institute

noun
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin(t)-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\

Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that is instituted: such as
a : an organization for the promotion of a cause : association a research institute an institute for the blind
b : an educational institution and especially one devoted to technical fields
c : a usually brief intensive course of instruction on selected topics relating to a particular field an urban studies institute
d(1) : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
(2) institutes plural : a collection of such principles and precepts especially : a legal compendium

institute

verb
instituted; instituting

Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to originate and get established : organize
b : to set going : inaugurate instituting an investigation
2 : to establish in a position or office

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Other Words from institute

Verb

instituter or institutor \ ˈin(t)-​stə-​ˌtü-​tər , -​ˌtyü-​ \ noun

Examples of institute in a Sentence

Noun

They founded an institute for research into the causes of mental illness. the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Verb

By instituting these programs, we hope to improve our children's education. They have instituted new policies to increase public safety.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

His second institute, the Allen Institute of Artificial Intelligence or AI2, is designed to hone in on research in artificial intelligence that could create breakthroughs in industries such as health care and education. Rachel Lerman, The Seattle Times, "Paul Allen, Microsoft co-founder and Seahawks owner, dies at 65," 16 Oct. 2018 Some have started to close already: The University of North Florida, the University of Illinois, and Texas A&M have all shuttered their institutes this year. Alex Ward, Vox, "Trump’s China strategy is the most radical in decades — and it’s failing," 18 Sep. 2018 Three online polls made after Macron’s speech by Odoxa, Opinionway and Elabe institutes show that a majority of respondents still shows sympathy for the Yellow Vest movement, but the support appears to be receding compared to previous weeks. Sylvie Corbet, The Seattle Times, "France’s Macron caught between protests, Strasbourg attack," 12 Dec. 2018 Community colleges and universities are building cybersecurity institutes. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "Want to Be A Hacker? Go to Dallas.," 4 Dec. 2018 Analysis from the Brennan Center for Justice, NYU Law School's nonpartisan law and policy institute, shows that Republicans took control of approximately 17 seats in Congress in 2016 through gerrymandering. Avery Matera, Teen Vogue, "Gerrymander Jewelry Is Fighting Racial Redistricting with a Line of Necklaces," 27 Sep. 2018 That’s true according to a study coming from a libertarian (read: not Democrat) institute. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Mollie Tibbetts's Murder Proves We Need the Violence Against Women Act More Than Ever," 30 Aug. 2018 The institute tested the system with the adaptive cruise control turned off, but automatic braking on. Tom Krisher, Fox News, "Semi-autonomous car safety systems flawed, study finds," 7 Aug. 2018 The legislation will authorize the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create new research centers at universities, federal laboratories, and nonprofit research institutes, according to a committee spokesperson. Gabriel Popkin, Science | AAAS, "Updated: Quantum physics gets attention—and brighter funding prospects—in Congress," 27 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

So much so that in April of 2018, the city instituted an all-out ban on Airbnb rentals in an attempt to modulate apartment rental prices for island habitués. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, "Why Winter Is the Most Inspiring Time to Visit Majorca," 25 Dec. 2018 Cheese exports have suffered since Mexico and China, major dairy buyers, instituted retaliatory tariffs on U.S. cheese and whey. Heather Haddon, WSJ, "America Can’t Move Its Cheese," 17 Dec. 2018 But on Wednesday, the day after Micaela was apprehended, President Donald Trump signed an executive order effectively halting the family separations that his own administration had instituted. NBC News, "In the chaos of Trump's policy reversal, families aren't split but monitored," 24 June 2018 The new number is the lowest any administration has instituted since the government began setting limits on refugees in 1980. Hamed Aleaziz, San Francisco Chronicle, "Once a haven for refugees, California sees admissions dwindle under Trump," 11 June 2018 Portland adopted a green bond resolution after learning from peer cities in the C40 network, while Chicago instituted new bus rapid transit programs due to insight from international cities who already established such routes. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Climate Mayors: The impact a year after the U.S. left the Paris agreement," 30 May 2018 The suit was filed Wednesday night in state supreme court in Brooklyn against New York state, which instituted the fee, and against New York City, which licenses vehicles and drivers and monitors trip records. Paul Berger, WSJ, "Judge Stalls Congestion Fee on Manhattan Taxis," 20 Dec. 2018 The former president also halted new coal leases on federal lands and instituted new rules to limit methane emissions on federal land. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "Drilling on US public lands causes 24 percent of the nation’s CO2 emissions," 27 Nov. 2018 In the next Congress, lawmakers likely will focus on the process of instituting a new law regarding private care for veterans and a handful of other measures passed in the first two years of the Trump administration. WSJ, "Meet the New Agenda Setters in the House," 7 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'institute.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of institute

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for institute

Verb

Middle English, from Latin institutus, past participle of instituere, from in- + statuere to set up — more at statute

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Statistics for institute

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for institute

The first known use of institute was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for institute

institute

verb

English Language Learners Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to begin or create (something, such as a new law, rule, or system)

institute

noun

English Language Learners Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

: an organization created for a particular purpose (such as research or education)

institute

verb
in·​sti·​tute | \ ˈin-stə-ˌtüt, -ˌtyüt\
instituted; instituting

Kids Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin or establish The library instituted new rules.
2 : to give a start to Police instituted an investigation.

institute

noun

Kids Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an organization for the promotion of a cause an institute for scientific research
2 : a place for study usually in a special field an art institute

institute

transitive verb
in·​sti·​tute
instituted; instituting

Legal Definition of institute

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to establish in a particular position or office specifically, in the civil law of Louisiana : to appoint as heir — see also instituted heir at heir
2 : to get started : bring institute a lawsuit

institute

noun

Legal Definition of institute (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an elementary principle recognized as authoritative
2  plural : a collection of principles especially : a legal compendium

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