release

verb (1)
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to set free from restraint, confinement, or servitude release hostages release pent-up emotions release the brakes also : to let go : dismiss released from her job
2 : to relieve from something that confines, burdens, or oppresses was released from her promise
3 : to give up in favor of another : relinquish release a claim to property
4 : to give permission for publication, performance, exhibition, or sale of also : to make available to the public the commission released its findings release a new movie

intransitive verb

: to move from one's normal position (as in football or basketball) in order to assume another position or to perform a second assignment

release

noun

Definition of release (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : relief or deliverance from sorrow, suffering, or trouble
2a : discharge from obligation or responsibility
b(1) : relinquishment of a right or claim
(2) : an act by which a legal right is discharged specifically : a conveyance of a right in lands or tenements to another having an estate in possession
3a : the act or an instance of liberating or freeing (as from restraint)
b : the act or manner of concluding a musical tone or phrase
c : the act or manner of ending a sound : the movement of one or more vocal organs in quitting the position for a speech sound
d : the action or manner of throwing a ball has a quick release
4 : an instrument effecting a legal release
5 : the state of being freed
6 : a device adapted to hold or release a mechanism as required
7a : the act of permitting performance or publication also : performance, publication became a best seller on its release
b : the matter released especially : a statement prepared for the press

re-lease

verb (2)
\ (ˌ)rē-ˈlēs How to pronounce re-lease (audio) \
re-leased; re-leasing; re-leases

Definition of re-lease (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to lease again

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Other Words from release

Verb (1)

releasable \ ri-​ˈlē-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce releasable (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for release

Synonyms: Verb (1)

loose, loosen, uncork, unleash, unlock, unloose, unloosen

Synonyms: Noun

delivery, discharge, quietus, quittance

Antonyms: Verb (1)

bridle, check, constrain, contain, control, curb, govern, hold, inhibit, regulate, rein (in), restrain, smother, tame

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Choose the Right Synonym for release

Verb (1)

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of release in a Sentence

Verb (1)

The hostages have been released. The judge released the prisoner. The lion was released from its cage. There is a lot of controversy over whether or not wolves should be released into the park. I released my son's hand, and he ran out onto the playground. The factory faced serious fines for releasing dangerous chemicals into the river. Heat is released into the atmosphere by cars. During exercise, the body releases chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. She started to cry, releasing all of her repressed emotion. Exercise is a good way to release stress.

Noun

the release of the hostages The prisoner is eligible for early release. There was a controversy over the release of wolves into the park. The prisoner was given an early release. the release of heat into the atmosphere Exercise triggers the release of chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. an accidental release of pollutants into the river They've filed a request for release from the contract. They're requesting a release from their contractual obligations. The release of the book is scheduled for next month.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The Arctic Circle, including areas of Alaska, Siberia, Canada and Scandinavia, is experiencing its worst wildfire season ever, with more than 100 blazes burning through dried up peat bogs, releasing megatons of carbon. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Rare Lightning Strikes Detected 300 Miles From North Pole," 14 Aug. 2019 His case gained national attention with President Donald Trump calling the prime minister of Sweden to help release him from jail. Maria Pasquini, PEOPLE.com, "A$AP Rocky Found Guilty of Assault in Sweden But Won't Face Additional Jail Time," 14 Aug. 2019 Other major tech companies that have released open-source operating systems to compete with Android and iOS and have failed to attract enough people and developers. Sherisse Pham, CNN, "Huawei's Android rival is trying to succeed where Samsung and Microsoft failed," 14 Aug. 2019 More widespread as an energy source in Europe than in the United States, anaerobic digestion converts methane gas, which is released as organic matter decomposes, into natural gas. Los Angeles Times, "Turning rotten food and poop into energy: Investors smell an opportunity," 14 Aug. 2019 De Blasio tried 11 different foods at the state fair and took the brave step of releasing a photo of him eating a corn dog, something consultants usually advise against in this age of Photoshop. Seth A. Richardson, cleveland.com, "Trump promotes fracking at Pennsylvania cracker plant: The Flyover," 14 Aug. 2019 On Friday, newly released legal documents from a defamation suit that Roberts brought against Maxwell not only underscored old accusations but also surfaced previously unheard allegations of inappropriate behavior. Washington Post, "Prince Andrew’s connection to Jeffrey Epstein under new scrutiny following resurfaced allegations, suicide," 14 Aug. 2019 Soon after Todd released the statement, his children commented on the post with words of support. Kelly O'sullivan, Country Living, "Todd Chrisley Was Reportedly Indicted for Tax Evasion and Several Other Charges," 14 Aug. 2019 After being released, it was quickly signed by dozens of employees at the company. Colin Lecher, The Verge, "Google employees ‘refuse to be complicit’ in border agency cloud contract," 14 Aug. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Several celebrities and even some lawmakers had also spoken out for his release after he had been held for weeks without any charges. Catherine Kim, Vox, "Vox Sentences: One step closer to an Ebola cure," 15 Aug. 2019 The idea that education can help reduce recidivism and give inmates a true second chance upon their release is the idea driving The Last Mile. Arika Herron, Indianapolis Star, "Education Secretary Betsy DeVos touts 'second chances' for young Indiana inmates learning to code," 14 Aug. 2019 Amazon Studios, which purchased the documentary out of Sundance, is investing heavily in its theatrical release in hopes of garnering Oscar recognition. Paula Bernstein, Fortune, "Documentaries Stand Out at the Box Office During a Summer of Sequels," 14 Aug. 2019 Swedish legal experts said at the time that their release was a sign that defendants would most likely be found not guilty, or found guilty and sentenced to time served. Alex Marshall, New York Times, "ASAP Rocky Guilty of Assault in Sweden but Won’t Face Prison Time," 14 Aug. 2019 Since its release in 2017, the Hulu Original series has often shared space online with a robust discourse about women’s rights, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from the social media monitoring service, Crowd Tangle. Teghan Simonton, USA Today, "The Handmaid's Tale rides the political wave around women's rights — and contributes.," 13 Aug. 2019 Upon its release, the revisionist story unsurprisingly provoked a stream of debate and criticism. Gabe Friedman, sun-sentinel.com, "A decade after release of ‘Inglourious Basterds’ has its legacy changed?," 13 Aug. 2019 They were never told about a decision the higher-ups had made until forced to write a press release about it. John Wilkens, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Glen Broom, influential PR professor and author, dies at 78," 12 Aug. 2019 The program will begin processing the new cycle of applications from owners of at least 60 acres of farmland this fall, according to their press release. Akira Kyles, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Carroll County Agricultural Preservation Program will stop accepting applications after Aug. 30," 12 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'release.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of release

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1828, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for release

Verb (1)

Middle English relesen, from Anglo-French relesser, from Latin relaxare to relax

Noun

Middle English reles, from Anglo-French, from relesser

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Statistics for release

Last Updated

17 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for release

The first known use of release was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for release

release

verb

English Language Learners Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to allow (a person or animal) to leave a jail, cage, prison, etc. : to set (someone or something) free
: to stop holding (someone or something)
: to allow (a substance) to enter the air, water, soil, etc.

release

noun

English Language Learners Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

: the act of allowing a person or animal to leave a jail, cage, prison, etc.
: the act of allowing a substance to enter the air, water, soil, etc.
: the act of freeing someone from a duty, responsibility, etc.

release

verb
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Kids Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to set free or let go of The fish was caught and released. He released his hold on the rope.
2 : to allow to escape The factory released chemicals into the river.
3 : to relieve from a duty, responsibility, or burden She released him from his promise.
4 : to give up or hand over to someone else I released my claim.
5 : to permit to be published, sold, or shown The movie will be released next month.

release

noun

Kids Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of setting free or letting go release of a prisoner
2 : the act of allowing something to escape the release of smoke
3 : a discharge from an obligation or responsibility
4 : relief or rescue from sorrow, suffering, or trouble release from pain
5 : a device for holding or releasing a mechanism
6 : the act of making something available to the public
7 : something (as a new product or song) that is made available to the public

release

transitive verb
re·​lease
released; releasing

Legal Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : to relieve or free from obligation, liability, or responsibility the debtor is released from all dischargeable debts
b : to give up (a claim, title, or right) to the benefit of another person : surrender
2 : to set free from confinement was released on personal recognizance

release

noun

Legal Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : discharge from an obligation or responsibility that bars a cause of action did not effect a release of the school for any negligence
b : the giving up or renunciation of a right or claim that bars a cause of action was a release of the remainder of the debt

Note: A release may in some situations require consideration in order to be valid. A release of one joint obligor sometimes is considered to release all the obligors.

2 : an act or instrument that effects a release signed a release issued by the insurer

called also release of all claims

— compare hold harmless
3 : the act or instance of freeing especially from custody

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More from Merriam-Webster on release

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for release

Spanish Central: Translation of release

Nglish: Translation of release for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of release for Arabic Speakers

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