release

verb (1)
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to set free from restraint, confinement, or servitude release hostages release pent-up emotions release the brakes also : to let go : dismiss released from her job
2 : to relieve from something that confines, burdens, or oppresses was released from her promise
3 : to give up in favor of another : relinquish release a claim to property
4 : to give permission for publication, performance, exhibition, or sale of also : to make available to the public the commission released its findings release a new movie

intransitive verb

: to move from one's normal position (as in football or basketball) in order to assume another position or to perform a second assignment

release

noun

Definition of release (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : relief or deliverance from sorrow, suffering, or trouble
2a : discharge from obligation or responsibility
b(1) : relinquishment of a right or claim
(2) : an act by which a legal right is discharged specifically : a conveyance of a right in lands or tenements to another having an estate in possession
3a : the act or an instance of liberating or freeing (as from restraint)
b : the act or manner of concluding a musical tone or phrase
c : the act or manner of ending a sound : the movement of one or more vocal organs in quitting the position for a speech sound
d : the action or manner of throwing a ball has a quick release
4 : an instrument effecting a legal release
5 : the state of being freed
6 : a device adapted to hold or release a mechanism as required
7a : the act of permitting performance or publication also : performance, publication became a best seller on its release
b : the matter released especially : a statement prepared for the press

re-lease

verb (2)
\ (ˌ)rē-ˈlēs How to pronounce re-lease (audio) \
re-leased; re-leasing; re-leases

Definition of re-lease (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to lease again

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Other Words from release

Verb (1)

releasable \ ri-​ˈlē-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce releasable (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for release

Synonyms: Verb (1)

loose, loosen, uncork, unleash, unlock, unloose, unloosen

Synonyms: Noun

delivery, discharge, quietus, quittance

Antonyms: Verb (1)

bridle, check, constrain, contain, control, curb, govern, hold, inhibit, regulate, rein (in), restrain, smother, tame

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Choose the Right Synonym for release

Verb (1)

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of release in a Sentence

Verb (1)

The hostages have been released. The judge released the prisoner. The lion was released from its cage. There is a lot of controversy over whether or not wolves should be released into the park. I released my son's hand, and he ran out onto the playground. The factory faced serious fines for releasing dangerous chemicals into the river. Heat is released into the atmosphere by cars. During exercise, the body releases chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. She started to cry, releasing all of her repressed emotion. Exercise is a good way to release stress.

Noun

the release of the hostages The prisoner is eligible for early release. There was a controversy over the release of wolves into the park. The prisoner was given an early release. the release of heat into the atmosphere Exercise triggers the release of chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. an accidental release of pollutants into the river They've filed a request for release from the contract. They're requesting a release from their contractual obligations. The release of the book is scheduled for next month.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Now, nearly three decades later, footage of the concert, shot by Warner Brothers and directed by Sydney Pollack in January 1972, has finally been released this month for a film aptly titled Amazing Grace. Brooke Bobb, Vogue, "In Amazing Grace, Aretha Franklin Reminds Us That Fashion Can Be Divine," 10 Apr. 2019 The American Cancer Society has released its annual statistics report for 2019, giving us even more reason to step up our sun-care routine. Rebecca Dancer, Allure, "The American Cancer Society's Annual Report Reveals Melanoma Cases Continue to Rise," 5 Apr. 2019 Unlike some of their other drinks that have been released recently, the Cloud Macchiato is a permanent addition to their menu, so fans don't have to worry about only having a limited time to go try it out. Tamara Fuentes, Seventeen, "Ariana Grande Just Dropped a Starbucks Drink and Coffee-Lovers are Obsessed," 5 Mar. 2019 An official White House announcement has not yet been released, but multiple outlets reported that the administration issued the proposal last Friday. Korin Miller, SELF, "Here's What a 'Domestic Gag Rule' on Abortion Would Actually Mean for All of Us," 22 Feb. 2019 The new report — plus a separate report from the University of Oxford also released Monday — provides a fresh look at how social platforms were unwittingly used to influence voter opinion ahead of the 2016 election. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Instagram posts from Russian meddlers played a much bigger role in the 2016 election than we thought," 17 Dec. 2018 And the North American Menopause Society and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) have both released statements critical of these devices. Elizabeth Siegel, Allure, "Vaginal Rejuvenation Is on the Rise, But the Results Often Don't Live Up to the Hype," 27 Mar. 2019 The National Space Weather Predication Center, part of NOAA, has released a geothermal storm warning for Saturday with a map showing Seattle, Chicago, Boston and New York as some of the major cities most likely to see the Aurora Borealis. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "You Can See The Northern Lights Across The US This Weekend," 22 Mar. 2019 XPO’s fourth-quarter earnings released last month also missed expectations, in part, the company said, because its biggest customer unexpectedly pulled about $600 million in business in late 2018. Jennifer Smith, WSJ, "XPO Logistics Dropped Acquisition Bid After Short-Seller Report, CEO Says," 13 Mar. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

However, fans have been able to pick up a number of items already tied to the album's release during Ariana's current tour. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Ariana Grande Has Started Working on a Possible “Thank U, Next” Beauty Line," 10 Apr. 2019 Now Democrats are demanding that the IRS release six years of Mr. Trump’s returns to them, triggering a political and legal fight that voters will ultimately have to judge. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Many Unhappy Trump Returns," 8 Apr. 2019 There’s no release date attached, but generally ratings aren’t done until the game’s close to release. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "This week in games: Borderlands 3 is an Epic exclusive, Obsidian shows off The Outer Worlds," 5 Apr. 2019 The minute news of the release hit my inbox, I was pumped, and not just because the brand has fabulous products. Jihan Forbes, Allure, "I Tried Oribe's New Collection for Afro-Textured Hair, and Here’s My Honest Review," 4 Apr. 2019 This is huge for those of us who have begging and pleading for something similar to The Beyoncé Experience Live, the special DVD release that recapped her third world tour of the same name. Ineye Komonibo, Marie Claire, "Is Beyoncé Working on New Music?," 3 Apr. 2019 While appearing to be a normal, attractive, vase, it can be broken to release the release a secret stash of potassium carbonate inside. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Samsung's 'Firevase' Is a Smashing Fire Extinguisher," 28 Mar. 2019 The internet sleuths are on the case and some are predicting an album release as soon as this Friday! Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "6 Signs That Taylor Swift is Coming Out with a New Album," 26 Feb. 2019 Still, the release of disappointing U.S. data is a worrying sign for economic activity. Jessica Menton, WSJ, "Dow Slips After Disappointing Retail Sales," 14 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'release.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of release

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1828, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for release

Verb (1)

Middle English relesen, from Anglo-French relesser, from Latin relaxare to relax

Noun

Middle English reles, from Anglo-French, from relesser

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Statistics for release

Last Updated

13 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for release

The first known use of release was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for release

release

verb

English Language Learners Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to allow (a person or animal) to leave a jail, cage, prison, etc. : to set (someone or something) free
: to stop holding (someone or something)
: to allow (a substance) to enter the air, water, soil, etc.

release

noun

English Language Learners Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of allowing a person or animal to leave a jail, cage, prison, etc.
: the act of allowing a substance to enter the air, water, soil, etc.
: the act of freeing someone from a duty, responsibility, etc.

release

verb
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Kids Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to set free or let go of The fish was caught and released. He released his hold on the rope.
2 : to allow to escape The factory released chemicals into the river.
3 : to relieve from a duty, responsibility, or burden She released him from his promise.
4 : to give up or hand over to someone else I released my claim.
5 : to permit to be published, sold, or shown The movie will be released next month.

release

noun

Kids Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of setting free or letting go release of a prisoner
2 : the act of allowing something to escape the release of smoke
3 : a discharge from an obligation or responsibility
4 : relief or rescue from sorrow, suffering, or trouble release from pain
5 : a device for holding or releasing a mechanism
6 : the act of making something available to the public
7 : something (as a new product or song) that is made available to the public

release

transitive verb
re·​lease
released; releasing

Legal Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : to relieve or free from obligation, liability, or responsibility the debtor is released from all dischargeable debts
b : to give up (a claim, title, or right) to the benefit of another person : surrender
2 : to set free from confinement was released on personal recognizance

release

noun

Legal Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : discharge from an obligation or responsibility that bars a cause of action did not effect a release of the school for any negligence
b : the giving up or renunciation of a right or claim that bars a cause of action was a release of the remainder of the debt

Note: A release may in some situations require consideration in order to be valid. A release of one joint obligor sometimes is considered to release all the obligors.

2 : an act or instrument that effects a release signed a release issued by the insurer

called also release of all claims

— compare hold harmless
3 : the act or instance of freeing especially from custody

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More from Merriam-Webster on release

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for release

Spanish Central: Translation of release

Nglish: Translation of release for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of release for Arabic Speakers

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