admit

1 of 2

verb

ad·​mit əd-ˈmit How to pronounce admit (audio)
ad-
admitted; admitting

transitive verb

1
a
: to allow scope for : permit
admits no possibility of misunderstanding
b
: to concede as true or valid
admitted making a mistake
2
a
: to allow entry (as to a place, fellowship, or privilege)
an open window had admitted rain
admitted to the club
b
: to accept into a hospital as an inpatient
he was admitted last night for chest pains

intransitive verb

1
: to give entrance or access
2
a
: allow, permit
admits of two interpretations
b
: to make acknowledgment
used with to
admitted to having doubts

admit

2 of 2

noun

US
: a person who is admitted into a school, hospital, etc.
When a patient is transferred, the nurse will take the next new admit—unless her patient is transferred to a hospital for only a temporary stay.Sally Seaver
Choose the Right Synonym for admit

acknowledge, admit, own, avow, confess mean to disclose against one's will or inclination.

acknowledge implies the disclosing of something that has been or might be concealed.

acknowledged an earlier peccadillo

admit implies reluctance to disclose, grant, or concede and refers usually to facts rather than their implications.

admitted the project was over budget

own implies acknowledging something in close relation to oneself.

must own I know little about computers

avow implies boldly declaring, often in the face of hostility, what one might be expected to be silent about.

avowed that he was a revolutionary

confess may apply to an admission of a weakness, failure, omission, or guilt.

confessed a weakness for sweets

Examples of admit in a Sentence

Verb You know you're wrong! Admit it! I hate to admit it, but he's right. This ticket admits one person. He admitted them into his office. They refused to admit her to the club. The patient was very sick when she was admitted to the hospital. He was admitted last night for chest pains. The judge decided to admit the evidence. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
The only losses are 83-44 to Harvard-Westlake in the first game of the season, a game Allard admitted his team was not ready to play. John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune, 22 Feb. 2024 However, the Euphoria actress admitted the same could not be said for herself. Kimberlee Speakman, Peoplemag, 22 Feb. 2024 Leaders at Cal-OSHA, and even DIR Director Katie Hagen, admit that the division isn’t hiring quickly enough. Maya Miller, Sacramento Bee, 22 Feb. 2024 For all the talk, fund managers admit that in the financial services industry is only at the beginning of the AI journey. Lawrence Wintermeyer, Forbes, 22 Feb. 2024 More questions were raised when one-time attorney Paul Paradis, who ghost-wrote the lawsuit filed against the city and admitted taking a kickback, told a federal judge in November that an FBI agent testified in two affidavits that Feuer perjured himself before a federal grand jury. Dakota Smith, Los Angeles Times, 22 Feb. 2024 But analyses found that applicants who withheld scores were less likely to be admitted. Susan Svrluga, Washington Post, 22 Feb. 2024 After losing at this year’s Australian Open in January, Murray admitted this could be his final season on tour. Ben Church, CNN, 21 Feb. 2024 In an exclusive conversation with PEOPLE ahead of Friday's premiere of Mama June: Family Crisis, Eldridge admits that he's been unable to watch back his wedding to Anna without getting emotional. Esther Kang, Peoplemag, 10 Feb. 2024
Noun
Colleges normally start receiving applicants’ FAFSA information in October and immediately start calculating aid packages for potential admits. Dylan Sloan, Fortune, 6 Feb. 2024 In fact, schools with low single-digit admit rates could do this many times over. Brennan Barnard, Forbes, 2 June 2022 For now, Democrats appear to be returning to the phone calls and virtual events that many in the party admit are not nearly as compelling as the face-to-face interactions with prospective voters at rallies and on front porches. Dallas News, 10 Jan. 2022 To stem that, 60% admit to checking their work emails during PTO, which often doesn’t even help; 61% have to work longer hours post-PTO to catch up anyway. Jane Thier, Fortune, 5 Dec. 2022 Even high school graduates who plan to go to college admit to doubts. Jon Marcus, NBC News, 10 Aug. 2022 Even when people take time out, half admit to bringing their work laptops on vacation, and 41% frequently join video calls, which leaves them even more exhausted. David Morel, Forbes, 1 Aug. 2022 Hours after the incident, Beamish met with his accomplice and a witness, who allegedly heard Beamish admit to participating in the home invasion but didn’t know that Boerma had died from his injuries, Murphy said. William Lee, Chicago Tribune, 23 May 2022 In a separate study, of those who work from home, about 91% admit to not taking a break — not even for lunch. Ebony Williams, ajc, 6 May 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'admit.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English admitten, borrowed from Anglo-French admitter, admetter, admettre, borrowed from Latin admittere "to allow entrance or approach," from ad- ad- + mittere "to release, let go, discharge, let fly, throw down, send (for a purpose)," perhaps going back to Indo-European *mei̯th2- "alternate, exchange, remove" (assuming sense shift "exchange" > "give, bestow" > "let go, send"), from whence, with varying ablaut grades, Sanskrit méthati "treats hostilely, abuses," mitháḥ "mutually, alternately," míthū "in opposed directions, wrongly," Avestan mōiθat̰ "will deprive," hǝ̄m.aibī.mōist "(s/he) joins," West Germanic *meiþ-a- "conceal, avoid" (presumably "remove" > "remove oneself"), whence Old English mīðan "to conceal, dissemble," Old Saxon miđan, Old High German mīdan "to avoid, shy away from, conceal"

Note: See also forms at etymology of mutable descending from a causative derivative *moi̯th2-. The short vowel and geminate consonant in mittere is usually explained as an instance of the "littera-rule" (or "Iuppiter-rule"), whereby certain pre-Latin diphthongs are resolved as either long vowel + single consonant or short vowel + geminate consonant; in most such cases examples of both alternates are attested, though in this instance no attestation of mīt- is known.

Noun

derivative of admit entry 1

First Known Use

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1974, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of admit was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near admit

Cite this Entry

“Admit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/admit. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

admit

verb
ad·​mit əd-ˈmit How to pronounce admit (audio)
ad-
admitted; admitting
1
a
: to allow room for : permit
a question that admits two answers
b
: to make known usually with some unwillingness
admitted that he really didn't know
admit a mistake
2
: to allow entry : let in
admit a state to the Union

Medical Definition

admit

transitive verb
ad·​mit əd-ˈmit, ad- How to pronounce admit (audio)
admitted; admitting
: to accept (someone) into a hospital, clinic, or other treatment facility as an inpatient
he was admitted last night for chest pains

Legal Definition

admit

verb
ad·​mit
admitted; admitting

transitive verb

1
: to concede as true or valid : make an admission of
2
: to allow to be entered or offered
admitted the document into evidence
admit a will to probate

intransitive verb

: to make acknowledgment
used with to
admits to the murder

More from Merriam-Webster on admit

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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