liberate

verb
lib·​er·​ate | \ ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce liberate (audio) \
liberated; liberating

Definition of liberate

transitive verb

1 : to set at liberty : free specifically : to free (something, such as a country) from domination by a foreign power
2 : to free from combination liberate the gas by adding acid
3 : to take or take over illegally or unjustly material liberated from a nearby construction site— Thorne Dreyer

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Other Words from liberate

liberator \ ˈli-​bə-​ˌrā-​tər How to pronounce liberator (audio) \ noun
liberatory \ ˈli-​b(ə-​)rə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce liberatory (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for liberate

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of liberate in a Sentence

Rebels fought to liberate the country. Soldiers liberated the hostages from their captors. Laptop computers could liberate workers from their desks. He was using materials that he had liberated from a construction site.
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Recent Examples on the Web

When police raided the Stonewall Inn, LGBT bar patrons pushed back, throwing coins at police, liberating detainees from custody and attempting to light the bar on fire while police were still inside. Time, "Was Stonewall a Riot, an Uprising or a Rebellion?," 24 June 2019 Orwell thought of the poor as decent people, but he’d be baffled to observe today that the welfare state has created a class of layabouts who, liberated from economic anguish, shackle themselves to screens, drugs, alcohol. Kyle Smith, National Review, "What Would Orwell Think of Us?," 11 June 2019 Although he was liberated in 1945 after nearly three years of concentration camp internment, sadly none of his family survived the war. Sergio Carmona, sun-sentinel.com, "Sunny Isles Beach Holocaust survivor’s efforts inspire daughter," 6 June 2019 Then continue 30 miles northeast to Bayeux, home to the famous Bayeux Tapestry and the first large town to be liberated by the Allies. National Geographic, "In honor of D-Day, here’s how to visit the Normandy coast," 5 June 2019 Geiger appears at the outset of the video, stating that to her, being liberated is about freedom. Stephen Daw, Billboard, "Teddy Geiger Joins DeJ Loaf & Leon Bridges for Upbeat 'Liberated' Music Video," 21 June 2018 When Bapu is liberated from the cycle of birth and death, India is still an infant learning how to speak. Aaron Gilbreath, Longreads, "‘Choose Marriage or Education’," 29 May 2018 Meyers was a bit more serious talking about his new son's middle name, which honors his wife's grandparents, Holocaust survivors who met a day after they were liberated. Lisa Respers France, CNN, "Seth Meyers' son born in apartment lobby," 10 Apr. 2018 The month before, Manila had been liberated by Allied forces at a terrible cost. Alex Kingsbury, BostonGlobe.com, "You’ve got mail — for now," 10 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'liberate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of liberate

circa 1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for liberate

Latin liberatus, past participle of liberare, from liber — see liberal entry 1

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Statistics for liberate

Last Updated

7 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for liberate

The first known use of liberate was circa 1623

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More Definitions for liberate

liberate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of liberate

: to free (someone or something) from being controlled by another person, group, etc.
: to give freedom or more freedom to (someone)
humorous : to take or steal (something)

liberate

verb
lib·​er·​ate | \ ˈli-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce liberate (audio) \
liberated; liberating

Kids Definition of liberate

: to set free

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More from Merriam-Webster on liberate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with liberate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for liberate

Spanish Central: Translation of liberate

Nglish: Translation of liberate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of liberate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on liberate

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