fund

noun
\ ˈfənd \

Definition of fund 

(Entry 1 of 3)

1a : a sum of money or other resources whose principal or interest is set apart for a specific objective
b : money on deposit on which checks or drafts can be drawn usually used in plural
c : capital
d funds plural : the stock of the British national debt usually used with the
2 : an available quantity of material or intangible resources : supply
3 funds plural : available pecuniary resources
4 : an organization administering a special fund

fund

verb
funded; funding; funds

Definition of fund (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to make provision of resources for discharging the interest or principal of
b : to provide funds for a federally funded program
2 : to place in a fund : accumulate
3 : to convert into a debt that is payable either at a distant date or at no definite date and that bears a fixed interest fund a floating debt

Definition of fund (Entry 3 of 3)

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Other Words from fund

Verb

funder \ ˈfən-​dər \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for fund

Synonyms: Noun

account, budget, deposit, kitty, nest egg, pool

Synonyms: Verb

endow, finance, subsidize

Antonyms: Verb

defund, disendow

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Examples of fund in a Sentence

Noun

The fund was established to aid the poor. All her funds were in a checking account. His funds were getting lower as he continued to look for a job. The comedian had a large fund of jokes.

Verb

The group funded three new scholarships. Who funds the company pension plan?
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The startup is betting that its no-fee policy and a commitment to their donors will boost use of the platform: The money must be used to purchase a home, and HomeFundIt will hold onto the fund for a maximum of one year to protect the donors. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "Should Your Friends Crowdfund The Down Payment On Your Home? This Start-Up Thinks So," 18 Dec. 2018 Depending on the retailer, the percentage of a transaction that goes into the UpIt fund can be as high as 10 percent. Jeff Andrews, Curbed, "Need money for a down payment on a house? There’s an app for that.," 17 Dec. 2018 Or skip that fancy indoor cycling class once a month and donate the funds to your favorite organization. Linda Davis Taylor, SELF, "Beyond Giving Tuesday: How to Make a Giving Plan and Why You Need One," 26 Nov. 2018 Since its inception, the fund has opened five million acres of public land and put $16 billion toward conservation and outdoor recreation. James Lynch, Popular Mechanics, "The Inaccessibility of Our Public Lands," 25 Nov. 2018 An indictment accuses Hunter and his wife of misspending more than $250,000 in campaign funds on everything from tequila shots to airfare for a family pet. Fox News, "Indicted California incumbent steps up attacks on Democrat," 16 Oct. 2018 Bank Street leaders have raised funds to continue the program through spring, and hope to expand it further. Leslie Brody, WSJ, "Coaching Caregivers for the Littlest Learners," 22 Dec. 2018 In 1997, Holly and Rodney founded the HollyRod Foundation, a charity dedicated to raising funds to fight Parkinson’s disease and autism. Emma Dibdin, Country Living, "Who Is Holly Robinson Peete? Meet the Star of Hallmark Movie, ‘Christmas in Evergreen’," 18 Nov. 2018 On Puerto Rico: Noah ends the video with a plea to donate to the Puerto Rico relief fund. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Noah Centineo Talks About His Love Life In This Old Video That Just Resurfaced and It’s Everything," 22 Aug. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Based on the memoir by Cheryl Strayed, Wild was funded out of Witherspoon’s own coffers and gave her the chance to play a new kind of character. Zoë Ghertner, Vogue, "Reese Witherspoon: Activist, Advocate, Hollywood’s Moral Compass," 10 Jan. 2019 Most new players, however, aren't funded by Bill Gates—still valued by Forbes to have a fortune north of $93 billion. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Bill Gates's Experimental Nuclear Power Plant Halts Construction in China," 2 Jan. 2019 To-Win is funding both court cases, according to Kobre & Kim. Sean O'kane, The Verge, "Federal court freezes Faraday Future CEO’s ownership stake, California mansions," 14 Dec. 2018 Emerson — which also focuses on immigration, education and the environment — has also funded a lot of nonprofit journalism organizations, including ProPublica, Mother Jones, Marshall Project, Committee to Protect Journalists and the Texas Observer. Kara Swisher, Recode, "Laurene Powell Jobs’s Emerson Collective bought Pop-Up Magazine Productions," 27 Nov. 2018 With $15 million now available, all schools that met grant requirements were approved and will be funded, according to Monday's news release. Arika Herron, Indianapolis Star, "Indiana schools can get handheld metal detectors for free through new state safety program," 9 July 2018 Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images President Donald Trump is using the government shutdown to try to force Democrats to fund his Mexican border wall. Dylan Scott, Vox, "Why the government shutdown is good legal news for Trump," 27 Dec. 2018 One of the biggest ways to fund a new tech hub in Middle America? Theodore Schleifer, Recode, "The 2019 IPO class headlined by Uber will create a ton of new wealth. Will the billions go to mansions or missions?," 20 Dec. 2018 Transit agencies will have access to incentive and grant money to fund the transition, some of which will be provided by the state's utilities, which stand to benefit from the additional industrial-sized customers. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "California transit agencies have 21 years to build zero-emissions bus fleets," 16 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fund.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fund

Noun

1628, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb

1764, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for fund

Noun

earlier fond, borrowed (with later respelling after Latin fundus) from French fond "bottom, base, foundation," (in plural) "sum of money, capital, resources," going back to Old French funt, font "bottom, base, cultivated ground," going back to Latin fundus — more at bottom entry 1

Verb

derivative of fund entry 1

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Learn More about fund

Statistics for fund

Last Updated

14 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fund

The first known use of fund was in 1628

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More Definitions for fund

fund

noun

Financial Definition of fund

What It Is

Fund usually refers to mutual fund, which is an open-ended investment company that pools investors' money into a fund operated by a portfolio manager. This manager then turns around and invests this large pool of shareholder money in a portfolio of various assets or combinations of assets.

How It Works

Funds may include investments in stocks, bonds, options, futures, currencies, treasuries and money market securities. Depending on the stated objective of the fund, each will vary in regard to content and risk.

Funds issue and redeem shares on demand at the fund's NAV, or net asset value. Mutual fund management fees typically range between 0.5% and 2% of assets per year, but 12b-1 fees, exchange fees and other administrative charges also apply.

There are several different types of funds of which you should be aware:

Closed-End Funds: Closed-end mutual funds issue a fixed number of shares to the investing public and usually trade on the major exchanges just like corporate stocks. Closed-end funds often invest in a particular sector, a specific industry or a certain country.
Open-End Funds: Open-end mutual funds stand ready to issue and redeem shares on a continuous basis. Shareholders buy the shares at net asset value (NAV) and can redeem them at the current market price.
Load Funds: The term "load" refers to the sales charge paid by an investor who purchases shares in a mutual fund. When the sales charge is imposed at the time of purchase, this is known as a front-end load. Conversely, back-end loads represent charges that are assessed when the investor eventually sells the fund.
No-Load Funds: A no-load fund is sold without a sales charge.

Additionally, a given fund may issue different classes of its shares to investors. The most common variations of share classes for load funds are front-load A shares, back-end-load B shares and level-load C shares.

Class A Shares: A mutual fund's A shares charge a front-end load at the time of purchase. This is a sales fee that is charged as a percentage of the total investment and is used to compensate the financial representative who sells the fund. The amount of the front-end load is subtracted from the original investment. For example: If an investor places $10,000 in a mutual fund with a front-end load of 2%, then the total sales charge would be $200. The remaining $9,800 will go toward the purchase of shares in the fund. Also, A shares may impose an asset-based sales charge. Investors do not pay these charges directly. Instead, they are taken from the fund's assets. The fund then uses these fees to market and distribute its shares. The 12b-1 fee, which can equal a maximum of 0.25% per year, is an example of an asset-based sales charge.
Class B Shares: B Shares charge back-end loads. When an investor purchases B shares, the sales charge is deferred until the fund is sold. This deferred load usually decreases each year. B shares typically charge a higher asset-based sales charge than Class A Shares. For example, the B shares of a fund may carry a 5% load if shares are sold within the first year. This back-end load of 5%, however, could be reduced by 1% every year until it is eliminated in the fifth year. Some B shares automatically convert to A shares after a specified period of time, which reduces the 12b-1 fees.
Class C Shares: C Shares typically do not impose a front-end load but will often charge a nominal fee if the shares are sold within one year. Class C shares often impose a high asset-based sales charge but will not convert to A shares when the load reverts to zero.

Why It Matters

It is an important for an investor to consider mutual funds among their investment opportunities. Just as with any investment, the pros and cons must be compared.

Advantages of investing in funds include:

Professional management
Investment diversification
Liquidity
Explicit investment goals
Simple reinvestment programs

Disadvantages:

Many funds charge hefty fees, leading to lower overall returns.
Statistics show that most actively managed funds tend to underperform their benchmark averages over time.
Funds cannot be bought or sold during regular trading hours, but instead are priced just once per day.

Source: Investing Answers

index fund

noun

Financial Definition of index fund

What It Is

Index funds are mutual funds that are designed to track the performance of a particular index.

How It Works

When an investor purchases a share of an index fund, he or she is purchasing a share of a portfolio that contains the securities in an underlying index. The index fund holds the securities in the same proportion as they occur in the actual index, and when the index decreases in value, the fund's shares decrease as well, and vice versa. The only time an index buys or sells a stock is when the index itself changes (either in weighting or in composition). Index funds have ticker symbols and are traded on all major exchanges.

Index funds are available for most any index. Some index funds replicate broad market indexes, and some replicate indexes that only contain securities with special characteristics, including minimum financial ratios, participation in a certain industry,  geography, or other distinctions.

The performance of an index fund usually does not exactly match the actual index's performance. This is because index funds charge management fees, which eat into returns, and because the fund's weighting in particular securities may not perfectly match the weighting of the securities in the actual index. The degree to which the fund and the index returns differ is called tracking error.

Why It Matters

Index funds are a popular way to participate in the stock market and diversify a portfolio. Index funds have several major advantages over direct ownership of the underlying securities. Here's a brief review:

Diversification -- Each index fund represents an interest in an underlying basket of securities. This allows investors to gain broad exposure to a large group of companies easily. This diversification also makes index funds much less volatile than individual securities. Foreign index funds in particular make diversifying abroad less difficult and expensive; they also offer exposure to entire foreign markets and market segments.

Low Cost -- Buying and selling shares of an index fund is far less expensive than separately buying and selling a basket of underlying shares. Also, the decision of which securities to invest in is determined by the index rather than by active management. This is why index funds usually have minimal expense ratios and are often more affordable than other diversified investment vehicles. However, many have minimum investment requirements and front- or back-end loads, making them impractical for some investors.

Liquidity
-- Index fund shares are bought and sold on major exchanges every day, and many funds trade hundreds of thousands (and in some cases millions) of shares per day. Buying and selling shares of an index fund can be faster and more convenient than buying and selling the underlying shares.

Dividends -- Many index funds pass through the accumulated dividends paid by their underlying stocks. Over time, these dividends can add up to a significant sum.

Choices
-- Some index funds track broad U.S. equity market indexes. Meanwhile, others track specific sectors or industry groups. Still others represent an interest in baskets of foreign stocks. And finally, others invest exclusively in the bond market.

Returns
-- Studies have proven that over time, the average mutual fund typically fails to beat the broad indexes. With this in mind, index funds are a great way to capture broader-market returns. For adherents to the efficient market hypothesis, which states that it is impossible to outperform the broad stock market over the long haul, index funds can be a way to optimize portfolio returns.

Source: Investing Answers

vulture fund

noun

Financial Definition of vulture fund

What It Is

A vulture fund is a pool of investor money that makes investments in securities from distressed issuers (usually bonds).

How It Works

Let's say Company XYZ has lost 75% of its customers due to a food-poisoning scandal. The stock has lost 90% of its value, and the market does not believe the company can recover. Company XYZ still owns, however, a patent on a packaging technique that could be licensed and applied in other industries. Vulture Fund ABC knows this and buys high-yield bonds in Company XYZ, betting that the value of that patent might resurrect the company or at least ensure the return of capital plus interest if the patent is sold during bankruptcy.

Vulture funds often also purchase debt from lenders. So, for instance, if Bank DEF had lended $15 million to Company XYZ and Bank DEF wants to get this debt off the books, it might sell that debt to a vulture fund, similar to how credit card companies might sell customer debts to collection agencies. The vulture fund then negotiates with Company XYZ to secure a payout greater than the vulture fund's initial investment.

Vulture funds also invest in sovereign debt, which is the debt of countries' governments. When countries are struggling, vulture funds might purchase this debt and then become heavily involved and influential in the government's restructuring.

Why It Matters

Vulture funds often get a bad rap for circling dying companies in the hopes of picking off the last meat on a carcass for a quick profit. However, the analogy should sometimes be more like giving CPR. Vulture funds are often the last chance companies have to come back to life, and the funds' offers to provide cash may be the last attempt these companies can make to rescuscitate themselves.

Source: Investing Answers

fund

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fund

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an amount of money that is used for a special purpose

funds : available money

: an amount of something that is available for use : a supply of something

fund

verb

English Language Learners Definition of fund (Entry 2 of 2)

: to provide money for (something)

fund

noun
\ ˈfənd \

Kids Definition of fund

1 : a sum of money for a special purpose a book fund
2 funds plural : available money I'm out of funds until I get paid.
3 : stock entry 1 sense 1, supply a fund of knowledge

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fund

noun

Legal Definition of fund 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a sum of money or other resources whose principal or interest is set aside for a specific objective
client security fund
: a fund established by each state to compensate clients for losses suffered due to their attorneys' misappropriation of funds
common trust fund
: an in-house trust fund established by a bank trust department to pool the assets of many small trusts for greater diversification in investing
executor fund
: a fund established in estate planning to provide for the payment of final expenses by an executor
joint welfare fund
: a fund that is established by collective bargaining to provide health and welfare benefits to employees and that is jointly administered by representatives of labor and management
paid-in fund
: a reserve cash fund in lieu of a capital stock account set up by mutual insurance companies to cover unforeseen losses
sinking fund
: a fund set up and accumulated by regular deposits for paying off the principal on a debt or for other specified purposes (as self-insurance)
strike fund
: a fund accumulated by a union through special assessments or from general funds and used to pay striking workers or for other strike-related activities
Taft-Hartley fund \ ˈtaft-​ˈhärt-​lē-​ \ after the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, which established it
: joint welfare fund in this entry
trust fund
: property (as money or securities) settled or held in a trust
2 : an organization administering a special fund
exchange-traded fund
: a fund that is similar to an index fund in tracking a stock index but that is traded on the stock market
growth fund
: a mutual fund that invests in the stock of growth companies
hedge fund
: an investing group usually in the form of a limited partnership that employs speculative techniques in the hope of obtaining large capital gains
index fund
: a mutual fund that invests to reflect the composition of the market as a whole by matching its investments to a stock index
mutual fund
: an investment company that invests its shareholders' money in a usually diversified group of securities of other companies
vulture fund
: an investment company that buys up bankrupt or insolvent companies with the goal of reorganizing them so they can be profitably resold as going concerns

Legal Definition of fund (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : to make provision of resources for discharging the principal or interest of
b : to provide financial resources for
2 : to place in a fund
3 : to convert into a debt that is payable either at a distant date or at no definite date and that bears a fixed interest

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More from Merriam-Webster on fund

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fund

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fund

Spanish Central: Translation of fund

Nglish: Translation of fund for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fund for Arabic Speakers

Comments on fund

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