy Wallace Dickinson, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Lake Eola swans had mighty fierce forefather," 24 June 2018 At 64, Sotomayor’s far-reaching inspiration and extensive work, both on the Supreme Court and earlier in her career, have made her a force to be reckoned with. Marilyn La Jeunesse, Teen Vogue, "Sonia Sotomayor's Tenure as a Supreme Court Justice Makes Latinx Law Students Hopeful for the Future," 12 Oct. 2018 Since Fixer Upper began, Chip and Jo have opened a bakery, a restaurant, and Joanna has penned a cookbook, making them a force to be reckoned with in the food world, as well as the design realm. 25. Rebecca Shinners, Country Living, "25 Things You Didn't Know About Chip and Joanna Gaines," 22 Aug. 2018 The largest progressive idea, a federal jobs guarantee, is not ready to become law today and will have to reckon with the increasingly problematic budget outlook. Jason Furman, WSJ, "Work Requirements Hurt Poor Families—and Won’t Work," 2 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reckon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reckon

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for reckon

Middle English rekenen, from Old English -recenian (as in gerecenian to narrate); akin to Old English reccan

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Statistics for reckon

Last Updated

19 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for reckon

The first known use of reckon was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for reckon

reckon

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reckon

: to think or suppose (something) : to believe that (something) is true or possible

: to calculate or guess (an amount, number, value, etc.) : to have or form a general idea about (something)

: to think of (someone or something) as being something specified

reckon

verb
reck·​on | \ ˈre-kən \
reckoned; reckoning

Kids Definition of reckon

1 : to believe that something is true or possible I reckon we're lost.
2 : calculate sense 1 They reckon the distance to be a mile.
3 : to regard or think of as : consider She was reckoned among the leaders.

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More from Merriam-Webster on reckon

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with reckon

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for reckon

Spanish Central: Translation of reckon

Nglish: Translation of reckon for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of reckon for Arabic Speakers

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