concede

verb
con·​cede | \ kən-ˈsēd How to pronounce concede (audio) \
conceded; conceding

Definition of concede

transitive verb

1a(1) : to acknowledge grudgingly or hesitantly conceded that it might be a good idea
(2) : to relinquish grudgingly or hesitantly concede power
b : to accept as true, valid, or accurate The right of the state to tax is generally conceded.
2 : to grant as a right or privilege Britain conceded the independence of the colonies.

Other Words from concede

concededly \ kən-​ˈsē-​dəd-​lē How to pronounce concede (audio) \ adverb
conceder noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for concede

Synonyms

Antonyms

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for concede

grant, concede, vouchsafe, accord, award mean to give as a favor or a right. grant implies giving to a claimant or petitioner something that could be withheld. granted them a new hearing concede implies yielding something reluctantly in response to a rightful or compelling claim. even her critics concede she can be charming vouchsafe implies granting something as a courtesy or an act of gracious condescension. vouchsafed the secret to only a few chosen disciples accord implies giving to another what is due or proper. accorded all the honors befitting a head of state award implies giving what is deserved or merited usually after a careful weighing of pertinent factors. awarded the company a huge defense contract

Politics and Concede

After the votes have been counted, one candidate traditionally concedes the election to his or her opponent by giving a concession speech. If you're lucky, your boss will concede that she was wrong the last time she criticized you. But in the middle of an argument, we're not all so good at conceding that the other guy might have a good point.

Examples of concede in a Sentence

… he conceded that with six kids, something like this was bound to happen. At least one of them had to be a bad egg. — Markus Zusak, The Book Thief, 2005 … it was generally conceded that Caepio, if and when tried for treason under the present system, would be acquitted. — Colleen McCullough, The First Man in Rome, (1990) 1991 … after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate. — Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer, 1876 I concede that the work has been slow so far, but it should speed up soon. “Your plan might work,” she conceded, “but I still think mine is better.” Although it seems clear that he has lost the election, he still refuses to concede. He's not ready to concede the election. The former ruler was forced to concede power to a new government. The company says that workers are not conceding enough in negotiations. See More
Recent Examples on the Web That work eventually led the county district attorney to concede the original conviction could no longer stand. Greg Moran, San Diego Union-Tribune, 13 July 2022 Trump proceeded with his plan despite White House counsel Pat Cipollone, Cabinet officials and other top aides advising him to concede his presidential election loss to Joe Biden, according to witnesses and other evidence presented Tuesday. Candy Woodall, USA TODAY, 12 July 2022 In the days after the election, Thomas urged Meadows not to concede. Amanda Kaufman, BostonGlobe.com, 12 July 2022 Within a day, leading Republicans, like Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, acknowledged Mr. Biden’s victory, and several aides to Mr. Trump, including Pat A. Cipollone, the top lawyer in the White House, advised the president to concede. Luke Broadwater, New York Times, 12 July 2022 Should Shanes concede, Griffin will see yet another primary loss for an Illinois candidate his money went to support this year. Emily Hoerner, Chicago Tribune, 29 June 2022 Prosecutors probably won't concede insanity given the high-profile nature of the case, Adams said. Todd Richmond, ajc, 24 June 2022 Cisneros, however, declined at the time to concede the race. Thomas Phippen, Fox News, 21 June 2022 One dominant political party (in a two-party system, at least) rises as its champion, and, crucially, the opposing party is forced to concede to survive. Ed Burmila, The New Republic, 15 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of concede

1626, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

History and Etymology for concede

French or Latin; French concéder, from Latin concedere, from com- + cedere to yield

Learn More About concede

Time Traveler for concede

Time Traveler

The first known use of concede was in 1626

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near concede

concealment cipher

concede

concede defeat

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for concede

Last Updated

17 Jul 2022

Cite this Entry

“Concede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/concede. Accessed 8 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for concede

concede

verb
con·​cede | \ kən-ˈsēd How to pronounce concede (audio) \
conceded; conceding

Kids Definition of concede

1 : to admit to be true The candidate had to concede defeat.
2 : to grant or yield usually unwillingly Britain conceded the independence of the colonies.

More from Merriam-Webster on concede

Nglish: Translation of concede for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of concede for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Commonly Confused Words Quiz

  • vector image of a face with thought expression
  • I went to the ______ store to buy a birthday card.
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!