1

judge

play
noun \ˈjəj\

Definition of judge

  1. :  one who makes judgments: such asa :  a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a courtb :  one appointed to decide in a contest or competition :  umpirec :  one who gives an authoritative opiniond :  critice often capitalized :  a tribal hero exercising leadership among the Hebrews after the death of Joshua

judgeship

play \ˈjəj-ˌship\ noun

Examples of judge in a Sentence

  1. You should not judge people by their appearance.

  2. He was trying to judge the strength of his opponent.

  3. We should do whatever we judge to be the right thing.

  4. Who are you to judge me?

  5. He feels that they have judged him unfairly.

  6. Don't judge her too severely.

  7. The jury will be asked to judge the defendant's guilt.

  8. If you are accused of a crime you have the right to be judged by a jury of your peers.

Origin and Etymology of judge

Middle English juge, from Anglo-French, from Latin judex —see 2judge


2

judge

verb

Definition of judge

judged

;

judging

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1 :  to form an opinion about through careful weighing of evidence and testing of premises

  3. 2 :  to form an estimate or evaluation of trying to judge the amount of time required; especially :  to form a negative opinion about shouldn't judge him because of his accent

  4. 3 :  to hold as an opinion :  guess, think I judge she knew what she was doing

  5. 4 :  to sit in judgment on :  try judge a case

  6. 5 :  to determine or pronounce after inquiry and deliberation They judged him guilty.

  7. 6 :  govern, rule —used of a Hebrew tribal leader

  8. intransitive verb
  9. 1 :  to form an opinion

  10. 2 :  to decide as a judge

judger

noun

Examples of judge in a Sentence

  1. She's one of the strictest judges in the state.

  2. He served as a judge at the baking contest.

  3. I don't think we should trust her. Let me be the judge of that.

  4. She is a good judge of character.

Origin and Etymology of judge

Middle English juggen, from Anglo-French juger, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say — more at just, diction

Synonym Discussion of judge

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word


JUDGE Defined for English Language Learners

judge

play
verb

Definition of judge for English Language Learners

  • : to form an opinion about (something or someone) after careful thought

  • : to regard (someone) as either good or bad

  • law : to make an official decision about (a legal case)

judge

noun

Definition of judge for English Language Learners

  • law : a person who has the power to make decisions on cases brought before a court of law

  • : a person who decides the winner in a contest or competition

  • : a person who makes a decision or judgment


JUDGE Defined for Kids

1

judge

play
verb \ˈjəj\

Definition of judge for Students

judged

;

judging

  1. 1 :  to form an opinion after careful consideration I judged the distance badly.

  2. 2 :  to act with authority to reach a decision (as in a trial)

  3. 3 :  think 1 What do you judge is the best solution?

  4. 4 :  to form an opinion of in comparison with others She judged pies at the fair.

Word Root of judge

The Latin word jus, meaning “law” or “rights,” and its form juris give us the roots jus and jur. Words from the Latin jus have something to do with law. A juror is a person who decides the facts of a case in a court of law. A jury is a group of jurors. When a decision in a court is just, it is fair and right and agrees with the law. Even the first two letters of judge, to form an opinion about whether something follows the law and is right, come from jus.


2

judge

play
noun

Definition of judge for Students

  1. 1 :  a public official whose duty is to decide questions brought before a court

  2. 2 :  a person appointed to decide in a contest or competition

  3. 3 :  a person with the experience to give a meaningful opinion :  critic He's a good judge of talent.


Law Dictionary

1

judge

play
verb \ˈjəj\

Legal Definition of judge

judged

judging

  1. transitive verb
  2. 1 :  to hear and decide (as a litigated question) in a court of justice judge a case

  3. 2 :  to pronounce after inquiry and deliberation he was judged incompetent

  4. intransitive verb
  5. :  to make a determination :  decide judge between two accounts

Origin and Etymology of judge

Old French jugier, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say


2

judge

noun

Legal Definition of judge

  1. :  a public official vested with the authority to hear, determine, and preside over legal matters brought in court; also :  one (as a justice of the peace) who performs one or more functions of such an official



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