pace

noun
\ ˈpās How to pronounce pace (audio) \

Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : rate of movement the runner's pace especially : an established rate of locomotion
b : rate of progress specifically : parallel rate of growth or development supplies kept pace with demand
c : an example to be emulated specifically : first place in a competition three strokes off the pace Time
d(1) : rate of performance or delivery : tempo a steady pace on pace to set a record especially : speed serves with great pace a pace bowler in cricket
(2) : rhythmic animation : fluency writes with color, with zest, and with pace— Amy Loveman
2 : a manner of walking : tread … walked slowly, with even, unhesitating pace— Willa Cather
b : any of various units of distance based on the length of a human step
4a paces plural : an exhibition or test of skills or capacities the trainer put the tiger through its paces
b : gait especially : a fast 2-beat gait (as of the horse) in which the legs move in lateral pairs and support the animal alternately on the right and left legs

pace

verb
paced; pacing

Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

1a : to walk with often slow or measured tread
b : to move along : proceed
2 : to go at a pace used especially of a horse

transitive verb

1a : to measure by pacing often used with off paced off a 10-yard penalty
b : to cover at a walk could hear him pacing the floor
2 : to cover (a course) by pacing used of a horse
3a : to set or regulate the pace of taught them how to pace their solos for … impact— Richard Goldstein also : to establish a moderate or steady pace for (oneself)
b(1) : to go before : precede
(2) : to set an example for : lead
c : to keep pace with
pa·​ce | \ ˈpā-(ˌ)sē How to pronounce pace (audio) ; ˈpä-(ˌ)chā, -(ˌ)kā How to pronounce pace (audio) \

Definition of pace (Entry 3 of 3)

: contrary to the opinion of usually used as an expression of deference to someone's contrary opinion Easiness is a virtue in grammar, pace old-fashioned grammarians …— Philip Howard usually italics

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Synonyms for pace

Synonyms: Verb

file, march, parade, stride

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Did You Know?

Preposition

Though used in English for nearly 150 years, the preposition pace has yet to shed its Latin mantle, and for that reason it's most at home in formal writing or in contexts in which one is playing at formality. The Latin word pace is a form of pax, meaning "peace" or "permission," and when used sincerely the word does indeed suggest a desire for both. This Latin borrowing is unrelated to the more common noun pace (as in "keeping pace") and its related verb ("pacing the room"); these also come from Latin, but from the word pandere, meaning "to spread."

Examples of pace in a Sentence

Noun

We walked at a leisurely pace along the shore. The pace of the story was slow. His new album is selling at a blistering pace.

Verb

When she gets nervous she paces back and forth. He was pacing and muttering to himself. She paced the other runners for the first half of the race. Advertisements are paced so that they are shown more often during peak sales seasons.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

What's more, the Pentagon's glacial pace is no way to meet quickly emerging threats from Russia and China. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "Disrupting the Pentagon: Can the Air Force Learn To Love Startup Culture?," 12 Apr. 2019 Its free-to-play nature, combined with developer Epic Games’ breakneck update pace, allowed the game to flourish, constantly changing in ways both obvious and unexpected. Andrew Webster, The Verge, "The year in Fortnite," 18 Dec. 2018 Nine minutes per passage on English is not such a hard pace. Hafeez Lakhani, Seventeen, "Here's Exactly How To Slay the SAT and ACT," 22 July 2018 Single-family housing starts are running 2.3 percent below last year’s pace. Josh Boak, The Seattle Times, "US housing starts slumped 8.7 percent in February," 26 Mar. 2019 Located 93 miles outside of Tokyo, the house was designed as a serene forest retreat from the city’s fast pace. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Modern Japanese house in the woods looks like fallen leaves," 14 Dec. 2018 That’s the biggest sales increase in high-end homes since January 2014 and more than twice this January’s pace. Jaclyn Gallucci, Fortune, "This Is the New Entry Point for American Luxury-Home Buyers," 12 July 2018 The retailer has spent millions to expand online operations, but investments aimed at keeping pace with changes in the way people shop are undermining profits at the largest U.S supermarket chain, the WSJ’s Heather Haddon reports. Jennifer Smith, WSJ, "Today’s Logistics Report: Shrinking Japan’s Fleet; Squeezing the Grocers; Highway Dividing Lines," 8 Mar. 2019 Adaptive cruise control, which lets the car keep pace automatically with the car in front of it on highways, is another system that uses these types of sensors. Matthew Jancer, Popular Mechanics, "Your Next Car Could Have Airbags That Inflate on the Outside," 15 Feb. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Veteran director Michael Arabian approaches his material with his typical assurance in a well-paced, well-acted staging. F. Kathleen Foley, latimes.com, "Armenian genocide fuels Rogue Machine's '100 Aprils'," 22 June 2018 The staff is good at pacing the dishes and changing out plates as needed. Michael Bauer, San Francisco Chronicle, "Gran Electrica in Napa: Mexican cuisine straight outta Brooklyn," 31 May 2018 Unfortunately, despite the filmmakers’ clear, creative effort to structure their tale dynamically, the constraints of keeping this true story truthful ultimately make effective pacing a near impossible challenge. Tom Russo, BostonGlobe.com, "‘Adrift’ stays on course, but it’s slow-going," 30 May 2018 Leal began pacing the home, grabbed a gun with a laser on top and started waving it around, the affidavit said. David Harris, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Argument over money, lack of job led to son shooting mother near Windermere, affidavit says," 25 June 2018 Alexis Watkins recorded two doubles, a homer and five RBIs to pace the offense. Mike Owens, Philly.com, "Neshaminy, Bristol to play Monday in state softball semifinals," 9 June 2018 Brandon Hicks had 24 kills on .618 hitting to pace the Sea Kings (31-4). Andrew Turner, latimes.com, "CdM boys’ volleyball repeats as champions, ends Newport Harbor’s undefeated season," 20 May 2018 Sarah Fisher drove in two to pace the Comets (39-3), who play at 1:30 p.m. Friday in a winners-bracket game. John Maffei, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Palomar College wins opener in softball state championship," 17 May 2018 One of the last scenes of the film shows former lovers, now zombies, pacing back and forth past each other, obliviously emotionless as their dead hands brush against each other. Noah Berlatsky, The Verge, "Why zombies are so hilarious," 5 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pace

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

circa 1522, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Preposition

1863, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for pace

Noun and Verb

Middle English pas, from Anglo-French, stride, step, from Latin passus, from pandere to spread — more at fathom

Preposition

Latin, ablative of pac-, pax peace, permission — more at pact

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Statistics for pace

Last Updated

18 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pace

The first known use of pace was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for pace

pace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the speed at which someone or something moves
: the speed at which something happens
: a single step or the length of a single step

pace

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 2)

: to walk back and forth across the same space again and again especially because you are nervous
: to control or set the speed of (someone or something)

pace

noun
\ ˈpās How to pronounce pace (audio) \

Kids Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the speed of moving forward or ahead
2 : the speed at which something is done or happens The pace of production needs to increase.
3 : a horse's gait in which the legs on the same side move at the same time
4 : a single step or its length

pace

verb
paced; pacing

Kids Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to walk back and forth across The nervous man began pacing the floor.
2 : to walk with slow steps
3 : to measure by steps We paced off the length of the garden.
4 : to set or regulate the speed at which something is done or happens You have to pace yourself when exercising.

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More from Merriam-Webster on pace

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with pace

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pace

Spanish Central: Translation of pace

Nglish: Translation of pace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pace for Arabic Speakers

Comments on pace

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