emancipate

verb

eman·​ci·​pate i-ˈman(t)-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio)
emancipated; emancipating

transitive verb

1
: to free from restraint, control, or the power of another
especially : to free from bondage
2
: to release from parental care and responsibility and make sui juris
3
: to free from any controlling influence (such as traditional mores or beliefs)
emancipator noun
emancipatory adjective
Choose the Right Synonym for emancipate

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint.

free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses.

freed the animals from their cages

release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation.

released his anger on a punching bag

liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty.

liberated their country from the tyrant

emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination.

labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery

manumit implies emancipation from slavery.

the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of emancipate in a Sentence

He felt the only way to emancipate himself from his parents was to move away. under the cover of darkness animal rights activists emancipated the inhabitants of the mink ranch
Recent Examples on the Web Meanwhile, Maryland had emancipated its enslaved population the year before, on Oct. 13, 1864, upon the ratification of the Maryland Constitution of 1864. Kevin Dayhoff, Baltimore Sun, 15 June 2024 German Jews, who were emancipated at the tail end of the Enlightenment period and throughout the Romantic era, took to Bildung almost as a new faith, or the natural development of the old one. John Ganz, Harper's Magazine, 22 May 2024 Instead of discussing Section 230, the complaint focused on criticizing content moderation decisions as violating a Civil Rights Act clause originally enacted to stop Ku Klux Klan from attacking and silencing emancipated slaves. Ashley Belanger, Ars Technica, 16 May 2024 Ukrainians see their existence in time and space as resting on this vision of a sovereign history, emancipated from Russia. Georgiy Kasianov, Foreign Affairs, 4 May 2022 See all Example Sentences for emancipate 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'emancipate.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Latin emancipatus, past participle of emancipare, from e- + mancipare to transfer ownership of, from mancip-, manceps contractor, from manus hand + capere to take — more at manual, heave entry 1

First Known Use

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of emancipate was in 1613

Dictionary Entries Near emancipate

Cite this Entry

“Emancipate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emancipate. Accessed 12 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

emancipate

verb
eman·​ci·​pate i-ˈman(t)-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio)
emancipated; emancipating
: to free from someone else's control or power
especially : to free from bondage
emancipation
-ˌman(t)-sə-ˈpā-shən
noun
emancipator noun
emancipatory adjective

Legal Definition

emancipate

transitive verb
eman·​ci·​pate i-ˈman-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio)
emancipated; emancipating
1
: to free from restraint, control, or the power of another
especially : to free from bondage
emancipated the slaves
compare enfranchise
2
: to release from the care, responsibility, and control of one's parents compare age of majority, legal age

Note: The circumstances under which a minor may become emancipated vary from state to state. In many states, however, the marriage of a minor results in his or her emancipation.

More from Merriam-Webster on emancipate

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