emancipate

verb
eman·​ci·​pate | \ i-ˈman(t)-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio) \
emancipated; emancipating

Definition of emancipate

transitive verb

1 : to free from restraint, control, or the power of another especially : to free from bondage
2 : to release from parental care and responsibility and make sui juris
3 : to free from any controlling influence (such as traditional mores or beliefs)

Other Words from emancipate

emancipator \ i-​ˈman(t)-​sə-​ˌpā-​tər How to pronounce emancipate (audio) \ noun
emancipatory \ i-​ˈman(t)-​sə-​pə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce emancipate (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for emancipate

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of emancipate in a Sentence

He felt the only way to emancipate himself from his parents was to move away. under the cover of darkness animal rights activists emancipated the inhabitants of the mink ranch
Recent Examples on the Web The original executive order was made by union troops in Galveston, Texas to emancipate over 250,000 Black slaves in the state. Scott Luxor, Sun Sentinel, 18 Aug. 2022 Over the course of a week-long session at the camp, Whistler butts heads with Jordan (played by Germaine), a trans and nonbinary teen who made a deal with their parents to legally emancipate themself after attending the camp. Wilson Chapman, Variety, 22 June 2022 Alexander Hamilton, Edmund Randolph, John Jay—indeed, just about every one of the Founders who went on record—affirmed that under the law of nations belligerents could emancipate enemy slaves in an effort to win a war or suppress a rebellion. James Oakes, The New York Review of Books, 12 May 2022 As the season unfolds, Edwina finds a way to emancipate herself from her older sister's opinions, just as Kate will learn to want things for herself. Sheena Scott, Forbes, 25 Mar. 2022 If money just gushes out of the ground in the form of hydrocarbons or diamonds or other minerals, the oppressors can emancipate themselves from the oppressed. David Remnick, The New Yorker, 11 Mar. 2022 The Christmas Princess springs from the same need as my memoir The Meaning of Mariah Carey — to emancipate the little girl in me. Daniela Avila, PEOPLE.com, 5 Feb. 2022 Over the past months, Spears has been using Instagram to communicate with fans and thank them for their continued support in her battle to emancipate herself from her conservatorship. Ruth Kinane, EW.com, 21 Sep. 2021 Over the past months, Spears has been using Instagram to communicate with fans and thank them for their continued support in her battle to emancipate herself from her conservatorship. Ruth Kinane, EW.com, 21 Sep. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emancipate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of emancipate

1613, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for emancipate

Latin emancipatus, past participle of emancipare, from e- + mancipare to transfer ownership of, from mancip-, manceps contractor, from manus hand + capere to take — more at manual, heave entry 1

Learn More About emancipate

Time Traveler for emancipate

Time Traveler

The first known use of emancipate was in 1613

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near emancipate

emanatory

emancipate

emancipated woman

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for emancipate

Last Updated

7 Sep 2022

Cite this Entry

“Emancipate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emancipate. Accessed 30 Sep. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for emancipate

emancipate

verb
eman·​ci·​pate | \ i-ˈman-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio) \
emancipated; emancipating

Kids Definition of emancipate

: to set free from control or slavery : liberate

Other Words from emancipate

emancipator \ -​ˌpā-​tər \ noun

emancipate

transitive verb
eman·​ci·​pate | \ i-ˈman-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce emancipate (audio) \
emancipated; emancipating

Legal Definition of emancipate

1 : to free from restraint, control, or the power of another especially : to free from bondage emancipated the slaves — compare enfranchise
2 : to release from the care, responsibility, and control of one's parents — compare age of majority, legal age

Note: The circumstances under which a minor may become emancipated vary from state to state. In many states, however, the marriage of a minor results in his or her emancipation.

More from Merriam-Webster on emancipate

Nglish: Translation of emancipate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of emancipate for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Odd Habits and Quirks

  • image1926873504
  • Which of the following best describes an easily irritated person?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!