precede

verb
pre·​cede | \ pri-ˈsēd How to pronounce precede (audio) \
preceded; preceding

Definition of precede

transitive verb

1 : to surpass in rank, dignity, or importance
2 : to be, go, or come ahead or in front of
3 : to be earlier than
4 : to cause to be preceded : preface

intransitive verb

: to go or come before

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Synonyms & Antonyms for precede

Synonyms

antecede, antedate, forego, predate, preexist

Antonyms

follow, postdate, succeed

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Examples of precede in a Sentence

Minutes before 10:30 p.m. in China, the stadium pulsed with the emotions that always precede a 100-meter final. — Tim Layden, Sports Illustrated, 25 Aug. 2008 But research has now shown that so-called responses to rhythm actually precede the external beat. We anticipate the beat … — Oliver Sacks, Musicophilia, 2007 The print media ape the manners of television, and on television form precedes content, emotion replaces thought, legend substitutes for history, fiction dictates to fact. — Lewis H. Lapham, Harper's, September 1998 Riots preceded the civil war. She preceded him into the room. The country became more conservative in the years that preceded his election. The new mayor is very different from the person who preceded her in office. The meeting was preceded by a brief welcoming speech. The chairman preceded the meeting with a brief welcoming speech.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The national collapses—1789, 1940—were always preceded by a generation of elite stupidity, cowardice and greed. Pascal-emmanuel Gobry, WSJ, "The Failure of the French Elite," 22 Feb. 2019 The country boasts the highest percentage of women in parliament—67.5 percent—and, according to the World Economic Forum, ranks sixth for its effort to reduce the gender gap (preceded only by four Scandinavian countries and Nicaragua). Caterina Clerici & Eléonore Hamelin, Marie Claire, "Rwanda's Future Is Female," 1 Feb. 2019 The book is primarily a literature review of 300 years of Supreme Court majority rulings on corporate personhood, preceded by a history of pre-Revolutionary War trading company charters. Constance Grady, Vox, "We read all 25 National Book Award finalists for 2018. Here’s what we thought.," 15 Nov. 2018 That’s preceded by a three-week total closure when the old Alaskan Way Viaduct is shut down and the tunnel isn’t open yet. Mike Lindblom, The Seattle Times, "Former Highway 99 tunnel chief named interim Seattle transportation director," 27 Aug. 2018 The preceding sentence doesn't exactly scream success. Tom Daykin, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Milwaukee's Florida Yards sells last lot after three decades — as Harbor District rises," 20 Apr. 2018 Tot Shabbat services precede general Shabbat morning services at 11 a.m. Young children sing along with clergy, hear stories and receive special blessings. Courant Community, "Community News For The West Hartford Edition," 12 June 2018 Given its eerily familiar premise, the film has drawn comparisons to both Netflix's Bird Box and last year’s A Quiet Place, however, Lebbon’s book precedes John Krasinski’s production. Sara Delgado, Teen Vogue, "Kiernan Shipka and her "CAOS" Costar Miranda Otto Teamed Up for New Netflix Thriller "The Silence"," 8 Apr. 2019 This is a discomfiting development since such yield-curve inversions have preceded past recessions. Justin Lahart, WSJ, "What’s Behind Collapsing Bond Yields," 25 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'precede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of precede

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for precede

Middle English, from Middle French preceder, from Latin praecedere, from prae- pre- + cedere to go

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Statistics for precede

Last Updated

6 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for precede

The first known use of precede was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for precede

precede

verb

English Language Learners Definition of precede

somewhat formal
: to happen, go, or come before (something or someone)
: to do or say something before (something)

precede

verb
pre·​cede | \ pri-ˈsēd How to pronounce precede (audio) \
preceded; preceding

Kids Definition of precede

: to be or go before in importance, position, or time Many failures preceded her success.

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More from Merriam-Webster on precede

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with precede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for precede

Spanish Central: Translation of precede

Nglish: Translation of precede for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of precede for Arabic Speakers

Comments on precede

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