bride

noun
\ ˈbrīd How to pronounce bride (audio) \

Definition of bride

: a woman just married or about to be married

Examples of bride in a Sentence

the mother of the bride
Recent Examples on the Web Only the bride's parents were able to be present, the couple having quarantined with them from the start. Kelly Lawler, USA TODAY, "Staying Apart, Together: Why a Zoom wedding can be just as good as a regular wedding," 8 July 2020 His fifth white look featured a face covering fit for the modern bride who wants to take COVID-19 safety precautions: a silk chiffon headpiece with cutouts around the eyes. Eliza Huber, refinery29.com, "Bridal Masks & Taffeta Bows Reign Supreme At Giambattista Valli," 7 July 2020 The bride carried white lace-cap hydrangeas, mini carnations, ranunculus and peonies. oregonlive, "It’s American Flowers Week and you’re invited to celebrate the blooming fun," 24 June 2020 Just because a wedding isn't taking place in a traditional setting doesn't mean the bride and groom should abandon wedding traditions that are important to them. Matt Villano, CNN, "Virtual weddings done right by couples undeterred by the pandemic," 22 June 2020 His routine is only shaken when Sarah (Cristin Milioti)—the sister of the bride—hooks up with Nyles and unwittingly follows him right into a mysterious cave, resigning her to his same fate. Emily Tannenbaum, Glamour, "Palm Springs Is the Perfect Vacation From Your Infinite Quarantine Time Loop," 10 July 2020 Here comes the bride … at Cleveland Municipal Court once again. Hannah Drown, cleveland, "See second wedding ceremony held since coronavirus pandemic inside Cleveland Municipal courtroom (photos, video)," 10 July 2020 Peter Gallagher is also funny as the father of Sarah (and the bride). Bill Goodykoontz, The Arizona Republic, "Why Andy Samberg's new Hulu comedy 'Palm Springs' is perfect for pandemic viewing," 8 July 2020 Several lifeguards leaped into the water to rescue the bride and groom, ABC 7 reported. Fox News, "California bride, groom rescued after giant wave sweeps them into ocean during wedding photos," 3 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bride.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bride

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for bride

Middle English, from Old English brȳd; akin to Old High German brūt bride

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Time Traveler for bride

Time Traveler

The first known use of bride was before the 12th century

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Statistics for bride

Last Updated

27 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Bride.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bride. Accessed 6 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for bride

bride

noun
How to pronounce bride (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bride

: a woman who has just married or is about to be married

bride

noun
\ ˈbrīd How to pronounce bride (audio) \

Kids Definition of bride

: a woman just married or about to be married

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More from Merriam-Webster on bride

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bride

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bride

Spanish Central: Translation of bride

Nglish: Translation of bride for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bride for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about bride

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