release

verb (1)
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to set free from restraint, confinement, or servitude release hostages release pent-up emotions release the brakes also : to let go : dismiss released from her job
2 : to relieve from something that confines, burdens, or oppresses was released from her promise
3 : to give up in favor of another : relinquish release a claim to property
4 : to give permission for publication, performance, exhibition, or sale of also : to make available to the public the commission released its findings release a new movie

intransitive verb

: to move from one's normal position (as in football or basketball) in order to assume another position or to perform a second assignment

release

noun

Definition of release (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : relief or deliverance from sorrow, suffering, or trouble
2a : discharge from obligation or responsibility
b(1) : relinquishment of a right or claim
(2) : an act by which a legal right is discharged specifically : a conveyance of a right in lands or tenements to another having an estate in possession
3a : the act or an instance of liberating or freeing (as from restraint)
b : the act or manner of concluding a musical tone or phrase
c : the act or manner of ending a sound : the movement of one or more vocal organs in quitting the position for a speech sound
d : the action or manner of throwing a ball has a quick release
4 : an instrument effecting a legal release
5 : the state of being freed
6 : a device adapted to hold or release a mechanism as required
7a : the act of permitting performance or publication also : performance, publication became a best seller on its release
b : the matter released especially : a statement prepared for the press

re-lease

verb (2)
\ (ˌ)rē-ˈlēs How to pronounce re-lease (audio) \
re-leased; re-leasing; re-leases

Definition of re-lease (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to lease again

Other Words from release

Verb (1)

releasable \ ri-​ˈlē-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce re-lease (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for release

Synonyms: Verb (1)

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb (1)

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Choose the Right Synonym for release

Verb (1)

free, release, liberate, emancipate, manumit mean to set loose from restraint or constraint. free implies a usually permanent removal from whatever binds, confines, entangles, or oppresses. freed the animals from their cages release suggests a setting loose from confinement, restraint, or a state of pressure or tension, often without implication of permanent liberation. released his anger on a punching bag liberate stresses particularly the resulting state of liberty. liberated their country from the tyrant emancipate implies the liberation of a person from subjection or domination. labor-saving devices emancipated us from household drudgery manumit implies emancipation from slavery. the document manumitted the slaves

Examples of release in a Sentence

Verb (1) The hostages have been released. The judge released the prisoner. The lion was released from its cage. There is a lot of controversy over whether or not wolves should be released into the park. I released my son's hand, and he ran out onto the playground. The factory faced serious fines for releasing dangerous chemicals into the river. Heat is released into the atmosphere by cars. During exercise, the body releases chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. She started to cry, releasing all of her repressed emotion. Exercise is a good way to release stress. Noun the release of the hostages The prisoner is eligible for early release. There was a controversy over the release of wolves into the park. The prisoner was given an early release. the release of heat into the atmosphere Exercise triggers the release of chemicals in the brain that make you feel better. an accidental release of pollutants into the river They've filed a request for release from the contract. They're requesting a release from their contractual obligations. The release of the book is scheduled for next month. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb According to Prokupecz, a school spokesperson came out to meet reporters before a live shot to say the school would release a statement. Timothy Fanning, San Antonio Express-News, 1 June 2022 Sky Ferreira fans were starting to give up hope that the punky pop star would ever release new music again, but the day is finally here. Brittany Spanos, Rolling Stone, 25 May 2022 The first tweet promoted an exclusive NFT drop with Louis Vuitton and the second announced that Beeple would release a set of exclusive NFTs for free, according to Crypto Daily. Andrew Marquardt, Fortune, 23 May 2022 Taylor said the group would release a statement about its progress toward the end of May. Rachel Herzog, Arkansas Online, 22 May 2022 Several, like me, needed to verify their identities so the IRS would release 2021 refunds. Laura Saunders, WSJ, 20 May 2022 Moran argued that including all levels of talent on a representational basis would release those who are stigmatized by minoritization the confidence to shine. Nancy Doyle, Forbes, 19 May 2022 Opponents of the project have, in the past, confused what would be a mixing facility with an asphalt plant or manufacturer, which would involve more intense heating operations that would release particles, according to Walker. Dana Afana, Detroit Free Press, 17 May 2022 In an early morning tweet, Dallas police said Chief Garcia would release further information on the arrest later on Tuesday. Lawrence Richard, Fox News, 17 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But expectations were higher for a release this high-profile and based on a beloved character. Lindsey Bahr, USA TODAY, 19 June 2022 Jeff Laviero, 57, of Bristol, is recovering nicely after undergoing the kidney transplant last week at Yale New Haven Hospital and was scheduled for release Saturday. Pam Mcloughlin, Hartford Courant, 19 June 2022 Under new restrictions, which had been approved on a party-line vote in the House, about 500 inmates will no longer be eligible for early release on July 1. Laura Vozzella, Washington Post, 18 June 2022 The documentary, timed for release on Juneteenth, follows him around the country in 2020 and 2021 as the Black Lives Matter movement gained international prominence and sparked outrage about the treatment of Black people by the police. Fortune, 18 June 2022 Park Attendants were trained by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in tying knots, setting up fishing poles, removing hooks and other tips on keeping the fish alive for their release. cleveland, 17 June 2022 For his newest release, Drake did something a little special for his Apple Music listeners. Hannah Dailey, Billboard, 17 June 2022 The Justice Department, which had fought the disclosure of the records for more than a year, lost a recent key appeals court ruling that set the stage for their release. Sarah D. Wire, Los Angeles Times, 17 June 2022 Just in time for its theatrical release, Lightyear already has several collectibles that celebrate Buzz and new characters, like Sox. John Lonsdale, Rolling Stone, 16 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'release.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of release

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1828, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for release

Verb (1)

Middle English relesen, from Anglo-French relesser, from Latin relaxare to relax

Noun

Middle English reles, from Anglo-French, from relesser

Learn More About release

Time Traveler for release

Time Traveler

The first known use of release was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near release

releasability

release

re-lease

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for release

Last Updated

20 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Release.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/release. Accessed 1 Jul. 2022.

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More Definitions for release

release

verb
re·​lease | \ ri-ˈlēs How to pronounce release (audio) \
released; releasing

Kids Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to set free or let go of The fish was caught and released. He released his hold on the rope.
2 : to allow to escape The factory released chemicals into the river.
3 : to relieve from a duty, responsibility, or burden She released him from his promise.
4 : to give up or hand over to someone else I released my claim.
5 : to permit to be published, sold, or shown The movie will be released next month.

release

noun

Kids Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act of setting free or letting go release of a prisoner
2 : the act of allowing something to escape the release of smoke
3 : a discharge from an obligation or responsibility
4 : relief or rescue from sorrow, suffering, or trouble release from pain
5 : a device for holding or releasing a mechanism
6 : the act of making something available to the public
7 : something (as a new product or song) that is made available to the public

release

transitive verb
re·​lease
released; releasing

Legal Definition of release

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : to relieve or free from obligation, liability, or responsibility the debtor is released from all dischargeable debts
b : to give up (a claim, title, or right) to the benefit of another person : surrender
2 : to set free from confinement was released on personal recognizance

release

noun

Legal Definition of release (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : discharge from an obligation or responsibility that bars a cause of action did not effect a release of the school for any negligence
b : the giving up or renunciation of a right or claim that bars a cause of action was a release of the remainder of the debt

Note: A release may in some situations require consideration in order to be valid. A release of one joint obligor sometimes is considered to release all the obligors.

2 : an act or instrument that effects a release signed a release issued by the insurer

called also release of all claims

— compare hold harmless
3 : the act or instance of freeing especially from custody

More from Merriam-Webster on release

Nglish: Translation of release for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of release for Arabic Speakers

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