stride

verb
\ˈstrīd \
strode\ˈstrōd \; stridden\ˈstri-​dᵊn \; striding\ˈstrī-​diŋ \

Definition of stride 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to stand astride

2 : to move with or as if with long steps strode across the room

3 : to take a very long step

transitive verb

2 : to step over

3 : to move over or along with or as if with long measured steps striding the boardwalk

stride

noun

Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a cycle of locomotor movements (as of a horse) completed when the feet regain the initial relative positions also : the distance traversed in a stride

b : the most effective natural pace : maximum competence or capability often used in the phrase hit one's stride

2 : a long step

3 : an act of striding

4 : a stage of progress : advance made great strides toward their goal

5 : a manner of striding

in stride

1 : without interference with regular activities

2 : without emotional reaction took the news in stride

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Other Words from stride

Verb

strider \ˈstrī-​dər \ noun

Synonyms for stride

Synonyms: Verb

file, march, pace, parade

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Examples of stride in a Sentence

Verb

She strode across the room towards me. a gang of armed men strode into the bank and approached the teller

Noun

She crossed the room in only a few strides. He was standing only a few strides away from me. He has a distinctive bouncy stride. She entered the room with a confident stride.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

R3hab, real name Fadil El Ghoul, strides into The Verge with a bubbling energy that ekes into every corner. Dani Deahl, The Verge, "What’s In Your Bag, R3hab?," 5 Oct. 2018 The Swiss will play the gold medal game on Sunday against defending champion Sweden, which strode into the final by crushing the United States 6-0. Karel Janicek, chicagotribune.com, "Sweden crushes U.S. 6-0 to reach final of hockey worlds; Swiss stun Canada," 19 May 2018 Partway through her closing argument on Tuesday, Kristen Gibbons Feden, a 35-year-old prosecutor, strode across the courtroom and stared down Bill Cosby from a few feet away. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: The Intercept breaks open Democratic squabbles as midterm elections approach," 30 Apr. 2018 Big Freedia strode onto the Congo Square stage at Jazz Fest Saturday (April 28) afternoon in a glittering golden T-shirt, a necklace befitting Nefertiti, black denim shorts split alluringly up the thigh, and glitter shoes. Doug Maccash, NOLA.com, "Big Freedia conducts a church choir at Jazz Fest 2018," 28 Apr. 2018 Flynn strode in and walked back out without any comment. NBC News, "Michael Flynn pushes for faster sentencing in Russia probe," 10 July 2018 Partway through her closing argument on Tuesday, Kristen Gibbons Feden, a 35-year-old prosecutor, strode across the courtroom and stared down Bill Cosby from a few feet away. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: The Intercept breaks open Democratic squabbles as midterm elections approach," 30 Apr. 2018 Partway through her closing argument on Tuesday, Kristen Gibbons Feden, a 35-year-old prosecutor, strode across the courtroom and stared down Bill Cosby from a few feet away. Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times, "The Prosecutor Who Stared Down Bill Cosby," 29 Apr. 2018 Then, with instructions from Boone, Austin Romine laid down a sacrifice bunt that pushed Wade to second as Gardner strode to the plate. David Waldstein, New York Times, "The Yankees Went to Extra Innings, but Still Knocked Off Early," 8 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Microsoft has struggled to keep its Edge rendering engine in stride with Chromium. Tom Warren, The Verge, "Microsoft is rebuilding its Edge browser on Chrome and bringing it to the Mac," 6 Dec. 2018 The talks come after major strides from North Korea in its nuclear capability, including tests of more powerful weapons and missiles that can reach the United States. NBC News, "North Korea's many nuclear weapons and how to rid the world of them," 11 June 2018 While Apple has been making impressive strides with the Apple Watch and even Samsung has turned its Gear lineup into competent smartwatches, Wear OS has languished with slow software updates and next to zero hardware advancements. Stefan Etienne, The Verge, "Fossil Sport Smartwatch review: new watch, same old tricks," 20 Nov. 2018 The budding democracy, also coping with extremist attacks, is having trouble overcoming political problems despite major strides since autocratic leader Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in 2011. Bouazza Ben Bouazza, The Seattle Times, "Tunisia PM faces confidence vote amid political tensions," 12 Nov. 2018 The new show is very similar, but the world has made great strides and changes and the show has adapted. Lucia Tonelli, ELLE Decor, "The Original 'Queer Eye' Stars Reunite For TV's Most Stylish Home Makeover Show," 19 Oct. 2018 And, while both often use harmful chemicals in their processes, the industry is slowly making strides to be more sustainable for both animals and the environment. Alyssa Hardy, Teen Vogue, "Best Vegan Leather Jackets, Boots, and Pieces You Need this Winter," 17 Oct. 2018 The reality is that the Magic’s youngsters — especially Bamba and Isaac — must make some strides this summer, and the new coaching staff must build productive working relationships with the players. Josh Robbins, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Five takeaways from the Magic’s summer league opener," 7 July 2018 If South Carolina’s offense makes strides under McClendon’s leadership though, Snell will need more help from the passing game. Jon Hale, The Courier-Journal, "How Kentucky football can win (or lose) against South Carolina," 6 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stride

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for stride

Verb

Middle English, from Old English strīdan; akin to Middle Low German striden to straddle, Old High German strītan to quarrel

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Statistics for stride

Last Updated

17 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stride

The first known use of stride was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for stride

stride

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk with very long steps

stride

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long step

: the distance covered by a long step

: a way of walking

stride

verb
\ˈstrīd \
strode\ˈstrōd \; stridden\ˈstri-​dᵊn \; striding\ˈstrī-​diŋ \

Kids Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk or run with long even steps

stride

noun

Kids Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a long step or the distance covered by such a step She crossed the room in only a few strides.

2 : a step forward : advance We've made great strides toward a cure.

3 : a way of walking a bouncy stride

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More from Merriam-Webster on stride

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stride

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stride

Spanish Central: Translation of stride

Nglish: Translation of stride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stride for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about stride

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