stride

verb
\ˈstrīd \
strode\ˈstrōd \; stridden\ˈstri-dᵊn \; striding\ˈstrī-diŋ \

Definition of stride 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to stand astride

2 : to move with or as if with long steps strode across the room

3 : to take a very long step

transitive verb

2 : to step over

3 : to move over or along with or as if with long measured steps striding the boardwalk

stride

noun

Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a cycle of locomotor movements (as of a horse) completed when the feet regain the initial relative positions also : the distance traversed in a stride

b : the most effective natural pace : maximum competence or capability often used in the phrase hit one's stride

2 : a long step

3 : an act of striding

4 : a stage of progress : advance made great strides toward their goal

5 : a manner of striding

in stride

1 : without interference with regular activities

2 : without emotional reaction took the news in stride

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Other Words from stride

Verb

strider \ˈstrī-dər \ noun

Synonyms for stride

Synonyms: Verb

file, march, pace, parade

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Examples of stride in a Sentence

Verb

She strode across the room towards me. a gang of armed men strode into the bank and approached the teller

Noun

She crossed the room in only a few strides. He was standing only a few strides away from me. He has a distinctive bouncy stride. She entered the room with a confident stride.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Flynn strode in and walked back out without any comment. NBC News, "Michael Flynn pushes for faster sentencing in Russia probe," 10 July 2018 Partway through her closing argument on Tuesday, Kristen Gibbons Feden, a 35-year-old prosecutor, strode across the courtroom and stared down Bill Cosby from a few feet away. James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: The Intercept breaks open Democratic squabbles as midterm elections approach," 30 Apr. 2018 Partway through her closing argument on Tuesday, Kristen Gibbons Feden, a 35-year-old prosecutor, strode across the courtroom and stared down Bill Cosby from a few feet away. Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times, "The Prosecutor Who Stared Down Bill Cosby," 29 Apr. 2018 Then, with instructions from Boone, Austin Romine laid down a sacrifice bunt that pushed Wade to second as Gardner strode to the plate. David Waldstein, New York Times, "The Yankees Went to Extra Innings, but Still Knocked Off Early," 8 July 2018 Paul Pogba striding forward, Antoine Griezmann dancing through challenges. Rory Smith, New York Times, "France, With Flash to Spare, Reaches the World Cup Final," 11 July 2018 In keeping with the tradition of the defending champions christening Centre Court, Roger Federer strode out for his first match wearing... Jon Wertheim, SI.com, "Five Thoughts From Day One of Wimbledon," 2 July 2018 In the most memorable or at least marketing-friendly scene, an assassin strides up to his target on a major Mexico City street, cavalierly removes his mask and opens fire. Justin Chang, latimes.com, "Violent, self-admiring sequel 'Sicario: Day of the Soldado' gets lost in the desert," 26 June 2018 As a putter, Ray strode the Mendoza Line with stunning consistency. Paul Daugherty, Cincinnati.com, "TML: A stern talk with Ray Cook ... my golf putter," 19 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

That does not account for the length of a pitcher’s stride, or the deception pitchers employ with their delivery, or the fact that 37 pitchers in 2016 averaged more than 95 miles per hour with their fastballs. Zach Schonbrun, New York Times, "How Do Athletes’ Brains Control Their Movements?," 13 Apr. 2018 Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge After a few episodes where the show had made some positive strides, last week The Walking Dead returned to some of its worst tendencies. Nick Statt, The Verge, "The Walking Dead Villain Watch season 8, episode 14: Still Gotta Mean Something," 2 Apr. 2018 The company has made some concrete strides, and has promised to double its safety and security team to 20,000 people this year. Issie Lapowsky, WIRED, "Facebook's Election Safeguards Are Still a Work in Progress," 29 Mar. 2018 But Guthrie seemed to take it in stride, and good humor. Megan Friedman, Country Living, "Savannah Guthrie Apologizes for Swearing on Live Television," 29 Mar. 2018 In addition to his strides on offense, Dawson has improved dramatically on defense. Michael Osipoff, Post-Tribune, "Andrean graduate Chase Dawson beefs up production at plate as VU's second baseman," 20 Mar. 2018 Meghan Markle has quickly found her beauty stride since officially becoming the Duchess of Sussex. Christian Allaire, Vogue, "Only Meghan Markle Could Make a Preppy-Chic Beauty Trend Look This Good at Wimbledon," 14 July 2018 In the last three years, the movement toward inclusivity in the industry has made strides to include curve models like Ashley Graham, Paloma Elsesser, and Barbie Ferreira. Alyssa Hardy, Teen Vogue, "There Was Only One Plus Size Model During Men's Fashion Week," 13 July 2018 The to-do list in a return to Triple-A El Paso included continued work on his defense, shortening both a high leg kick and long stride and generally slowing down his overall approach. Jeff Sanders, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Padres' Franmil Reyes savoring teachable moments," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stride

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for stride

Verb

Middle English, from Old English strīdan; akin to Middle Low German striden to straddle, Old High German strītan to quarrel

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Statistics for stride

Last Updated

22 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stride

The first known use of stride was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for stride

stride

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk with very long steps

stride

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long step

: the distance covered by a long step

: a way of walking

stride

verb
\ˈstrīd \
strode\ˈstrōd \; stridden\ˈstri-dᵊn \; striding\ˈstrī-diŋ \

Kids Definition of stride

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to walk or run with long even steps

stride

noun

Kids Definition of stride (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a long step or the distance covered by such a step She crossed the room in only a few strides.

2 : a step forward : advance We've made great strides toward a cure.

3 : a way of walking a bouncy stride

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Comments on stride

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