pace

noun
\ ˈpās \

Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : rate of movement the runner's pace especially : an established rate of locomotion
b : rate of progress specifically : parallel rate of growth or development supplies kept pace with demand
c : an example to be emulated specifically : first place in a competition three strokes off the pace Time
d(1) : rate of performance or delivery : tempo a steady pace on pace to set a record especially : speed serves with great pace a pace bowler in cricket
(2) : rhythmic animation : fluency writes with color, with zest, and with pace— Amy Loveman
2 : a manner of walking : tread … walked slowly, with even, unhesitating pace— Willa Cather
b : any of various units of distance based on the length of a human step
4a paces plural : an exhibition or test of skills or capacities the trainer put the tiger through its paces
b : gait especially : a fast 2-beat gait (as of the horse) in which the legs move in lateral pairs and support the animal alternately on the right and left legs

pace

verb
paced; pacing

Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

1a : to walk with often slow or measured tread
b : to move along : proceed
2 : to go at a pace used especially of a horse

transitive verb

1a : to measure by pacing often used with off paced off a 10-yard penalty
b : to cover at a walk could hear him pacing the floor
2 : to cover (a course) by pacing used of a horse
3a : to set or regulate the pace of taught them how to pace their solos for … impact— Richard Goldstein also : to establish a moderate or steady pace for (oneself)
b(1) : to go before : precede
(2) : to set an example for : lead
c : to keep pace with
pa·​ce | \ ˈpā-(ˌ)sē; ˈpä-(ˌ)chā, -(ˌ)kā \

Definition of pace (Entry 3 of 3)

: contrary to the opinion of usually used as an expression of deference to someone's contrary opinion Easiness is a virtue in grammar, pace old-fashioned grammarians …— Philip Howard usually italics

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Synonyms for pace

Synonyms: Verb

file, march, parade, stride

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Preposition

Though used in English for nearly 150 years, the preposition pace has yet to shed its Latin mantle, and for that reason it's most at home in formal writing or in contexts in which one is playing at formality. The Latin word pace is a form of pax, meaning "peace" or "permission," and when used sincerely the word does indeed suggest a desire for both. This Latin borrowing is unrelated to the more common noun pace (as in "keeping pace") and its related verb ("pacing the room"); these also come from Latin, but from the word pandere, meaning "to spread."

Examples of pace in a Sentence

Noun

We walked at a leisurely pace along the shore. The pace of the story was slow. His new album is selling at a blistering pace.

Verb

When she gets nervous she paces back and forth. He was pacing and muttering to himself. She paced the other runners for the first half of the race. Advertisements are paced so that they are shown more often during peak sales seasons.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But one reason Apple and Qualcomm have conflicting interpretations of the ruling seems to be the slow pace of the legal process. Timothy B. Lee, Ars Technica, "Qualcomm says a Chinese court has banned sales of older iPhones nationwide," 10 Dec. 2018 But all the origin stories also are meant to slow down the pace of discovery on board the Origin. Samantha Nelson, The Verge, "YouTube’s tech-noir series Origin is Lost… in space," 14 Nov. 2018 Despite the hectic pace of her current life, Baldwin seems to have found a satisfactory rhythm. Zoey Grossman; Fashion Editor: Miguel Enamorado, Harper's BAZAAR, "Hailey Baldwin Gets Candid About Fashion, Family, and Life In the Spotlight," 16 Oct. 2018 This week’s Taurus Waning Moon slows the pace, and asks us to trust that our powerful presence is enough to move the mountains that need shifting. Bess Matassa, Teen Vogue, "Weekly Horoscopes July 30-Aug 5," 27 July 2018 The increasing pace of wind turbine installations reduced overall costs as manufacturers perfected their methods through trial and error in the growing industry. L.m. Sixel, Houston Chronicle, "Cost to generate wind power fell by one-third in six years," 13 July 2018 Analysts estimate sales grew by the fastest pace in almost seven years. Tom Hudson, miamiherald, "Earnings energy taxed by tariffs," 5 July 2018 The queen is still coming down from the all-consuming pace of Drag Race, throwing herself fully into the demands of press and tour planning. Yohana Desta, HWD, "RuPaul’s Drag Race Winner Aquaria Knows Exactly How to Address Racism in the Show’s Fandom," 29 June 2018 The Queen reportedly went at a stately pace (only fitting of course), while Prince Edward was galloping around the grounds, according to the Daily Mail. Elizabeth Angell, Town & Country, "Prince Edward and Queen Elizabeth Went for a Mother-Son Ride Around Windsor This Weekend," 19 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Alibaba’s 5% gain is pacing its best monthly performance since May. Xiaomi is up 19% in November. Steven Russolillo, WSJ, "After a Dismal Year, China Tech Stocks Perk Up," 23 Nov. 2018 Earlier in the evening, Macron had paced nervously and then leaped euphorically from his seat in the VIP section as a guest of FIFA and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Graham Dunbar, Fox News, "French President Macron has plenty of fun at World Cup final," 15 July 2018 The movie is fast-paced and forward-thinking, overflowing with looks that flash by. Rachel Nussbaum, Glamour, "The Hidden Message in Tessa Thompson's Sorry to Bother You Makeup," 1 Aug. 2018 Her style mirrors life online: fast-paced and disembodied. Maddie Crum, The Seattle Times, "What is a woman’s body worth in America?," 25 June 2018 During Crow’s well-paced and energetic hour-long show, the nine-time Grammy winner gifted baby-boomer and younger fans with her classic hits. Gail Mitchell, Billboard, "James Taylor & Sheryl Crow Take Over the Hollywood Bowl: Most Memorable Moments," 1 June 2018 The game had a similar feel - fast paced and well played - to Silsbee's regional final against Yates, which finished 120-103. Danny Shapiro, Houston Chronicle, "Silsbee defeats Dallas Carter, claims second consecutive 4A state title," 10 Mar. 2018 His security was pacing him in a pair of black Suburbans, going slow in the fast lane, or slipping in and out of adjacent parking lots. Jon Caramanica, New York Times, "Into the Wild With Kanye West," 25 June 2018 After winning both his 2017 races, Vino Rosso finished third in a fast-paced, Grade 3 Sam Davis Stakes and fourth in the Grade 2 South Tampa Bay Derby before getting the Wood. Mark Inabinett, AL.com, "Kentucky Derby 2018: Meet the contenders and watch them run," 30 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pace

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

circa 1522, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Preposition

1863, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for pace

Noun and Verb

Middle English pas, from Anglo-French, stride, step, from Latin passus, from pandere to spread — more at fathom

Preposition

Latin, ablative of pac-, pax peace, permission — more at pact

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Statistics for pace

Last Updated

10 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for pace

The first known use of pace was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for pace

pace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the speed at which someone or something moves

: the speed at which something happens

: a single step or the length of a single step

pace

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 2)

: to walk back and forth across the same space again and again especially because you are nervous

: to control or set the speed of (someone or something)

pace

noun
\ ˈpās \

Kids Definition of pace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the speed of moving forward or ahead
2 : the speed at which something is done or happens The pace of production needs to increase.
3 : a horse's gait in which the legs on the same side move at the same time
4 : a single step or its length

pace

verb
paced; pacing

Kids Definition of pace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to walk back and forth across The nervous man began pacing the floor.
2 : to walk with slow steps
3 : to measure by steps We paced off the length of the garden.
4 : to set or regulate the speed at which something is done or happens You have to pace yourself when exercising.

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More from Merriam-Webster on pace

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with pace

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pace

Spanish Central: Translation of pace

Nglish: Translation of pace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pace for Arabic Speakers

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