stride

verb
\ ˈstrīd How to pronounce stride (audio) \
strode\ ˈstrōd How to pronounce strode (audio) \; stridden\ ˈstri-​dᵊn How to pronounce stridden (audio) \; striding\ ˈstrī-​diŋ How to pronounce striding (audio) \

Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to stand astride
2 : to move with or as if with long steps strode across the room
3 : to take a very long step

transitive verb

2 : to step over
3 : to move over or along with or as if with long measured steps striding the boardwalk

stride

noun

Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a cycle of locomotor movements (as of a horse) completed when the feet regain the initial relative positions also : the distance traversed in a stride
b : the most effective natural pace : maximum competence or capability often used in the phrase hit one's stride
2 : a long step
3 : an act of striding
4 : a stage of progress : advance made great strides toward their goal
5 : a manner of striding
in stride
1 : without interference with regular activities
2 : without emotional reaction took the news in stride

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Other Words from stride

Verb

strider \ ˈstrī-​dər How to pronounce strider (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for stride

Synonyms: Verb

file, march, pace, parade

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Examples of stride in a Sentence

Verb

She strode across the room towards me. a gang of armed men strode into the bank and approached the teller

Noun

She crossed the room in only a few strides. He was standing only a few strides away from me. He has a distinctive bouncy stride. She entered the room with a confident stride.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Rebels assistant coach Damon Jones hollered, striding onto the floor. Lee Jenkins, SI.com, "How Damian Lillard Redefined the Meaning of 'Dame Time'," 5 Apr. 2018 Frédéric Malle’s luxe citric magnolia-scented balm soothes skin after a day spent in the sun, while Dior’s shimmering clementine-and-lemon nail lacquers promise that the lady of the house will stride into fall on a bright note. Zoe Ruffner, Vogue, "10 Labor Day Weekend Beauty Gifts That Capitalize on Chic," 28 Aug. 2018 In movies, the Spider-Man franchise has for far too long focused on the same character doing the same things, often in the exact same way, no matter what strides the comic made in terms of diversity and representation. Bryan Bishop, The Verge, "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is dazzling, hilarious, and unique," 14 Dec. 2018 The background to the first Obama-Netanyahu White House encounter unfolds almost like a thriller, with each side confidently striding toward a precipice. Noga Tarnopolsky, latimes.com, "'Bibi' is a major biography of Benjamin Netanyahu. Anshel Pfeffer gets to the Israeli leader's core.," 27 Apr. 2018 Franco, hands high and feet square to the plate, strode slight toward first base and smacked 10 balls off the tee over where the second baseman would stand. Marcus Hayes, Philly.com, "Maikel Franco and his new swing are crucial for Phillies | Marcus Hayes," 15 Mar. 2018 For her grand entrance, Michelle strode on stage in a silky Balenciaga dress from the spring/summer 2019 collection. Marina Liao, Marie Claire, "Michelle Obama Wore a Pair of Glittery Balenciaga Boots for the Last Stop on Her 'Becoming' Tour," 20 Dec. 2018 If the likes of Allyson Felix, Felix Sanchez, Quincy Watts and Don Quarrie represent the glamorous history of Trojans track and field, the smooth-striding Norman symbolizes the program's future. Dylan Hernandez, latimes.com, "USC's Michael Norman Jr. has Olympic dreams and world record aspirations," 20 Apr. 2018 From the moment the first Dior models strode down the runway in 1953 sporting crimson pouts, the house’s iconic shade has been in high demand, and is now sold three times every hour in the U.S. Jenna Rennert, Vogue, "The 13 Best Selling Red Lipsticks of All Time," 24 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

There will be peaks and valleys as Osaka learns to take her experiences in stride. Louisa Thomas, Vogue, "The New Number One: Naomi Osaka Is Playing to Win," 21 Mar. 2019 The American people have largely taken the disruptive Trump Presidency in stride, going about their lives and expressing their approval or not the constitutional way—at the ballot box. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "The FBI’s Trump Panic," 18 Feb. 2019 Many journalists with robust Twitter pages saw their followings reduced, although some took it in stride. Julia Jacobs, New York Times, "In Twitter Purge, Top Accounts Lose Millions of Followers," 12 July 2018 And only heightened by the fact that STD rates are at an all-time high, there's no doubt that opening up the biological treatment to a wider range of women is a major stride for a health concern that's approaching epidemic proportions. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "The HPV Vaccine is Now Available to Women Over 27—Here’s Why It’s Great News for You," 8 Oct. 2018 The features are indistinct, but what is there — a fedora, a striped tie, a certain barrel shape to the belly, a familiar stride — is enough to unnerve me. John Kelly, Washington Post, "An unnerving Father’s Day gift has left me pondering portraiture — and the soul," 18 June 2018 The growth nationwide has been steady, but no market has taken a longer stride in the past eight years than Kansas City, home to a franchise that Garber calls a trend-setter for the rest of the league. Sam Mcdowell, kansascity, "How a World Cup would benefit Sporting KC. Let us count the ways," 15 June 2018 Both like to be near the front of races early and display a stride that appears effortless. Jason Frakes, The Courier-Journal, "In Triple Crown race, Justify's toughest foe could be American Pharoah," 8 June 2018 At the bell lap, Okedi led by a stride before bursting to a much larger cushion in her final collegiate outdoor race. Andrew Greif, OregonLive.com, "Kansas' Sharon Lokedi smashes NCAA 10,000 meet record to upset form chart," 7 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stride

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for stride

Verb

Middle English, from Old English strīdan; akin to Middle Low German striden to straddle, Old High German strītan to quarrel

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More Definitions for stride

stride

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk with very long steps

stride

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long step
: the distance covered by a long step
: a way of walking

stride

verb
\ ˈstrīd How to pronounce stride (audio) \
strode\ ˈstrōd \; stridden\ ˈstri-​dᵊn \; striding\ ˈstrī-​diŋ \

Kids Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk or run with long even steps

stride

noun

Kids Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a long step or the distance covered by such a step She crossed the room in only a few strides.
2 : a step forward : advance We've made great strides toward a cure.
3 : a way of walking a bouncy stride

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More from Merriam-Webster on stride

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stride

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stride

Spanish Central: Translation of stride

Nglish: Translation of stride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stride for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about stride

Comments on stride

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